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Good presentation - the entire class / week.  Lots of good tips and ideas.  Needed the refresher and got some new ideas and saw some clever concepts in the code segments, will have to check out your book for summer reading I suppose ...

Is there a way to download the audio for the presentation? I can get the PPT but I am not sure if thre is anyway to listen download audio for these lectures.... Thanks for your help.

Thanks and have a happy new year!

Iron

A fine week of lectures...

Iron

code for Switch testing is definately useful.

Iron

I think modular programming is different than reusable code.

Iron

All information is great, most valuable topic was about switches testing

@Gary - it does support

Iron

@Gary - did not get the question re. test case failing causes it to pass? (talking about false positive/false negative???)

Iron

Great to have access to the recorded sessions

Iron

Missed the live lecture again

Iron

thanks for a good week of lectures

Bye

I think the most useful was the comments about not using switches accross large blocks of code

I am not aware of any testing with this feature

I think the discussion of reuseable code when using a higher order language needs to include refactoring of the code to reduce methods to smaller (1 page or less) blocks of code which can be pulled out to a generic library. These libraries can be shared accross different projects

Looking forward to today. I can understand why thier is a large interest

in this topic

Thanks Gary; very interesting week session

Iron

The most useful parts of the week were how and where to adapt code to varying environments and hardware. I take hardware and software reuse to heart. You've provided a few more tools for my design and problem solving toolbox. I lead projects where hardware, firmware, features and support software design are very closely coupled in a small design team.  Propogating of good ideas, not just getting a product out the door is a thread in my leadership style.

 

Three of my team mates have attended this week.

 

Thank you Gary.

Iron

@gongji: How to guess the combinations of features to test when you don't how a customer would use it is a good questions. In a printer, for example, we could print a page on letter paper at 600 DPI single-sided. And we could print on ledger paper at 300 DPI double-sided. And many other combinations of settings for the print job. I wrote a random tester which randomly set about 20 parameters and then tried to print page. We did find one obscure defect with that method. But was it enough? I came across this article, "Combinatorial Software Testing" in IEEE's Computer August 2009 magazine that addressed that very topic. I downloaded their ACTS software (http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/acts/) and played with it, but as is typical, real work interfered with research for a better way.

Iron

@asdurey: Tools for automated low-level function testing: Those tools are fewer because you are talking about code in kernel space (as oppposed to application space)  and code that accesses hw, and so the test harness would have to support stubs for kernel-space stubs and simulated hw.

Iron

Best comment in Code ever was (Nosey, aren't you!)

 

Thanks Gary!

Iron

The key to the good documentation result is capturing meaning. Just getting the right line to go to the right state at the right time is only the tip of the iceberg. Implementation (mechanical, electrical, PLC, relay logic, firmware) is the solution, not the description or spec. The problem is in the teaching and use of good communications skills (IMHO).

@Lawson I think you are correct that it was a maintenance programmer working on code he had not written.

Iron

@GStringham:  I can't thank you enough for you help.

Iron

Have a great day everybody. "See" many of you in two weeks.

Iron

@gongji: Having good nameing rules helps readability, debugging, and maintenence, which needs to happen whether the code would be reusable or not.

Iron

Thanks, Gary for a great progrm. And thanks everyone for your participation.

Blogger

@RoboPaint: What software tools do I prefer? Isn't that like asking a chef what kitchen utensil he or she prefers? I've used vi, gvim, PSPad, NotePad, awk, grep, sed, sh, ksh, bash, Visual Studios, make, cc, cygwin, Word, Visio, Excel, Paint.net, Solitaire, Chrome, iTunes, and so on. What's funny is while I'm in MS Word, I can write text just fine. When I'm in vi (or gvim) I can write code just fine. But when I try to write a code snippet in my Word doc, I can't do that. I keep trying to hit escape and then use h, j, k, and l to move around. :-)

Iron

Hate having to write comments like that one. If I find myself doing it, I put on my Sherlock Holmes hat and go sleuthing for what's going on. Sometimes, it drives our hardware guys batty to have to go dig up why they did what they did and how it works but I get them to do it. I do not do magic fudge factors and trick code without thoroughly explaining them in comments.

Iron

For a very rih sopurce of those sorts of funny programmer comments google :

HARRY_READ_ME.txt

On anenglishmanscastle. I often go there and search for "Argh" -- it has given me many hours of chuckles.

Iron

@GStringham  So far all of the products I have been involved in are in the prototype phase, although we have been through several revisions of a couple of them.  But, since I am learning all of this now, I should be all set for future versions :)

Iron

@rlallier Interesting (and good) take on that comment.  I was thinking more along the lines that the comment was written by a software guy who wasn't the original code author.  He was tasked with maintaining the code and was adding comments as he figured things out.  He didn't see the point of that code and tried removing it, but found that made it fail!  I've been in that position a few times.  I've probably written some dumb comments like that too!

Iron

Bye all and happy holidays

Happy Holidays to members in USA :) 

Iron

Thanks, Gary. I've learned a few new things, but especially a few new ways to think about reuse.

Iron

@Brandon: I'm guessing from your comments that you are working on a brand-new product, Version 1.0. You'll start to see reusabilty stuff when you work on your Version 2.0 hw which needs Version 2.0 code, (which, of course, is totally reusable from your 1.0 product, right? :-)

Iron

Thanks Gary for the feedback on my features combination question. However, I design chips for consumer electronics market (cellphone). You never know how your customers will use your chip. We do randomization on all features combination, but we can only cover so many cases. It is very time-consuming and there is no guarantee. I am wondering if you have ever come across such problem.

Iron

@casner: Yes, there are a lot of good comments and ideas on these posts. I have thought about compiling them and enhancing this course if the demand (and $$) is there.

Iron

@casner LOL Someone hasn't talked to the hardware engineers enough. It's "funny" (not really) to run across comments and code which give evidence that the software engineer didn't exactly understand the functionality of the hardware he was working on and just "winged it" because of things the hardware engineer told him he had to do to "make it work." Can't make software people too embarassed to ask questions! Knew a hardware engineer who could be very intimidating. Caused the software guys to presume things because they were chicken to reveal, through questions, that they didn't know exactly how the hardware worked. I wasn't afraid to ask the "dumb" questions, because I always figured if I couldn't explain what I was doing in the comments, then I didn't have a good grasp of what was going on myself.

Iron

"Don't know what this does, but it fails if this is not here"

I think that was in "Harry Readme"

 

Iron

@casner At least they're honest!

Iron

I once saw a comment for assembler code that said "Divide by seven, you figure it out".

Worst comment in purchased code, "Don't know what this does, but it fails if this is not here"

Iron

@gongji: You don't need to test every combination of swtiches. In my example, Feature A and B are related somehow so those should be tested in all combinations. But if Feature C is unlrelated, there is no need to test C with all combinations and permutations of A and B.

Iron

When I wrote test procedures it was so anybody off the street could run them.  With repair manuals it was almost the same way.  Coding comments should be verbose enough that anybody can understand them (even yourself) weeks after they are written.

Iron

Value for me this week has been learning CPP tricks. I've always used it, but have never pushed it to its max.

Biggest hit for me this week is:
#define PRT_DEBUG(a) printf a
W.O.W. - My code is filled with multi-line debug output, which screws readability. I'm going to use this to reduce all that crap to one-liners.

Very nice to get something out of a class I can put to use immediately. Thanks, Gary!

Iron

Great lecture Gary.  Using preprocesor directives to expand the scope of the code so it can be reusable was most helpful for me

Iron

Are there any tools for automated low-level function testing that you would recommended?

Iron

Good series of lectures. The company where I work is making a big push for continuous improvement. These kinds of education programs to help with continuing process improvement for software development are helpful.

Iron

@tniles Yeah, I do that sometimes during development to verify an algorithm is correct.  However, what I can't get is support from management to create a full test suite (of these test functions) that can be used for regresssion testing.  We're always behind schedule and nobody wants to "pay it forward," so we keep doing manual testing (or none at all depending on how much the sales manager is yelling for the new feature or bug fix).

Iron

Rob, thanks for posting the slide we're on.  When the sound cuts out I lose track until I can get it back.

Iron

@abarman I know what you mean about the streaming. IT where I am worked hard to get our corporate network from blocking it, and even then, we had that cut-out problem. I used our guest wi-fi access and network to log on to get around the blocking and unreliability. Unusual. YouTube videos come in just fine on the corporate network.

Iron

Thanks Gary. Really enjoyed the series.

Iron

ASIC development is becoming more and more software-like (writing RTL code). Reuse is a big requirement for us too. Lots of parameters in our design and strict naming rules. I didn't hear anything about naming rules in your presentation. Is that important in the software world too? I would think so...

 

Iron

Thanks Gary !  and Rob for EET sponsorship.

Iron

Best series ever, very useful. Thank you Gary and Rob.

Iron

Thx Gary and Rob. I read your book Hardware/Firmware interface design. Very useful!

Iron

@GStringham: Coffee is the desert, the lecture is the main course.  We can get by without desert.

Iron

Thank  you for your time preparing and presenting the lecture.  I do not do software design but it was aninteresting look into the applications

 

Iron

thank realy good info - thank you

Iron

The whole week of Gary's lectures are now archived on the Digi-Key Continuing Education Center page on Design News.

Blogger

Thanks Gary.  I curious to know what software tools you prefer??

Iron

Seeing the examples here has reminded me how much code reuse we do here.

Iron

Gary thank you for all lectures, all were very interesting.

Thank you for hosting Rob.

Thank you Digikey for sponsoring 

Iron

Good lecture. Lots of pearls of wisdom in here to contemplate and incorporate in my own practices.

Iron

Thanks Gary and Rob!

Iron

Thanks, great presentation

Iron

I had to keep restarting the sound throughout the lecture.

Iron

Thanks for another great session and great series

Gary & Rob Thanks Very much for a Great Week!

Iron

Thank you Gary and Rob.Happy Thanksgiving to all.

Iron

In general the lectures were useful to understand what's happenning in industry in general about code reuse in embedded products. It helped me a lot to confirm that we are in the right path and we have to continue this this effort of producing reusable software components; it benefits everybody, not just internally to reduce development time an cost but also our customers

Thank you for taking to the time to provide such a great lecture

Iron

Thanks Bob and Gary.

Iron

The same to you, Gary

 

Iron

Most useful, CPP switching with #else for catching the bad code.

Iron

Thanks Gary. Great week.

Blogger

Thank you ver much, Gary! This has been a great class. I learned a lot!

Iron

Testing and reuse practices

Thank you to Gary and Rob for this week.

Iron

Examples of compile time directives.

Iron

Dealing with contract developers with a long term view and constructing code for reuse.

Iron

Fantastic series, Gary.  Thank you! 

Iron

dual-level, top level selects features

testing

forcing compile-time errors to check proper defines

Iron

link did not work for me either

 

Iron

Thank you for a great presentation!

Iron

software reuse makes me think how software engineering is a real professional discipline.

Iron

Being a board designer, I feel there should be interaction with software for optimization. Most valuable lecture.

 

Iron

I got a real good introduction on code Reuse practices

Iron

mgmt support to invest in automated firmware testing and up-front firmware design

Iron

Different concepts for tying pre-processor directives to as it make sense for the product/code.

Iron

Switching concept, code reuse, compiler features

Iron

For me. the disticntion between product/hardware switches and feature switches.

Iron

Most valuable: Built an outline of suggestions from the course.

Iron

We're now on slide 19.

Blogger

CPP and Switching features

Iron

Wednesday and Thursday's discussion on managing conditional compiles and how to structure them to promote best reusability was most helpful.

Iron

The most valuable part was the code examples of how to setup #defines for reusability.

Iron

Most useful to me: I am not making enough use of CPP

Iron

have been encouraged to continue using compiler directives; and need to learn more about build time switches

Iron

Useful: using conditional compile features.

Iron

Seeing Good example of proper use of switches

 

 

Iron

Most useful - 1) Gary has actually done this and is not talking about how it should be done.  2) Use of Switches.

Iron

Adding the last #else to cause compiler to quit with error if #define is not one of choices.

Iron

The use of the preprocessor directives to break up functionality for testing.

Iron

1 Testing switches

2 Different styles of reuse

Iron

concept of switching on features, not products

Iron

We're now on slide 18.

Blogger

I can't get to the link, is it working for anyone else?

Iron

@lawson and @cavebiker: you can always place tests within your code if you have the extra memory space. Can't cover everything, but could cover a lot of basics, too. (example: passing given inputs to produce expected/known outputs)

Iron

wow, I will definitely take a look at your book. It is exactly what I need. Is there discount for your student? :-)

Iron

I have your book, it provides very valuable information

Iron

We're now on slide 17.

Blogger

We're now on slide 16.

Blogger

@ Lawson -Good luck dude, I am in the same boat as we type

Iron

I am a hardware engineer and I really like to have more feedback from firmware engineers to help me optimize the ASIC, especially regarding register mapping. However, in most of the companies I worked at, hardware and software rarely talk. It is a shame.

 

Iron

@cavebiker Been trying to garner support for automated firmware testing for over a year.  Still not much traction yet...

Iron

Usually the same programmers do multiple generations.

Iron

I would be happy if SW people would owned their code. Blame is usually at someone who doesn't even work here anymore. ??? ingredient for disaster 

Iron

Most of our engineers do both hardware and software.

 

Iron

always nice to own code, but at some point it switches hands. From yesterday: comments, Comments, COMMENTS!

Iron

Very rarely do the same individuals carry forward to the next generation.

Iron

Working at a startup so don't know how the next generation will adapt.

Iron

Slide 15 - This is really easy if you are both ;)

Iron

Never know if you will own the code or not

Iron

Outsource engineers are paid by the hour.  Reusable code cuts their pay.

Iron

For code that we intend to reuse we have the same engineer work on it for multiple generations (At least 4 or 5)

Yes, We have lots of Lifer here.

Iron

We own the product throughout proto phase and will almost for sure own it if issues come up when it is in production.

Iron

One engineer owns the code for several variations in the product family. We have a lot of re-use, and I have even merged multiple versions into one reusable one

 

Iron

Developers and support are two different groups.

Iron

Lucky enough to have long-term engineering here.

Iron

Here, the same engineer owns the code for 3 or more generations.

Iron

Yes. I've learned quite a bit from owning code for a series of related products.

Iron

We're now on slide 15.

Blogger

At least five generations

Iron

I'm the only hardware/software engineer at this time.

Iron

we use the same code for long time in  many products

Iron

Same engineer can own code for multiple generations.

Iron

use lots of contractors (outsource)

Iron

We're now on slide 14.

Blogger

I had to look it up.  Thw #warning directive is supported.

Iron

We're now on slide 13.

Blogger

We're now on slide 12.

Blogger

There have been several good ideas mentioned in posts this week. Is it possible to summarize these on your website or here somehow?

Iron

#warning is supported

Iron

We're now on slide 11.

Blogger

Yes, #warning is supported.

Iron

Keil C51 v 7.20 no #warn or #warning

Iron

Doesn't support #warn

Iron

Yes, our IAR compiler supports #warning.  Would assume GCC would too.

Iron

Our off-the-shelf C compilers, for the newer products support extensive preprocessor directives. Our in-house language compiler, which is C-like, has an unfortunately limited and primitive set of preprocessor directives. For example, it does not support the #error or #warn directives. I have worked around this limitation by putting in code that will not compile into clauses which otherwise should have used a #error

Iron

#warning is supported by CodeWarrior V10

#warn is not supported

Iron

At this point I don't know if my compiler supports #warn or #warning.

Iron

@cavebiker  Agreed.  We've been trying to add a line for Test and Verification to the proto schedule but it usuallyends up being me testing units at my desk for an hour before they go out to customer :S

Iron

never used #war; currently I'm using multiple toolchains but don't know if this direvtive is supported

Iron

Don't know if the compilers I use support #warn. I need to check that!

Iron

never used #warn before

 

Iron

I do not know what my compiler does.

Iron

CodeVisionAVR supports #warning

Iron

I don't know what my compiler does yet with #warn/#warning.

Iron

yes - compiler I'm using now DOES support #warning

Iron

I don't know if #warn is supported; I'll try it soon.

Iron

Warn is supported in my compilers.

Iron

Don't know what my compiler supports.

Don't know what the compiler supports wrt #warn

Iron

I don't know if my compiler supports it or not

Iron

My compiler supports the #warning directive.

Iron

We're now on slide 10.

Blogger

VS2008 supports #warn

 

Iron

how do you cover the interactions among all the features? If you have 20 features, each can be on/off, then you have 2^20 or 1 million combinations, which is essentially "impossible" to verify.

Iron

@Brandon That's pretty much true here.  Sales and upper management bypass the whole design process and pull their schedules out of thin air.

Iron

From one of the courses here I learned (or found through a link) that Embedded code is $15-$40 a line (capital cost all in) -- plus maintenance which is likely $5 to $25 a line per year.

Bad code is expensive --

Re-usable code ithat is clean and works properly and is properly documented is clearly worth a lot of money and is a real time saver.

That is why the interest.

Iron

@Brandon Ow! Feel your pain. First job out of college, we had no marketing dept. Sales had a direct pipe to R&D and the license to promise the customer anything. My boss called us the SMOP department, for Small Matter of Programming -- because that is what the sales guys would tell our customers who wanted custom features or functionality.

Iron

We're now on slide nine.

Blogger

@Brandon I guess we are not along. But I keep pushing automated firmware testing. I hope somday mgmt will listen and spent the effort to di it right.

Iron

@cavebiker & Lawson - You're lucky you have Project Managers.  We don't even get that luxury...our sales guys and the customer drive the schedule, and pretty much ignore our input...

Iron

We're now on slide eight.

Blogger

@Lawson us too, nutty schedules and proj mgrs, ha!

Iron

Developers here are responsible for ensuring that builds cover all necessary conditional cases. Unfortunately, there is no formalized testing of the build process itself.

Iron

We're now on slide seven.

Blogger

@Gary: yes, I develop automated tests that deliberately induce failures and verify that the unit under test (which may be a software build) fails when expected.

Iron

MKS can pass when a build fails

Iron

We're now on slide six.

Blogger

not experience in writing test code

Iron

No formal test methodology.

Iron

in house test methodology, but quite ad hoc. Want to adopt TDD or Agile

 

Iron

@cavebiker Ha! Sounds like us.  Not by choice though, only b/c of nutty project schedules with no time for testing.  :(

Iron

Looking to build our methodology

Iron

No test methodology. Code and hope the customer dosn't see the bug first

Iron

We have borrowed some test methodologies from others but have customized it for our own environment

We're now on slide five.

Blogger

In house leaning toward tdd

 

Iron

In house methodology.

Iron

We have no test code method.

Iron

Also in-house method.

Iron

For release testing, we have a separate software verification group.

Iron

In house test method.

Iron

custom test methods

Iron

In-house methodology.

Iron

We have a seperate software testing group.

Iron

We tend to "evolve" our test procedures concurrently with our design and development.

Iron

Own methodology -- but testing is an integral part. I like slide Four!

 

Iron

We write test before writing the code

 

Iron

No specific test methodology.

Iron

In house methodology.

Iron

we use our in-house testing solution

Iron

Hello from Sunny Brockville.

We're now on slide four.

Blogger

We're now on slide three.

Blogger

We're now on slide two.

Blogger

If you don't have audio, try refreshing your browser.

Blogger

its time and nothing is happening

 

Iron

@Brandon: You might not quite understand some stuff but it is different enough, you could listen live today if you wish.

Iron

@Kentj I concur. Also, proper naming of functions and variables that provides insight into what they do. There's several good books on readable code that have concepts that seem so simple but they so often seem to be skipped or not done in practice.

At one place I worked, a software manager worried that comments made the code easier to steal! Seriously. He believed that. One can only hope that, wherever he is now, he knows better...

Iron

@DaveWR working for a company that provides free coffee then :)

Yes -- we own it. :-( It's our expense!

Gary -- relax man -- I can aussure you that free coffee does not do the trick these days!

Iron

@Kentj - "The job of an engineer is to improve things and improve things until they don't work anymore. :-D"

I've been doing that a lot recently!

Iron

@GStringham: I've been pulled away on critical builds this week (yes, even during the lunch hour...), so I missed parts 2-4.  Would it be worth tuning in live today, or would it be better to just get caught up on the previous lectures?

Iron

@carmacks_reverse:  That's why we should be very liberal with comments.  I just got some code that needs to be reused with no comments at all.

Iron

I'm here to learn new stuff, not get free coffee. Besides nearest Starbucks is a 15 mile drive from my location in WI. Looking forward to part 5.

Iron

Hey all! Today we learn the secret stuff!

Iron

One major road block to code reuse seems to always be poorly documented code (after all -- who wants to reuse a 'module' if it is impossible to discern what it is or how it works?).

Hello everyone from Montreal

 

Iron

Hello everyone from CA

Iron

Hi everyone, from Ottawa ON

Iron

@GStringham: Thanks for reposting.

Iron

@Kdavidson - totally agree with you.

 

Iron

Hey all, from Hayward Wisconsin

Iron

Hello Gary.... oh no forget the free coffee

we are here for the real juice ;)

Iron

Anyone who attends five hours worth of lectures and Q&A just to get a $5 gift card has their priorities messed up. We've had a reuse edict passed down from on high and I'm looking for all the info I can get.

Iron

@KentJ: I posted it on Wed's chat after responding to your email. Here it is again.

Useful links:

Gnu's C Preprocessor Manual: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/

Good description of CPP Gotchas: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/cpreprocessor.html

Iron

@GStringham: I tried posting those two websites you sent me in case any others are having trouble with CPP directives but they don't go through.  Everything else I post does though.

Iron

I do like Espresso Connection and Tully's better though, The coffee tastes better and they have more sugar free flavors.

Iron

@GStringham - Don't be nervous. Your lectures are great.  Like the 47% we just like free stuff.

Iron

Hello from SoCal.

@Pat Mc - Getting back to normal after Sandy? I grew up there, out in Suffolk County.

Iron

@GStringham how about based on how they calculate your grade for this semester I'm currently somewhere in the B range and need to get some more credits to get that to an A :)

I need the coffee to stay awake because I stay awake late trying to debug code that should already work.

Iron

All your discussions about the starbucks card this week is making me nervous. I'm trying to figure out if you are attending only because you want free coffee and you really don't care what I have to say. Or if I am so boring that you need coffee to stay awake during my presentation. :-) Maybe I ought to do more singing or play a laugh track in the background. :-)

Iron

Semi-retired and still love to learn and apply.

Iron

Hello from Huntsville, Al.

Iron

@DaveWR working for a company that provides free coffee then :)

@technologist: I agree, especially this week.

Iron

When you start telling techies that learning is more important than free coffee you are treading on dangerous ground....

Iron

The way I see it if you get a starbucks it's a nice treat but you still are learning something otherwise

Ok, I'm the only one that can log in early because I work out of the home, but I'm sure others have similar circumstances judging how early they log in.

Iron

Some of us can log in early because I work out of the home.  But others (probably most) don't have that luxury.

Iron

I think they should just surprise everyone and give all attendees a gift card like they did before.

Iron

I've seen the coffee question asked numerous times this week and nobody has ever gotten an answer.

Iron

What I do for a free coffee is forget to log out the night before so I'm the first one here in the morning.

Iron

who knows what determines if you "attend"?

You have to send an email to Rob Spiegels secret email account offering to split the card.

Have you ever tried to live on a publishers salry? -- It ain't easy!

 

Iron

Hello from Sunny SE Lake Simcoe --Ontario Canada.

What people will do to get a free coffee...!!!

Iron

Welcome from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Blogger

-The streaming audio player will appear on this web page when the show starts at 2pm eastern today. Note however that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser.

Blogger

-Please join our Digi-Key Continuing Education Center LinkedIn Group at http://linkd.in/yoNGeY

Blogger

-Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.-Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.

Blogger

Good afternoon from Milwaukee.

Iron

Hi from Long Island, NY

Iron

Good afternoon from eastern MA.

Iron

Hi everybody,

I am here.

Iron

Hello again from Rockwell Automation in Cleveland Ohio (actually Mayfield Hts. Lab).

The job of an engineer is to improve things and improve things until they don't work anymore. :-D

Iron

The sound seems to be working better than it did in previous weeks.

I needed to restart the sound a few times on the Monday and Tuesday.

After resetting my browser, the sound has been ok.

Iron

I also liked that the "Blog Talk Radio" started automatically right on time before.  Now I miss at least the first few words having to press the play button.

Iron

Nope, it said "attendees" but I think they determine that by when you log in.

Iron

It is 68F in Hilo HI @ 5:56AM.  Should get to 79 today.

Iron

I think it said to the first 25 to log in.  I liked the old way better too.

Iron

I mean the old way that they determined if you "attended" if you downloaded the slides before class then you would get them, now they limit to the first 25 people, but who knows what determines if you "attend".  Do we have to download the slides, do we have to login, do we have to post?  I have no idea if according to them I am "attending".

Iron

Freezing cold out here in the Northeast

Good Morning from Raining San Jose CA.

It's 60°F now and a High of 63°F.

Happy Friday!!! (TGIF)

Iron

@JHarrison What was the old way, the only way I've seen it was they emailed you an electronic code for it.  Did they physically mail you the cards?

@bitbanger55 it takes like 3 weeks to receive

Iron

i liked their old way of giving sbux cards better

Iron

@bitbanger http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=253209&dfpPParams=aid_253209&dfpLayout=article.  Here's a copy of the rules

@bitbanger if you read the rules you will not get those mailed/emailed to you for at least a couple of weeks until after this session is over

Anyone with the SBUX coffee prize yet ??

Good Morining, definitely one of the better series. Good specifics about "what" to do, "how" to do it, in addition to "why".

Iron

Good morning, Thank you for the continuing education sessions

Iron

Good morning and TGIF also one week before Thanksgiving and a good excuse to stuff your face

Thanks again for having the continuing education classes.

                                      

Iron

Very informative week session

Iron

reusable code - very important for embedded devices.

Iron


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