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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The Desk is significant?
Ann R. Thryft   1/24/2013 12:10:29 PM
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DBrunermer, as we mentioned in the story, it's not clear how data is being transferred between one window and another. Since we can't see under the table, it's possible that there's some kind of hub where all the cables go where they communicate with each other, or it's possible there's some kind of wireless communication, possibly facilitated by electromagnetic tracking.

Charles Murray
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
Charles Murray   1/23/2013 7:58:06 PM
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I agree, Ann. There must be a wireless interface.

SparkyWatt
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
SparkyWatt   1/23/2013 4:44:26 PM
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Why don't we compromise on the dimensions and go with 5' 4".  That would support HD video.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Wireless?
Ann R. Thryft   1/23/2013 3:41:57 PM
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There may already be a wireless interface--it's not at all clear how the data is transferred between one window and another. That's one possible answer.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
Ann R. Thryft   1/23/2013 3:40:07 PM
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SparkyWatt, I've often said I wish I had a screen 3 feet high and 6 ft long. I'd prefer that, too. But I bet that's going to take a lot longer than something like this.

DBrunermer
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The Desk is significant?
DBrunermer   1/23/2013 2:05:48 PM
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I agree it looks interesting, but I disagree on the company's definition of 'Intuitive'. Bending a page backward to flip pages is not really obvious, nor is folding / dog-earing for fast forward and reverse on video. But I digress.

The movie makes it seem like the desk is an important part of this invention. As in, it's the desk that knows where the pages are in relation to each other, not the paper itself. To me, that's a huge limitation. That's not portable, even a little bit. I think instead they should make an electronic binding, like a regular book, with all interconnects in the 'spline', and the CPUs/WiFi in the front or back 'cover'. It could probably be as think as two kindles, and then be useful and portable. But this is an interesting device, all in all.

SparkyWatt
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
SparkyWatt   1/23/2013 1:39:23 PM
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In other words.  The advantage of this system is about the same as having a tablet screen that is 3 feet by 4 feet (roughly the size of a desktop).  Honestly, I think I would prefer the latter.  Especially if I could roll it up and take it with me.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
Ann R. Thryft   1/23/2013 11:38:58 AM
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The advantages are being able to lay out documents on a table, as we can do when they're made of paper, instead of having to look at everything sequentially on one screen. I have often wished to be able to do this, especially with long technical documents. Anyone who writes or does hands-on editing of such documents--words or drawings--could appreciate this, as could an R&D team that collaborates on same.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: I think I'm going to need a bigger desk
Ann R. Thryft   1/23/2013 11:38:07 AM
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It's not really all that complicated: what may be confusing is that it mixes the physical handling of sheets of "paper" with the same old functions of electronics.

tmash
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Iron
Hmmm
tmash   1/23/2013 9:54:55 AM
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Very interesting breakthrough there...however tho nothing new with the underlying technologies its an extension of what has been there in the last four years ..

The market for this is limited to environments for learning and work or the traditional shopping nfc applications....beyond that??...its called innovation.

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