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William K.
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/21/2013 8:27:58 PM
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The "you tube" light demonstration was interesting, and it looks like they have done well in emulating an incandescent light bulb. They are half way there. Now all that is needed is a means to control the whiteness of the light independantly of the intensity. Perhaps they never thought about that option.

Of course, by emulating the light bulb they did avoid having to add more wires. I am probably one of the very few who would be quite willing to revise my wiring to support more flexible colors of lighting. Of course, being qualified, willing, and able is a rare thing in this day and age.

mrdon
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Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
mrdon   1/20/2013 8:04:26 PM
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William K, I agree. I was always curious about the number of customers wanting warm color lighting versus the cool look while developing LED light kits for Hunter Fans. I personally like white light while working in the lab and at my desk. White light makes desktop and wall surfaces brighter for seeing small color bands on resistors and IC part numbers. Here's a video of the NXP demo presented at this years CES conference. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRieORS6g1w&feature=youtu.be

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/18/2013 9:11:37 PM
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The wonderful thing is that we live in a free country and we don't have to be all the same. Of course some stores that I have seen would not give that impresion. Why should I have only one choice, that of "warm white" light? Is nobody brave enough to offere a product other than what marketing has decided is what the masses will be offered?

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:42:06 PM
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Good point, Ann. Many of the old-fashioned fluorescent bulbs gave off the same, weird greenish glow.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:38:58 PM
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I agree, William K. When I'm working -- by that I mean reading and writing -- I want frosty white light. Light preference depends on the application.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/18/2013 11:46:44 AM
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I have light-sensitive eyes, too, as well as light spectrum sensitive. I wear dark glasses in sunlight and sometimes on cloudy days, too. Whether there's a connection between those hadn't occurred to me. Interesting question.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
"warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/17/2013 8:30:10 PM
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IT is fine for some folks to prefer the cave-like dim glow, but please don't assume that everybody likes that effect. I have always liked the more frosty white type of light because it allows for seeing things, especially details, much more clearly. The biggest problem that I see right now with LED lighting is the incorrect assumption that everybody likes and must have that yellowish cast light, and that nobody would ever like the frosty white illumination. 

But fads come and go and in a while there will be a different shade of light in favor. That is the way things change, and the way that they have been for quite a while.

The other thingthat I see is that for quite a few general illumination applications tere is really no need to make all of the lights exactly the same color spectrum. So there would be a real market for those devices that did not fit into the very narrow bins that seem to be keeping the price of devices higher than they really need to be. How about offering us a line of lights that have a braoder spread of colors, and aloso a lower price. It could be a benefit to a lot of us.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/17/2013 2:55:12 PM
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Yes, for sure, I'd like to know as well. For me, I have been tested to have very light-sensitive eyes in general (I've been a contact lense wearer for 30 years, though I'm not sure that has anything to do with it). I'm not sure if light sensitivity has anything to do with light-spectrum sensitivity in particular, though. Perhaps a Google search is in order! Will report back any pertinent findings...

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/17/2013 1:02:39 PM
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It's funny, LEDs don't bug me nearly as much. Greenish CFL light makes people look like zombies and I actually find it depressing and/or nauseating. But warm colors are a lot better--that's part of what makes natural spectrum bulbs so efficient in raising mood and lowering blood pressure for some of us.The problem I have with LEDs is they're so harsh--they give me eyestrain pretty quickly.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/16/2013 7:42:10 PM
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Good point, Ann. a similar phenomena can happen with LEDs. NXP told me that if you don't correct for temperature, an LED can give off a pink-ish or blue-ish light.

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