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MD17
User Rank
Iron
Re: Ieeew
MD17   2/1/2013 4:51:02 PM
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Having once worked repairing computers in the back woods of Papua New Guinea, I can attest to the fact that "Raid Kills Computers Dead!".  A client had a colony of ants take up residence in his computer, entering and exiting through the ventilation holes.  He gave them a shot of Raid through the vent holes and left it to air out.  The next time he powered up, all the magic smoke escaped from the computer.  In due course I received the remains (of both the computer and the ants).  At least this particular variety of Raid was both conductive and corrosive and did a real number on the PCB.

jnissen
User Rank
Iron
The bugs had little to do with the beeping
jnissen   2/1/2013 2:16:22 PM
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This is a known issue with GE branded ovens. I had the exact same beeping and strange issues a couple years ago. The fix is has become famous as many thousands of folks have fixed their oven with a couple simple pieces of paper. In my case the paper fix did not fix the errors and a new front panel was required to eliminate the beeping. The timer board was just fine - only the tactile feedback button assembly.

The fix in more detail

http://fp1.centurytel.net/Powerman/Dreaded%20F7%20Problem.pdf

 

In this case the bugs were likely just an additional added distraction. Normally bug bodies do not become conductive unless the voltage is high enough. I've had A/C units not start from wasp bodies shorting across the run cap!

Constitution_man
User Rank
Gold
Re: Ieeew
Constitution_man   2/1/2013 12:32:13 PM
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Sometimes the "bugs" have hair and a hearbeat.  A grain dryer I repaired years ago... was reported, strangely, to have all the insulation missing from its wiring inside a control module.  When I arrived and removed the cover, the report was correct, but failed to mention the skeleton of a mouse laying in the bottom of the box, along with a pile of colored PVC fragments located, more or less, where the little critter's stomach would have been at the moment of death.  The little dude had eaten all the insulation off the wiring with his little chisel teeth, probably could not crawl out due to his increased girth from a belly full of nondigestibles, and simply expired there in the box.  When the farmer came out to "power up" the console weeks later, arcing immediately kicked the controller off, and he called me.  I rewired the box with XLPE wire [mice don't like XLPE] and it ran great after that.

Analog Bill
User Rank
Gold
Re: Ieeew
Analog Bill   2/1/2013 12:17:45 PM
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I  could rant for hours about how the current generation of appliance designers are completely out-of-touch with the actual useage of their products. My experience with an Amana range has sworn me off that brand forever. Within months of purchase, the plastic trim at the oven vent had become so embrittled that it literally crumbled away. Gee, you think the designer considered that it might get hot there? Duh ... try 400+ degrees!  Of course, letters to them went unanswered ... and even worse, replacement parts were not available from the "factory".

My experience with bugs takes me back to working in the radio-TV repair shop for a huge department store in Florida (remember when radios could actually be repaired?). Opening the cabinet would often release a half-dozen huge cockroaches that would scurry across my workbench (they seemed to especially like to feed on paper speaker cones) to be "re-discovered" another day. I always kept a can of aerosol contact cleaner (in those days, TV tuners contained big multi-wafer rotary switches that, especially in Florida's climate, required periodic cleaning) on the bench at the ready ... it killed the critters pretty quick!  I now live in California ... you couldn't pay me enough to live in Florida again!  Bugs are just one reason ...

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Ieeew
GTOlover   2/1/2013 9:22:40 AM
NO RATINGS
I have a microwave that has a fly stuck between the front window and the metal screen. It was alive for about 3 or 4 days and died. Its carcass is visible in the bottom ledge. For the life of me, I cannot figure out how it got there and will not take apart the door to get it out. I figure this is way to important to mess up the door and get overexposure to microwaves.

At least I did not have teko's experience. I think I would have tossed the control out the door if the surface was moving!

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Ieeew
jmiller   1/31/2013 9:52:28 PM
Gross.  But interesting.  I have heard of similar experiences with other appliances.  Buttons getting stuck.  Why do I need so darn many options.  I don't need water in my fridge.  I don't need 15 different cooking cycles and I really only want to have one washer and dryer cycle.  Quit giving averything so much extra stuff that can break and design me a dependable appliance that lasts a long time so I can buy it.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Country Life
notarboca   1/31/2013 8:42:25 PM
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When I lived on some acreage in the country, I discovered fire ants are extremely attracted to voltage.  Telephone stopped working; telephone box outside packed with them. Air conditioning contactor would occassionally have to be sprayed as well.  I learned something new every day.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Bugs
Tim   1/31/2013 6:45:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Bugs do seem to get in the most inopportune places. I am sure the original design review for the stove didi not include "How do we stop bugs from getting in the controls?" Good sluething and not just throwing out the stove for a new one.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ieeew
Charles Murray   1/31/2013 6:42:03 PM
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History repeats itself. Here's an explanation of where the term "bug" came from in the computer world (from Wikipedia): "Operators traced an error in the Mark II (computer) to a moth trapped in a relay, coining the term 'bug.' This bug was carefully removed and taped to the log book. Stemming from the first bug, today we call errors or glitches in a program a bug."  The orginal incident occurred in 1946.  

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ieeew
Elizabeth M   1/31/2013 1:05:24 PM
NO RATINGS
That indeed is a true case of debugging. I don't think I would have imagined that could be the source of the problem, so that's some pretty good sleuthing on your part! What a small thing to cause such a racket. At least the constant beeping didn't ruin your New Year's Eve.

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