HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: CLOUD COMPUTIING
Mydesign   12/28/2012 5:27:37 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Bob, we are using cloud in our company for various purposes. One example is we had hosted our design service in a central server and all the design engineers can access, modify or reprint the design modules through internal cloud.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
CLOUD COMPUTIING
bobjengr   12/21/2012 4:32:04 PM
NO RATINGS
 If I may, let me ask--do you see the cloud; i.e. cloud computing, being  the direction engineering documentation is going?  I retired from a Fortune 500 company and we had bank after bank of storage for our CAD data--drawings, sketches, etc etc.  Accessing that storage was not that difficult but when all of the CAD files migrated to India, it really became a problem.  Access was take a number. How would the cloud alleviate that problem or would it?

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: As old as "Apple-Share" circa 1988
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   12/20/2012 2:18:30 PM
NO RATINGS
I have learned that –(  In general  ) – the more prolific or pervasive a phenomenon becomes, that the "public masses" will latch onto anything that more easily helps them to understand it better.

Case in Point:  have you seen the newest Verizon TV commercials that depict 4G connectivity from a smartphone-?  It shows a laboratory of scientists in white jackets pulling the proverbial Dr. Frankenstein electro-lever to unleash a bolt of lightning into the anxious, waiting 4G customer's new smartphone. 

Ridiculous.  The lightning bolt must have come from "The Cloud".

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: As old as "Apple-Share" circa 1988
Mydesign   12/18/2012 11:23:29 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
"I'm just trying to preach the understanding that the "The Cloud" is merely the growth of the internet phenomenon"

Jim, you are right.  It's another offering from IT due to its potential growth. Eventhough we are using cloud offerings in different ways (Gmail, Picasso, Google doc etc), now only peoples started marketing the buzz word "Cloud".

akwaman
User Rank
Gold
Re: Design inthe cloud
akwaman   12/12/2012 10:28:56 AM
NO RATINGS
I always thought that you designed in the Cloud when you smoked a little too much weed before work!  I think that played a part in some of the world's greatest discoveries!

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Designing in the cloud, or "lost in the fog"?
William K.   12/11/2012 8:49:07 PM
NO RATINGS
The cloud sounds a lot like a remote server, only not all in one place. Using a program of some kind that resides someplace else, and storing files in a manner that probably does not allow them to be accessed except through that particular program, and really not having any way to really know just where those files actually are, or who else may wind up with access to them, that is what the cloud sounds like to me. A great idea "except for a few small problems", and having to pay somebody for services that may or not have a value great enough to justify what we are paying.

So my evaluation of "the cloud" is perhaps a bit less trusting than many. After all, the cloud undoubtedly uses a few "buggy" programs from that company with thye buggy reputation. 

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cloud = Data Storage
NadineJ   12/11/2012 3:41:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Well said.  I think that's the literal definition.  Many "interpret" the cloud in multiple ways to justify their business practices.

cwarner7_11
User Rank
Iron
Design inthe cloud
cwarner7_11   12/11/2012 3:37:24 PM
NO RATINGS
To me, the "Cloud" looks suspiciously like how we used to do things thirty or more years ago- one would punch up a deck of cards, then transmit the data via a telephone modem to a centralized computer, then wait for the computer to spit back the results.  (this was way before Al Gore invented the internet).  Granted, communications speeds have improved by several orders of magnitude, and data entry methods have become a bit more user friendly, but the process is essentially the same- the real design work is done by the operator at the terminal, not by whatever processor is chosen to assimilate the data into human-readable form (i.e., graphics renderings of lists of points, edges, volumes, etc.).  And with the power of today's PC workstations, I don't see any compelling need to offload the work to a remote server, unless you are designing a large, intricate system.  Even with large, intricate systems, I venture that the design process begins at the same point my much simpler design projects begin- hand sketches on paper.  The tools have improved significantly over the years, but the process is the same...

Now, as to "renting" software rather than buying it:  design software, and analysis software such as FAE, CFD, multi-physics simulations, etc., are all very complicated, and one does not gain expertise in a few minutes at a terminal.  It takes months to become profecient with a particular software package, and, usually, several days to re-aclimatize oneself to the latest "required" upgrade from the typical software developer.  this issue is especially important for the "casual" user...  

If one relies on a third party to maintain the software, one loses control over the upgrade cycle, and may find that one must spend time relearning becasue the software package has changed.  Then, there is the issue of version compatibility (I still maintain a Win 98SE system becasue I need access to "ancient" work that was created with software in a format that newer packages cannot access).  Will you be able to access your data five years from now?

And, of course, the Internet is not always available when you need your data.  Just ask the victims of Sandy how long it took to regain access to their cloud-stored data...

Overall, I see "cloud computing" as a marketing scheme for generating new revenue streams for products that are generally over-priced in the first place.

JimRW
User Rank
Silver
Cloud = Data Storage
JimRW   12/11/2012 12:34:05 PM
IMO, the cloud is nothing more than a means to offload mass data storage to a 3rd party. So, if you design in the cloud your data is stored there and anyone with credentials has access to it. The innovation, if we want to call it that, is the use of todays faster internet connections to make it workable.

I think it's a natural evolution of internet business, and what makes it a good thing is smaller companies (like the one I work for) can keep resources more concentrated on core, value added tasks and less on overhead. 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: As old as "Apple-Share" circa 1988
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   12/11/2012 9:49:23 AM
NO RATINGS
Point taken, and I agree -- I get the advantages – for example, being able to subscribe to a Finite Element Analysis application – essentially "renting" vs. buying software. 

I'm just trying to preach the understanding that the "The Cloud" is merely the growth of the internet phenomenon – (,,,,originally invented by Al Gore ! )   ;-)

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
These are the toys that inspired budding engineers to try out sublime designs, create miniature structures, and experiment with bizarre contraptions using sets that could be torn down and reconstructed over and over.
Connected sensor-enabled applications will improve the consumer experience -- and generate new revenue streams.
PowerStream is deploying the microgrid at its headquarters to demonstrate how people can generate and distribute their own energy and make their homes and businesses more sustainable through renewables.
Printrbot unveils its all-metal Printrbot Simple, bringing durability to low-cost 3D printers.
Today's robots should be respected, and humans should be wary of their growing skills and sophistication. Quite simply, robots are better than us in a lot of ways. Here are 10 of them.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service