HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 11/12  >  >>
Quacker
User Rank
Bronze
It's not the guns, Stupid.
Quacker   12/12/2012 10:11:46 AM
No, I'm not happy that people will be able to make their own guns that much more easily. But what is by far, the most disturbing is the KIND of weapons that can be easily fabricated. Assault, fully automatic, melee, even ultra-high capacity magazines for existing weapons. All the illegal stuff. This isn't funny. And the difficulty in preventing the proliferation of proven, working designs is spine-chilling. Trivialize this at the risk of real mayhem.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: much ado about nothing
ChasChas   12/12/2012 10:09:15 AM
 

We all know that cars are far more dangerous than guns. The good Lord help us if they ever come up with a printed car!

atemp
User Rank
Silver
Re: much ado about nothing
atemp   12/12/2012 9:39:52 AM
Weapons have several uses: hunting, exercising terror & compulsion over others (by government and lone or organized sociopaths), and defense against the latter and tyranny by freedom-loving individuals. None of these is going to change by hysterically banning printed weapons.

Constitution_man
User Rank
Gold
Re: much ado about nothing
Constitution_man   12/12/2012 9:23:47 AM
Ho flippin' Hum.  Can we get back to covering ENGINEERING and DESIGN issues and quit playing with milky-toast lamby-pie leftist political worries??  I am not joking.  Every engineer & designer I know [roughly 250] really find this kind of article/commentary a complete waste of 1's and 0's.  B O R I N G  and Irrelevant.  Grow up already.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: much ado about nothing
Dave Palmer   12/11/2012 5:22:09 PM
@Cabe: Organized crime has no problem operating chop shops for stolen cars, so I don't think they'd have any problem making receivers for firearms, if they were so inclined.  They probably already have the equipment.  An AK-47 receiver is a relatively simple stamping.  If there were money in making them, they'd be doing it already.

Right now, it's so easy for organized criminals to get illegal weapons that they have no motivation to make them themselves.  I don't see this situation changing in the near future.

I could be wrong, but I don't think gangs are going to be buying up 3D printers anytime soon. 

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: much ado about nothing
GTOlover   12/11/2012 4:35:31 PM
NO RATINGS
I think you meant to say illegal guns are easy to come by in Chicago.

akwaman
User Rank
Gold
Re: much ado about nothing
akwaman   12/11/2012 3:42:40 PM
NO RATINGS
To GTOlover:  Old Goats are awesome!  Elequent use of vocabulary... but you mis-spelled "repeal". lol

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: much ado about nothing
Cabe Atwell   12/11/2012 3:41:19 PM
Popuptarget,

Yes, anyone with a machine shop can make gun parts. But that requires a lot of investment in time, money, and learning. With 3D printers, they are very inexpensive and require very little skill to operate. Load the optimized file and hit "GO." I think the main issue is accessibility.

I am also from Chicago, and (illegal) guns are very easy to come across. But with printed parts, no one ever has to know what you are up to. Sometimes... the law enforcement can stop illegal street sales of firearms. But, will they bust someone for having a 3D printer? Doubtful.

Times are a changin'

C

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: much ado about nothing
GTOlover   12/11/2012 2:02:38 PM
It is always the object that kills and never the responsibility of the user? So politicians consume political clout to villify the object and the person that pulled the trigger is a victum of the 'gun' culture.

The printing of any object should be interesting and worthwhile. However, trying to repeel open and honest research of legal persons and the subjugation of such will lead to hidden and subversive research from persons of questionable goals. I would rather see this in the open.

akwaman
User Rank
Gold
Re: much ado about nothing
akwaman   12/11/2012 1:52:56 PM
I couldn't agree more with popuptarget. I know several people who have fully automatic weapons they made illegally... without a 3D Printer.  Let's face it, it is far easier and less expensive to get the parts you need for your automatic weapon from other sources, 3D printing them is done strickly for fun.  Let's not get too carried away with this story, after all, no matter what you invent, some idiot will find some illegal, immoral, or dangerous way to use it.   

<<  <  Page 11/12  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Last year you helped Design News and Allied Electronics crown its first-ever Gadget Freak of the Year, and we need your help again. Vote in round 2 of our second-annual contest.
The key to autonomous driving is not to forget about the driver, and to remember that passengers want a sense of control, as opposed to being utterly passive backseat drivers.
HP revealed more of its 3D printing plans in a recent webinar. Senior vice president of inkjet and graphics solution business Stephen Nigro spoke about how the technology works and expanded on HP's vision of open collaboration to commercialize its Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology for end-production, and open collaboration on new materials. He also said HP will create software to help users decide when to use Multi Jet Fusion versus conventional subtractive manufacturing.
Get a load of these strange product designs. What's in the water these design engineers are drinking?
The Dutch are known for their love of bicycling, and they’ve also long been early adopters of green-energy and smart-city technologies. So it seems fitting that a town in which painter Vincent van Gogh once lived has given him a very Dutch-like tribute -- a bike path lit by a special smart paint in the style of the artist's “Starry Night” painting.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service