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Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Maytag Repairman
Charles Murray   1/28/2013 5:24:14 PM
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I believe you, LarryM. Your 1984 Maytag appliances were purchased in Maytag's heyday. It's interesting to note that when I recently spoke to a gentleman who repairs appliances, he said that washers are expected to last no more than 10-12 years these days. 

rickgtoc
User Rank
Gold
Re: Maytag's bringing back the extended warranty
rickgtoc   1/28/2013 5:18:03 PM
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In general, I agree with you, but on big ticket appliances, I've been better off with the extended warranty.  Bought an LG Front Loader washer and matching dryer in early '04.  Expected good service from the pair, but with $1600+ sunk in the purchase, the mfr warranty seemed short.  We bought the 4 year service agreement. When the initial service agreement expired 4 years later, I re-upped.  We had enough problems in the first 4 years that we clearly saved money via the extended warranty  And we made money off the second term of the agreement.  I was disappointed that we couldn't renew it for a third term.  For most of this time, the washer & dryer have served a 2-person household, not a family with 4 kids.  One of the repair techs even complimented us for not using too much detergent and for not abusing the door seals.  Still, we've replaced main drive motors, a dryer drum, circuit boards, and solenoid valves, among other parts in both machines.  My superstitious side will slap me for writing this, but we're now a year past the last term of extended warranty and haven't had a problem.  I'm actually very surprised.  I do know that at the next significant problem we will probably be looking at replacement rather than repair.  

My first washer lasted 20 years without repair -- and then the tub bolt holes corroded out, and we commended its spirit to the recycle yard.  The dryer purchased at the same time was still running when we gave it away at almost 25 years of age, having had one belt replacement as the only repair that I can recall.

The new models seem to be throwaways.  It's just a bit expensive to toss $1000 at a new washer every couple of years.  I'll at least consider the extended warranty on any new washer we buy.

apresher
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Blogger
Extended Warranties
apresher   1/28/2013 4:58:48 PM
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Ann, I generally don't buy extended warranties but hit the jackpot with a laptop a few years ago ($1300 gift card when they couldn't fix my Toshiba laptop due to parts obsolesence after three years of owning it) and $1,000 toward a new Sears treadmill for same reason (also more than five years old) for same reason.  But I think it was just luck because generally I don't go for them either.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Maytag's bringing back the extended warranty
Ann R. Thryft   1/28/2013 4:23:24 PM
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I never buy the extended warranties--they're always a waste of money. Looks like Maytag is making them necessary again.



Tom-R
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Gold
Re: Maytag Repairman
Tom-R   1/28/2013 3:29:09 PM
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I think most appliances are becoming disposable items now. The cost of any repair, if it requires outside labor, is usually more than a new unit. Yes, it may be a 39 cent part, and a Sherlock doing it themselves can reap those savings. But the majority of customers need to go the repairman route. Repairmen in turn have had to adopt plug and play repair methods that replace entire components, in an effort to cost effective. I have noticed more and more people replacing items simply because they want a newer version. Not because it failed. So if customers are looking for short lifespans on style or features, and prefer costs lower than repairs, this trend only makes sense.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Maytag Appliances
GTOlover   1/28/2013 1:27:10 PM
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Again, being a supplier to Whirlpool, some of the parts are made in Mexico and Asia and then assembled in the US. Careful how you believe "American" made. I should clarify that all the engineering support and manufacturing support continues to come from the US. So in that regard, we try to make sure that the parts made are of the highest quality as designed.

jcbond_mi
User Rank
Gold
Maytag Appliances
jcbond_mi   1/28/2013 11:11:17 AM
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While I was in college (1991-1995), I worked in appliances sales part time for a year.  We carried Whirlpool and Maytag, who were fierce rivals at the time.  Maytage was known for heavy duty construction - and a higher price tag.  What was interesting was that I had a talk with a Whirlpool rep about this.  She acknowledged the heavy duty construction, then said check the results of long-term testing in Consumer Reports.  And she was right - fewer problems over time with the Whirlpool products.  But both were good products.

Maytag went through financial difficulties and was eventually bought by Whirlpool, if I recall correctly.  And they don't appear to manufacture their own products anymore.  I'd guess Whirlpool would still be a good brand to buy, and they still manufacture in the US - although they probably outsource low-end products.

One company I find particularly disappointing is GE.  We moved into a home with all GE stainless steel appliances.  They've all had bizarre failures after moderate usage (IMO).  A freezer that just stops freezing every so often which leads to an impressive waterfall from the auto ice-maker.  A range top microwave that no longer works.  A dishwasher that washes much more poorly than our old one...

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Maytag Repairman
Nancy Golden   1/28/2013 10:44:47 AM
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Unfortunately I think the concept of "service friendly" is sitting on the same dusty shelf as "quality," and not just at Maytag. Lower cost imports have forced many companies to abandon what were core mission statements that they were founded on, in order to survive the competition where consumers are more interested in lower prices than in quality and repair accessibility. 

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Maytag Repairman
bob from maine   1/28/2013 10:42:56 AM
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Who is at fault, really? When you shop for a washer or dryer are you looking for an "old clunky" machine with no sound insulation? You'll probably choose the brand new gee-whiz one touch membrane keypad, guaranteed wrinkle-free shirt drying, energy reduced, with many db of sound insulation. If you look closely, you will likely find that the innards are very similar, after all there are only 2 or 3 dryer manufacturers and everyone buys and rebrands from those sources and those manufacturers offer four or five sets of options which you can mix and match to meet your specific price goals. None of those options include a 25 year life expectancy with guaranteed parts availability. The commercial dryers you see in the laundromats are designed to run more or less continuously for their ten year life expectancy with minimal maintenance but they cost 3 or 4 thousand dollars each. When I was in the market for a new dryer I asked my local repairman which brand he recommended. His answer: Rebuild your 42 year old dryer, new timer, new bearings, new belt and idler pulley, put bearings in the motor and it'll last another 25 years. Sage advice I'd say.

Ken E.
User Rank
Gold
I too am my own Maytag Repairman.
Ken E.   1/28/2013 10:36:19 AM
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I got a Maytag washer dryer as part of my wifes 'dowry', over thirty years ago.  I continue to make occasional minor repairs (belts, ignitors, lint filters, etc.) but absolutely major-trouble free.  You guys are making me think I should never consider replacing them.

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