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Thanks William for an interesting presentation

Iron

laws of physics don't bend ?

very nice presentation

Iron

AS before wish I here for the live presentation, have played with several 8051 (when Intel was still doing them, Intel, Phillips, Siemens.. ), 68HC series, and Microchip.  Some applications had bot 68HC and Pic parts on the same board.

Iron

Good presentation.  Catching up on archived lessons.  Good vendor support and DEV kits on these processors.  I like the PIC family, but also use the 8051 and Atmel processors.  Also the Motorola 68K Family of processors did a nice job in their time.

Audio seems fine in the archive

Based on yesterdays lecture this should be another good one

Signing in a little late for the next three classes. I have been sick. I am glad these are archived. Thank you Bill for the presentations.

Thank you Bill, nice presentation.

Iron

8x51 architecture what I like -  Atmel's 89 series

Iron

Programming languages what we are using

: for MCUs- Assembler, C and sometimes C+ .

 

Iron

@Bill:  The Stellaris driver lib is simpler and easier to use to get fast results. It has excellent documentation. It was the crown jewel they got from Luminary.

Their own Code Composer Studio that works at full capcity on their own Eval Boards ir through an XDS 100 is a great strategy that allows you to test the entire range of capabilities of an MCU. The same IDE works across their entire line from MSP430 to the Full Arm Sitarra/OMAP and DSP as well as the Cortex line. It makes it easy to work with and integrate the various libraries into the IDE environment.

Easiest way to see the difference is to buy a Stellaris LaunchPad -- downlaoad the CCS 5 IDE, install Stellarisware and simply try it out.

The differences in sophistication should be obvious.

The ST Library vs Stellarisware is a Model T vs a well appointed, well maintained Ferrari.

Now if only TI could deliver and MCU with Ethernet that is not NRND...

 

Iron

Thanks Bill, great to hear about your experience in this field

Iron

Thanks, everyone, for the audio file download advice. I've had troubles with the RealDownloader popping up reliably on the audio player section of the web page. I;ll have to try the download helper plugin.

Well, I think that wraps it up. Thank you for your attention. Remember that all the devices and development tools we discussed today are available online from Digi-Key.

 Tune in tomorrow for my contraversial 16-bit presentation.

Bye now!

16-bit has the simplicity of an 8-bit with a register-based architecture. Unlike most 8-bit which are accumulator based.

16-bit is actually my favorite market segment.

16-bit is the compromise of performance and power.

 

I am curious to see what you will say that might make me want to look at a 16 bit tomorrow.

:-)

 

Are there any other questions?

@DaveWR sounds like you are saying TI's driver librarieds are better than STs? What is ST lacking?

Gotta go. Have a great day all that are left!

Iron

Anyway -- really must do some work today. Much to think about.

Cheers and see you tomorrow.

 

Iron

I have the Embest STM32F4 Discovery board (fro Newark) here with the Base Board and the display board -- just starting to test after giving up on waiting for M4 with Ethernet at TI.

Lot of features on the board. BUT! The TI driverl Lib seems far superior to me. The full fledged Code Composer Studio 5.3 is better than most -- and it's "free" -- but I need working hardware first.

Have just got Julia fractal converted to "play" with the board -- so far so good! Will know more in a few days.

Now need to find an IDE I can use. IAR is way too expensive for my humble shop.

Iron
For generating pwm i use Atmel AVR as a main controller LPC1768 used. As dev kit Chhosed Land Tiger which mostly like Keil's MCB1700

Yeah, well Mark, it seems that in the Age of ARM, microcontrollers are commodity parts and easily interchangable.

We can slap a SPI part in and have it up and running quickly.

 

SHeesh: So the model of the dev board is not as important - I have a project with chip on glass display, differnt hardware to talk to our propritary hardware hardware. THe interface I see is the Kiel debug panel.

The front panel is our shipping hardware and we look at the CPU as an interchangable part. (Don't tell the hardware venders - they get testy about this)

 

So the model of the dev board is not as important - I have a project with chip on glass display, differnt hardware for our hardware. THe interface I see is the Kiel debag panel.

@mark.browne, which NXP board are you using?

@Bill: Has anyone here switched from an 8-bit mcu to a 32-bit and why?

I used AVR Mega 2560 Arduino etc. It did not have the horse power for multiple sensors. Even TI LM4F120Xl is an issue -- esp. without ethernet.

 

Iron

@Bill:  you need to ask some of your questions like whether anybody uses CAN tomorrow when mor people are here.

Iron

I see it as keil - we use that for all inhouse stuff. THe programers view of ST/TI/NXP is all about the same. THe NXP dev board has the best hardware and I can run it to a breadboard with minimal effort.

Anyone here using a 32-bit microcontroller that is not and ARM and not a MIPS? Can you tell us what it is?

Keep those questions coming!

The dev kit laying next to my station for trying out ideas is an NXP arm

Interesting. You say it's for "trying out idea". Which NXP deve kit is it, and what features are important to you?

TO answer your "why" question - speed of development.

I have to go. Thank you for the great session today.

I just happened to have Z80s in my stock.  I also have 8080s but they are harder to use.

Iron

The dev kit laying next to my station for trying out ideas is an NXP arm.

If you can consider the TNT4882 a microcontroller.  It's about the only GPIB controller left in the world still in production.

Iron

8 to 32 switch question - we have for many of our products. Our older stuff in 8 bit motorola parts, newer is ST arm.

I have a TI cortex project in late stage development.

@Kentj, have you looked at the Zilog eZ80? Code compatible with the Z80 and it's higher performance.

Yes and no.  In my bread board I'm using an 8 bit Z80 to control my hardware but the hard model and beyond will be using the PIC32

Iron

Anyone here using more than one microcontroller in a project?

Has anyone here switched from an 8-bit mcu to a 32-bit and why?

CAN is too slow too.  The slowest on board communications I'm using is SPI at 20Mbps

Iron

All ARM microcontrollers are Harvard

@BillGiovino: So ARM MCU's are harvard or modified harvard? Even Intel/Marvell based?

Iron

@Kentj, what communications are slow?

CAN 2.0b runs at 1 Mbits/sec

The PIC32MX700 series has CAN but some communications are too slow.

Iron

What is the speed of a CAN network?

Iron

Anyone here using CAN networking?

Harvard is more efficient. Now, if you are going to place lookup tables in Flash, a Harvard architecture might hinder your program. Look for MCUs with special lookup table instructions, or Modified Harvard architectrures.

A Harvard architecture uses seperate busses for data and program memory, More complicated, much higer performance, a bit more expensive. All 32-bit MCUs use Harvard architectures

My present project and the next one need USB, Ethernet, and GPIB.

Iron

The Von Neuman archtecture has program memory and data memory sharing the same busses. Simpler, less expensive, less performance.

it has built in USB, Ethernet, timers, vectored interrupts, 512K Flash, 128K SRAM (in the mx695, the 675 has 64K) .  Also I like the ICD3 and MPLABX.

All inportant features - look at all the networking!

Also the PIC32 has the TQFP foot print.  My board layout tool has a problem with BGAs with that many pins.

Iron

@Bill, it has built in USB, Ethernet, timers, vectored interrupts, 512K Flash, 128K SRAM (in the mx695, the 675 has 64K) .  Also I like the ICD3 and MPLABX.

Iron

Got to go! 

Very good session/s, Thank you Bill and all participants!

 

@BillBGiovino: How about effeciency with respect to harvard and von neumann architectures?

Iron

@gaun interesting, thanks!

BllGiovino: Easier to learn. I am not compared the cycles of different micro's for effeciency.

Iron

Re: code security, Maxim has an interesting tutorial (5522) Industrial Systems Need the Added Protection of Security ICs on their website. This technique pertains to stopping cyber hackers at the chip level.

@Anatolly, yes, PIC16 is everywhere!

Yes. Si4010 is very suitable for battery power applications, especially with a low price.

Iron

Assembly is made simpler on a MSP430 with just 27 instructions.

So do you consider the MSP430 instruction set to be very efficient?

@Kentj, what do you like about the PIC32?

@TonyD, those Silabs parts are EXTREMELY low power, aren't they?

Assembly is made simpler on a MSP430 with just 27 instructions.

Iron

My favorite microcontroller now is the PIC32.  It was 8 bit but all the ones I'm familiar with have built in EPROMs and I don't have an EPROM programmer anymore.

Iron

8051, TI SOC cc1110 and Silicon Labs SOC Si4010

Iron

8-16-32 bit and C/C+

VHDL for FPGA, but that's another story

Also if anybody wants to peek into their favourite micro's insides you can have a look here http://www.flylogic.net/blog/ for decapped micro's images (Atmel http://www.flylogic.net/blog/?cat=2  and microchip http://www.flylogic.net/blog/?cat=1)

Iron

If anyone here is using an 8051, can you tell me which 8051 manufacturer you are using?

(Remember to mention 8051 in your response)

C, ever used assembly

Iron

@Bill

Verilog for hardware design and verification

C/C+ for modeling and functional verification

Iron

It depends. The most suitable, performance and price, is the best one.

Iron

What programming languages do you all like to use?

@Bill, Pentium 4 and PIC32MX695F512 (Pentium 4 is shorter:)

Iron

Cortex M3/Cortex M4/PIC32

Iron

What are your favorite microcontroller cores, 8-bit 16-bit 32-bit?

@Bill

There are couple of them available at www.opencores.org like mips32r, plasma core and some others

Iron

Digi-Key has the most extesive inventory of ARM Cortex microcontrollers and development boards available.

@guan

thanks for a very interesting link. Time to brush up some security basics

Iron

Can anyone share with me the 32-bit cores you have worked with?

Link to the M0 / M4 beast at Newark.

http://canada.newark.com/nxp/lpc4357-evb/eval-brd-lpc4357-dual-core-cortex/dp/28W4943?in_merch=Popular%20Products

It's different. :-)

Iron

@guan, thanks, I'll look at that link later!

  •  EVAL BRD, LPC4357, DUAL CORE CORTEX M0/M4

That mmight be the closest you get in embedded to fuse CISC(m$) and RISC(M0) 

Not sure what Bill would think of that assessment. lol

Well I'd have to take a closer look at the board. But it's strange,the M0 and teh M4 are very different animals.

@BillGiovino Apart from "Low power" which gets thrown around there is also "Security". There was a very interesting article recently about the Atmel MARC4 here http://adamsblog.aperturelabs.com/2013/01/fun-with-masked-roms.html

Iron

My personal test is to look at bit manipulation. If tyhere is native bit manipulation for bit test, set, clear - and you don't have to do 3 or more instructions to set it up - it's a CSIC.

@Alaskaman66 There is a very good article by Analog devices to select a DSP in the "The scientist & engineers guide to DSP" book you may want to look at.

Iron

Thank you DaveWR! I am hoping that he might put some light on it tomorrow?

Bill:

I was not sure what to expect out of thie week. I am still convinced that I don't know very much...

Maybe I'm still just a good guesser -- sometimes... maybe...

Learned how PIC fits in -- wasn't sure..

Iron

Anatoly:

  •  EVAL BRD, LPC4357, DUAL CORE CORTEX M0/M4

That mmight be the closest you get in embedded to fuse CISC(m$) and RISC(M0) 

Not sure what Bill would think of that assessment. lol

Iron

What I was getting at is the advantage is development speed during development. I spend my time development and not fighting to get the CPU to do what I want it to do. This for short run products that pushes me to an arm part where it might not make sense from a pure product requirement point of view.

The cost of deveopment can be higher than the BOM of short run products.

@Tariq and @DaveWR, I apriciate your guys comments and questions. I am still a newbie...only since 2009.

Thanks, Guan. Will check it out. Now I need to dive into my text on Digital Signal Processing...

Tariq: I am just a newbie -- have been since the late 60s -- I'll let you know when I learn enough to be worthwhile... lol...

Iron

Q: Is there any trend to fuse together RISC and CISC under same roof in some future? As a multi-core approach / implementation to benifit from both sets.

Bill:

I adapted Slackware for the Board from TriM(?) -- moved it up to Slack 10 later. It was not that important for "Real Time".

Iron

@DaveWR

I want to connect with you. How to contact you? We can hopefully educate each other a lot ;)

 

Thanks

tariq786 (tulamba786786@gmail.com)

Iron

You can find all the NXP LPC parts at Digi-Key

wow. Thanks. ST & Microchip...

Iron

@DaveWR, can you tell me who's linux code did you use for embedded linux on a MIPS?

1 last question for all: Do Freescale (motorola) still entertain the Automotive industry? (something I haven't followed)

Freescale is still in the Automotive industry, but they no longer dominate the industry. ST and Microchip have a lot of Automotive MCU sockets.

@Tariq: Familiar with Raspberry PI... Used Embedded Linux before -- with MIPS even... :-)

Iron

It may be possible to do an app in the 8 bit part but the raw power and large registers makes it possible to do prototypeing w/o having to fight with the limits of the CPU. I don't have to worry if the data will fit in the word or messing with multibyte math - it just works.

This is an excellent example of when a 32-bit can be used in an 8-bit socket - more overhead for testing and proto code

1 last question for all: Do Freescale (motorola) still entertain the Automotive industry? (something I haven't followed)

Iron

Here is one for people:

  •  EVAL BRD, LPC4357, DUAL CORE CORTEX M0/M4

You can finit a Newark for Example -- is it an SoC -- just an AMP? How difficult would it be to program with/without an RTOS?

It reminds me of the TI COncerto -- Cortex M3 plus C2000

I thought about it for a recent project -- too many questions...

Iron

@tariq, yes, SoCs and microcontrollers are the same thing. So is ASSP (Application Specific Standard Product). In general, if it's not useful to search the internet for the term, then the term isn't useful. Nobody searches for SoC or ASSP.

It may be possible to do an app in the 8 bit part but the raw power and large registers makes it possible to do prototypeing w/o having to fight with the limits of the CPU. I don't have to worry if the data will fit in the word or messing with multibyte math - it just works.

 

@DaveWR

 

Dude thanks for your comment. I still disagree. YOu should see Raspberry PI to convince yourself that you are powering a desktop out of a ARM core

Iron

@Bill: I call shotgun...

(See you tomorrow, and everyone else, too)

Iron

Thanks, Bill. That will help as I need a very low power core.

I love EmbeddedSystems!

That should be a bumper sticker!

@tariq @blake thanks, nice to know I'm helping out!

Yes, thank you for taking the time do do this.

I love EmbeddedSystems!

Iron

When using a 32-bit and looking for low power, is there a key point to look at? You mentioned that "Low power" has become more of a marketing term

.

Look at the run current, usually spec'ed in uA/MHz, and also examine the sleep modes. If your system will spend a lot of time sleepling, the sleep current will be more important than the run current.

Also look to see how many cycles it takes to respond to an interrupt.

Thanks Bill for such a good Q&A. I really appreciate all questions and answers as they help us learn.

Iron

Looks like we are so busy here that not all posts are getting through. If you don't see your post, just re-post!

I found that companies who entertain SoCs are typically planning for future trends, (within their budgets). I'd say its a smart move.

Iron

@Tariq: Yep running a cell phone is a small set of what computers can do -- it is a set peripherals specific to a cell phone -- but I would not use the chip to power a desktop. :-)

It uses an RTOS and sometimes even Adroid orIOS and even a Windows subset ith specific enhancements -- but maybe not so good at full windows.

This is one of the areas that makes it hard to decide on what MCU Mp to choose.

Iron

When using a 32-bit and looking for low power, is there a key point to look at? You mentioned that "Low power" has become more of a marketing term.

SO a better question could be if SoC can run operating systems like any RTOS, why use MCs to run RTOS? It seems SoC and MCs are becoming the same thing. Please correct me if i am wrong.

Well, to me an SoC (System on a Chip) is just another word for a microcontroller. It's a name that makes things confusing.

I agree with you, tariq. SoC are more diverse, and have multiple functionality; not so systematic...

Iron

This might be a good use for a shadow register: Response to fire the halon bottle after a UV sensor detects an ignition source for mining equipment..

@DaveWR

Iphone and other cell phones have SoC. They can do many things, audio, video, phone, communication.

I disagree.

but thanks for your comment

Iron

In your slide you have mentioned about the Set Top Box focus for STMicro. What is  special about this chip? Are there any more focussed chips that I have to be concerned about?

That tells you that ST has a large user-base, which cemets their committment to the ARM market. OTOH it also means that if you live near a set-top box manufacturer you may not get the best tech support because the big company is getting the attention you want.

@Mazian,

 

No you cannot describe RTOS in Verilog or Vhdl.


You can describe RTOS in C/C+

Iron

Tariq: I say no -- an SoC is usually task specific.

Iron

For math intensive applications (encryption, FFT,MPEG-4 codec, etc) could you use a DSP chip with a smaller MCU?

Yes, or you could use an MCU with a DSP unit on chip, like the Cortex-M4.

QUESTION - In your slide you have mentioned about the Set Top Box focus for STMicro. What is  special about this chip? Are there any more focussed chips that I have to be concerned about?

Iron

SO a better question could be if SoC can run operating systems like any RTOS, why use MCs to run RTOS?

It seems SoC and MCs are becoming the same thing

Please correct me if i am wrong

Iron

Q: could your RTOS be in HDL languages, such as VHDL or Verilog?

Iron

Keil and IAR have wonderful development tools. Keil is part of ARM Inc, IAR is the largest and has the broadest portfolio.

@Alaskaman66: You can use the ultra lower power DSP C5000chips from TI 

Iron

SoC questions: Here is an example.

The TI MSP430F47197 is an SoC for Enrgy use tracking. You need to program its flash and use an RTOS just like any other chip.

Its claim to faim is an SigmaDelta ADC that can read seven channels simultaneously.

Iron

Now many tasks for using an RTOS - it depands on the number and compelxity of the tasks. You coulod have 40 simple tasks, or 10 complicated tasks, both could need an RTOS

bill, what about 3rd party development tools manufacturers as keil? they have wonderfull development tools.

Iron

No, embedded Linux can't always be called real-time.

Q: How many task would you say would be worth considering using an RTOS for?

@tariq786: RTOS is software, SoC is hardware.

Iron

If you are having problems with the designnews.com website - on Windows, unplug your router, go to a command prompt and type

ipconfig /flushdns

then turn on your router.

@rhall007: you're right. I forgot unlike Intel they didn't make both!

 
Iron

For math intensive applications (encryption, FFT,MPEG-4 codec, etc) could you use a DSP chip with a smaller MCU?

@cca028. YOu are welcome ;)

Iron

@sherlock: It depends upon how real-time you want Linux to be.

Iron

@Sherlock: Some Linux distros can be called Real Time -- bit certainkly not all.

Iron

@tariq786 - good one ;)

Iron

And thank you for the compliments, I appreciate the feedback, really!

Thanks Willian A. You did a good job.

Iron

Any comparisons of RTOS' online anywhere?

 

Iron

Thank you Jennifer & Bill.

Iron

Thank you Bill and Jennifer

Iron

Bill, 

Very good presentation and thanks for adding the page numbers !

Dave

Iron

thanks bill.excellent!!

 

Iron

Linux is a real RTOS. I am right?

Iron

Gibe me a minute to review your questions...

thanks Bill and Kimberly

Iron

Thanks, Bill and Jiniffer

Iron

Thank you for today's presentation Bill

 

Iron

Thanks, Bill and Jennifer!

Iron

what is the difference between RTOS and SoC (system on a  chip)?

Iron

MazianLab: AMD doesn't make microcontrollers, they make microprocessors.

Iron

Please correct me if I'm wrong: you can program your ARM ucontroller with your own written OS! Similar concept as EEPROM?

Iron

Revolution??? Someone just woke up...

Iron

A possible RTOS alternative -- sometimes...

http://www.state-machine.com/index.php

 

Iron

Thank you Jennifer! Way too many interruptions with useless computer troupleshooting tips (is your computer on, powercycle your router, etc...) and inline questions...

Iron

Q: Is there any trend to fuse together RISC and CISC under same roof in some future?

Interrupt on CORTEX TI claims 6-7 cycles typical with tail chaining etc.

Iron

QUESTION - In your slide you have mentioned about the Set Top Box focus for STMicro. What is  special about this chip? Are there any more focussed chips that I have to be concerned about?

Iron

@UART: uci = University of California - Irvine

Iron

@drw36, thanks going to look at that.

It's interesting AMD is not mentioned here at all! They're falling behind in computation race I guess!

Iron

Question: What is the interrupt overhead of a 32-bit MCU ?

@UART: Not sure about "certifications" but for education update look at https://unex.uci.edu/areas/engineering/embedded/ . I just finished that program. All online.

Iron

@Tariq786. Ah, right. Slide 12!!!! Thanks!

Iron

What Certifications are out there for Embedded Systems (Software/Hardware Engineer)?

Iron

Question: Is there any RISC for ARM? If yes, is it as good as normal RISC?

Iron

Thanks, I am communicating at a high frequency. Dealing with real time sensors.

Did the site max out or change network setting?
Iron
The network is being messed up again!
Iron

Before arm cores, what were the companies listed on page 8 doing? I believe they had their own Instruction set architecture and implementation for MCs

Iron

thanks for your answer.i prefer nxp and atmel.

 

Iron

QUESTION - In your slide you have mentioned about the Set Top Box focus for STMicro. What is  special about this chip? Are there any more focussed chips that I have to be concerned about?

Iron

Does that handle sensors well when you must use UART to send the resulting data wirelessly?

How to choose between different architectures: ARM, AVR32, MIPS .... ?

@tariq786: slides 9 and 10... Google is your friend...

Iron

@tariq786 - ARM designs processor cores, and licenses the Intellectual Property of those designs to folks who make devices, those companies on slide 8. Those companies add their peripherals to differentiate their products from others.

Iron

in your opinion, what is the best company or companies offering 32bit development tools and support?

Iron

Please explain what in reality is MIPS?

What in reality is ARM?

What is the difference between the two?

Iron

If dealling with multiple sensor, i.e 8 anolog sensors, should you use 32-bit?

How does the AVR32 architecture that atmel offers weigh in?

Iron

In embedded design: When do you consider "faster clock rate" vs "larger word/bit" (ex: 8,16,20, 32, etc)?

Iron

You have not discussed ARM? Please explain what is ARM and i believe ARM is not a microcontroller. Why are you bringing ARM into MC?

Iron

Maggiesun, the show will be archived immediately following, so you may be able to listen that way.

ST has MCUs with high end stuff...

STM32F407VGT6 microcontroller featuring
32-bit ARM Cortex-M4F core,

FPU

also some DSP like capability

1 MB Flash, 192KB RAM

in an LQFP100 package

Iron

ha ha ha... "helpful" troubleshooting tips (verbally for those who can't get audio)

Iron

if they can't hear you, they won't hear these instructions.  You might want to type them in.

Iron

@maggiesun: some companies block audio streams. there's not much we can do anything about that

Blogger

The website is blocked so I cant play the radio. Any dia in number I can use?

Iron

How about FFT in 8-bit MCU vs FFT in 32-bit MCU ?.

so, it's performance, not the 32 vs 16 vs 8 bit core... 32 bit cores are generally more powerful...

Iron

Offload the math to a DSP chip?

audio is not good here

 

Iron

The website is blocked so I cant play the radio. Any dia in number I can use?

Iron

complex math is a good case for a DSP...

Iron

Good day from Huntsville, Al

Iron

Good day from Huntsville, Al

Iron

If complex math  or software is the issue, then why not use microprocessor instead of a MC?

Iron

It didn't autostart for me (LINUX)

Iron

What is the relation bw 32 bit and "high end communications"??? I understand the 32 bit addressing, etc... but why communications?

Iron

maggiesun: start at the player at the top of the window

Blogger

Do you have dia in number?

Iron

Had to restart several times

 

Iron

Audio working for me.

 

Iron

sorry about the sound everyone - should be fine now.

 

Finally my audio works.. I had to rload and then log in again

Iron

Audio works now. Needed a few extra reloads.

 

Iron

I repeatedly press play/pause numerous times, finally the audio comes in loud and clear.   :)

@HSLee Yes and no.  It started but even Jennifer doesn't have audion apparently

Iron

HELLO FROM MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA

Finally got the audio going!

Finally got the audio working... (server overload?)

Iron

Bill, problems with your audio. If you've started there is no sound.

Iron

I've got a player, but after "blog talk radio" no sound. Already reloaded the page to effect.

Up now!

Keep refreshing!!

and hitting play

Iron

Clicking the 'play' button on the radio doesn't start the audio.  Am I the only one with that problem?

 

Iron

My audio finally works

Iron

Am I the only one with player not showing up?

Iron

Hello from Greensboro, NC

Iron
hello from winston salem, nc
Iron

Hello from snowy and cold Toronto!

Iron

Hello from Albuquerque.

Iron

Jennifer, can you hear me?

Thanks a lot for the inquiry. Will have a look into this.

Iron
 
 Thank you it seems that you are right :-)
Iron

MICROCHIP
32-bit Answer: For most MCUs, including the 32-bit PIC32 MCUs, you have to have more than one bank of RAM in order to be able to turn unused RAM off.  Since the PIC32s currently all have a single bank of RAM, it's not currently possible to turn off any RAM in a PIC32.

16-bit Answer:
Microchip does have the ability to selectively power the RAM in sleep with their 16-bit MCUs.  This is the difference between the LV-Sleep Mode and the Deep Sleep Mode.  This saves a lot of power.  LV-Sleep is roughly 300 nA, while Deep Sleep is 10nA with RAM off.

A followup from a question on yesterday about dynamically turning RAM and peripherals on a microcontroller on and off. Microchip and Atmel responded to me:

For both Atmel and Microchip: for peripherals, you can stop the clock to peripherals as well as turn off the power supply to the peripheral.

Atmel RAM: "For ultra low power micros users can normally select if they want to power the entire SRAM or parts of it. This is new technology that is rolling out fast now"

"For peripherals Atmel does clock gating (i.e. remove the clock source to the peripheral) on devices in low leakage processes where switching is the major contributor to power consumption. This includes tinyAVR, megaAVR and AVR XMEGA. For products in denser process geometries where not only switching, but also leakage is a big contributor we have inplemetned power islands for both peripherals and SRAM, example products are SAM7L, UC3L and SAM4L"

Hello from Binghamton, NY

Iron

I also use DownloadHelper in Firefox

Hello from Waterloo, ON, Canada

thanks for the info. I'll take a look at thoe options.

Iron

fjgalan - I'm not entirely sure what it means, but I think that is your status (iron, gold, etc.). The more you comment/post on our site, the more you move up. For instance, I'm "gold." Hope this helps.

good morning everyone, sunny S. CA

Iron

Hello from Longmont, CO

Iron

@vsabino... I have been using Activ MP3 Recorder. very simple, free and reliable.

Iron

Someone knows whats means the word IRON after the name, in Chat?

 

Iron

@vsabino:  How to copy streamed audio out of your browser cache:  http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Download_MP3s_from_Streaming_Music_Sites

@rodan1984 I believe that is correct.

what time will begin this lecture? one hour more?

Iron

Good evening from Iasi, Romania

Iron

Hi everybody From gdl, México

Iron

Hello from Sunny SE Lake Simcoe Ontario Canada -- except it's snowing and icy again. 

Iron

@vsabino, No Down Load Helper is a Firefox Add On helper app.

Iron

Vancouver BC, much nicer than Vancouver WA

Iron

does  Down Helper work with Windows Internet Explorer?

Iron

I am in Vancouver BC, Canada. Thanks Kentj.

Iron

@Bitbanger55, i use a Firefox add on called Down Helper and it works just fine for me.

http://www.downloadhelper.net/

Iron

Agreed, CurtD. Definitely a tad nippy out there today.

Iron

Yes. I received starbucks gife card before for the last season.

They will send the card after the end of the season.

Iron

I have received a couple by e-mail too.

Iron

Yes, I got one sent by e-mail from Design News.   Not like the past when shirts were promised and never sent.  Thing are good now.

Iron

Hello from Edmonton, AB

Iron

Hello from Deer Valley, AZ!  There's this water falling frmo the sky here!  what is it?!!!  ;)

Platinum

Day3 32 bit MCU just is my attention.

Iron

Good afternoon, everyone

Iron

Sunny with some clouds, 28F in this area of Vermont.

Iron

Morning from Portland Oregon

Iron

Greetings from eastern Mass. Freezing here too!

Iron

All white today! Freeeeeezing cold!

Iron

@bitbanger: When I hover over the audio player bar in an archived session, SOMETIMES a RealPlayer popup appears to "download this clip". Also, after right-clicking on the audio player bar, one of the selections is "download this video". (ignore the fact that this is not a video) The audio file is downloaded into the RealPlayer library, which allows you to convert it to an MP3 and/or transfer it into an iPod. At least that is what it claims. I just downloaded the audio from Monday, and converted it to MP3. I have not transferred it into aniPod. Obviously this requires the RealPlayer audio plugin to be the default for your browser.

Iron

@sherlock:  Vancouver, WA or BC?

Iron

Hello all from Richmond, TX

Iron

Good morning from Mobile, AL

Good day all from Colorado Springs, CO - catch you all during the presentation.

Iron

For extremely low-power ARM micros, check out Energy Micro.

Iron

Howdy folks!!  :)  {Will tonights midwest ice storm get us?}  Naw, surely not.  :)

Good Morning from Cold and Sunny San Jose, CA.

It's 38°F now and a High of 59°F.

Iron

Good Morning from Partly Sunny Boston. Slide Deck's up 1-21 Like Scotty on 20,LOL

Iron

Is there any way to get an MP3 audio file to download for these archived sessions so they can be hosted onto an iPod or similar audio player? So far using a browser with a live connection seems to be the only supported listening mode.

Thanks for the numbered power points.

nite

Iron

There are no power points yet.

Iron

Hump day (if not influenced by Presidents day)



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