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Elizabeth M
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Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/15/2013 5:13:07 AM
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This is a great innovation. I personally try to use more energy efficient light bulbs but am one of the people that doesn't like that harsh light--I prefer dim lamp lighting or candles to the "hospital white" mentioned in the article. If I and others like me could have the best of both worlds this would really catch on.

TJ McDermott
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Re: Great innovation
TJ McDermott   1/15/2013 12:10:25 PM
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Elizabeth, I agree - I much prefer the warm yellow light offered by incandescents.  I look forward to this technique being offered in the very near future.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/15/2013 12:12:12 PM
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This is potential good news for those of us who are sensitive to light color--not everyone is, it turns out. Those greenish CFLs make everyone look like zombies to me, and harsh LEDs give me a headache. But NXP's Surdeanu needs a history lesson: we're used to the warm light of the sun and firelight after a few million--not a thousand--years. And that's what natural spectrum lights are all about--they emphasize the reds we're wired for.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/16/2013 7:11:36 AM
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Indeed, Ann, a bit of a history lesson is necessary...I guess I never thought about why many humans are so adverse to harsh light but it certainly makes sense! Not to mention the associations with bright white lighting (hospitals, as mentioned, and to me they also remind me of unpleasant days in a school room!). What is it exactly that makes some of us sensitive to light color and others not so much, do you know?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/16/2013 12:16:55 PM
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The history lesson I was referring to was the unit of millions, not a thousand, years: just a few orders of magnitude, that's all! Re what makes some of us more sensitive to colored light than others, I don't know and I'm not sure it's been looked into. There are many variations like that among humans that haven't been studied much. If anyone does know about this one, I'm interested in learning.

tekochip
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Platinum
Re: Great innovation
tekochip   8/28/2013 3:32:39 PM
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That's a really clever technique.  I worked with a pinball company (OK, there's really only ONE pinball company), and their solution was to mix additional colors in with the white LEDs to make them look a little less ghostly.  Reflectors were also used to warm the white LEDs up a little bit.  As you can imagine there are quite a few bulbs in a pinball machine and finding a solution was really important.
 
White LEDs did make great replacement for flashers, which was really a 12V bulb hit with 24V, as you can imagine, they wear out pretty fast.


Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/16/2013 7:42:10 PM
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Good point, Ann. a similar phenomena can happen with LEDs. NXP told me that if you don't correct for temperature, an LED can give off a pink-ish or blue-ish light.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/17/2013 1:02:39 PM
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It's funny, LEDs don't bug me nearly as much. Greenish CFL light makes people look like zombies and I actually find it depressing and/or nauseating. But warm colors are a lot better--that's part of what makes natural spectrum bulbs so efficient in raising mood and lowering blood pressure for some of us.The problem I have with LEDs is they're so harsh--they give me eyestrain pretty quickly.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/17/2013 2:55:12 PM
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Yes, for sure, I'd like to know as well. For me, I have been tested to have very light-sensitive eyes in general (I've been a contact lense wearer for 30 years, though I'm not sure that has anything to do with it). I'm not sure if light sensitivity has anything to do with light-spectrum sensitivity in particular, though. Perhaps a Google search is in order! Will report back any pertinent findings...

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/18/2013 11:46:44 AM
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I have light-sensitive eyes, too, as well as light spectrum sensitive. I wear dark glasses in sunlight and sometimes on cloudy days, too. Whether there's a connection between those hadn't occurred to me. Interesting question.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:42:06 PM
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Good point, Ann. Many of the old-fashioned fluorescent bulbs gave off the same, weird greenish glow.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/28/2013 12:12:21 PM
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It's not just the old-fashioned fluorescent bulbs that have that awful greenish glow but also the CFLs--those were the ones I was referring to. I agree with William K--there should be variety and choice, not only for different people, but for different uses. The cold white light of LEDs is great for seeing fine details.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   2/4/2013 7:31:46 PM
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Yes, choice is good, Ann. I have a cold white LED bulb in my office. About a year ago, I unscrewed it and replaced it with an incandescent.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   2/6/2013 2:52:20 PM
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Those white LED bulbs can cause eyestrain over long periods--they're just too harsh, although ideal for short periods of intense scrutiny when looking at fine detail.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   8/27/2013 6:12:33 PM
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I agree, Ann. Are those LEDs bright? Yes. Pleasant? No.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   8/28/2013 12:20:28 PM
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I don't remember the details, but I have seen ads about better, more naturally-colored LED-based light bulbs recently, so there's hope.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Re: Great innovation
Jack Rupert, PE   2/25/2013 3:45:11 PM
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I intend to do something similar, Charles.  At the moment, I'm in a temporary location, but when if the lighting is similar when I get a permanent home, I expect to be getting myself a desklamp that will throw some warmer light on my work area.  My previous company actually supplied halogen desklamps for that purpose and one of the part-time student admins who works for me already brought in an incandescent light for this purpose.

naperlou
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Engineered innovation
naperlou   1/15/2013 10:08:03 AM
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Chuck, this is a good example of an engineered innovation.  By putting together these three aspects of the LED lighting they are able to come up with something that consumers actually want.  Unlike older lighting technologies, LED lighting is more highly engineered.  There are a lot mote parameters that can be controlled.

William K.
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Platinum
"warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/17/2013 8:30:10 PM
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IT is fine for some folks to prefer the cave-like dim glow, but please don't assume that everybody likes that effect. I have always liked the more frosty white type of light because it allows for seeing things, especially details, much more clearly. The biggest problem that I see right now with LED lighting is the incorrect assumption that everybody likes and must have that yellowish cast light, and that nobody would ever like the frosty white illumination. 

But fads come and go and in a while there will be a different shade of light in favor. That is the way things change, and the way that they have been for quite a while.

The other thingthat I see is that for quite a few general illumination applications tere is really no need to make all of the lights exactly the same color spectrum. So there would be a real market for those devices that did not fit into the very narrow bins that seem to be keeping the price of devices higher than they really need to be. How about offering us a line of lights that have a braoder spread of colors, and aloso a lower price. It could be a benefit to a lot of us.

Charles Murray
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:38:58 PM
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I agree, William K. When I'm working -- by that I mean reading and writing -- I want frosty white light. Light preference depends on the application.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/18/2013 9:11:37 PM
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The wonderful thing is that we live in a free country and we don't have to be all the same. Of course some stores that I have seen would not give that impresion. Why should I have only one choice, that of "warm white" light? Is nobody brave enough to offere a product other than what marketing has decided is what the masses will be offered?

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
Jack Rupert, PE   1/26/2013 5:30:25 PM
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Unfortunately, William K. you are only partially correct.  This wouldn't even be such an important discussion if we were allowed to choose the lighting type we wanted based on color, preference, costing, efficiency or whatever is most important to the individual.  However, the free market was stepped on with others telling us what those priorities should be...and which "better mousetrap" we HAVE to buy.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/26/2013 8:43:41 PM
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Jack, it seems that you are correct. I forgot about our legislative body's decisions that were made based on all of those emotions. They seldom let reason and intellect interfere with their process, and so now we are stuch with that pale orange glow lighting.

Forgive me, I was thinking rationally. I hope that the lighting police are not on their way just yet.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
mrdon   1/20/2013 8:04:26 PM
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William K, I agree. I was always curious about the number of customers wanting warm color lighting versus the cool look while developing LED light kits for Hunter Fans. I personally like white light while working in the lab and at my desk. White light makes desktop and wall surfaces brighter for seeing small color bands on resistors and IC part numbers. Here's a video of the NXP demo presented at this years CES conference. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRieORS6g1w&feature=youtu.be

William K.
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/21/2013 8:27:58 PM
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The "you tube" light demonstration was interesting, and it looks like they have done well in emulating an incandescent light bulb. They are half way there. Now all that is needed is a means to control the whiteness of the light independantly of the intensity. Perhaps they never thought about that option.

Of course, by emulating the light bulb they did avoid having to add more wires. I am probably one of the very few who would be quite willing to revise my wiring to support more flexible colors of lighting. Of course, being qualified, willing, and able is a rare thing in this day and age.

Gorski
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Platinum
Warm LED Light
Gorski   2/9/2013 3:44:01 PM
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I think this is a step in the right direction. Dimmable LED lights that are "warm" would be a great product for the home, much less cars. I have many dimmable lights in my home. Alas, all are incandescent. The dimmable LEDs available have a very narrow "dimming range."

 

GORSKI PE



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