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Elizabeth M
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Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/15/2013 5:13:07 AM
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This is a great innovation. I personally try to use more energy efficient light bulbs but am one of the people that doesn't like that harsh light--I prefer dim lamp lighting or candles to the "hospital white" mentioned in the article. If I and others like me could have the best of both worlds this would really catch on.

naperlou
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Engineered innovation
naperlou   1/15/2013 10:08:03 AM
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Chuck, this is a good example of an engineered innovation.  By putting together these three aspects of the LED lighting they are able to come up with something that consumers actually want.  Unlike older lighting technologies, LED lighting is more highly engineered.  There are a lot mote parameters that can be controlled.

TJ McDermott
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Re: Great innovation
TJ McDermott   1/15/2013 12:10:25 PM
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Elizabeth, I agree - I much prefer the warm yellow light offered by incandescents.  I look forward to this technique being offered in the very near future.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/15/2013 12:12:12 PM
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This is potential good news for those of us who are sensitive to light color--not everyone is, it turns out. Those greenish CFLs make everyone look like zombies to me, and harsh LEDs give me a headache. But NXP's Surdeanu needs a history lesson: we're used to the warm light of the sun and firelight after a few million--not a thousand--years. And that's what natural spectrum lights are all about--they emphasize the reds we're wired for.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/16/2013 7:11:36 AM
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Indeed, Ann, a bit of a history lesson is necessary...I guess I never thought about why many humans are so adverse to harsh light but it certainly makes sense! Not to mention the associations with bright white lighting (hospitals, as mentioned, and to me they also remind me of unpleasant days in a school room!). What is it exactly that makes some of us sensitive to light color and others not so much, do you know?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/16/2013 12:16:55 PM
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The history lesson I was referring to was the unit of millions, not a thousand, years: just a few orders of magnitude, that's all! Re what makes some of us more sensitive to colored light than others, I don't know and I'm not sure it's been looked into. There are many variations like that among humans that haven't been studied much. If anyone does know about this one, I'm interested in learning.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/16/2013 7:42:10 PM
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Good point, Ann. a similar phenomena can happen with LEDs. NXP told me that if you don't correct for temperature, an LED can give off a pink-ish or blue-ish light.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/17/2013 1:02:39 PM
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It's funny, LEDs don't bug me nearly as much. Greenish CFL light makes people look like zombies and I actually find it depressing and/or nauseating. But warm colors are a lot better--that's part of what makes natural spectrum bulbs so efficient in raising mood and lowering blood pressure for some of us.The problem I have with LEDs is they're so harsh--they give me eyestrain pretty quickly.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/17/2013 2:55:12 PM
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Yes, for sure, I'd like to know as well. For me, I have been tested to have very light-sensitive eyes in general (I've been a contact lense wearer for 30 years, though I'm not sure that has anything to do with it). I'm not sure if light sensitivity has anything to do with light-spectrum sensitivity in particular, though. Perhaps a Google search is in order! Will report back any pertinent findings...

William K.
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Platinum
"warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/17/2013 8:30:10 PM
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IT is fine for some folks to prefer the cave-like dim glow, but please don't assume that everybody likes that effect. I have always liked the more frosty white type of light because it allows for seeing things, especially details, much more clearly. The biggest problem that I see right now with LED lighting is the incorrect assumption that everybody likes and must have that yellowish cast light, and that nobody would ever like the frosty white illumination. 

But fads come and go and in a while there will be a different shade of light in favor. That is the way things change, and the way that they have been for quite a while.

The other thingthat I see is that for quite a few general illumination applications tere is really no need to make all of the lights exactly the same color spectrum. So there would be a real market for those devices that did not fit into the very narrow bins that seem to be keeping the price of devices higher than they really need to be. How about offering us a line of lights that have a braoder spread of colors, and aloso a lower price. It could be a benefit to a lot of us.

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