HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/5  >  >>
NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Diversity
NadineJ   11/12/2012 11:37:27 AM
NO RATINGS
Nice slide show.  I enjoy seeing the variety.  Olga Kalugina did a great job.  I hope to see the prototype highlighted here.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Ann R. Thryft   11/12/2012 11:51:52 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Nadine. Olga's design is now a few years old--I looked for info on deployments or other more recent info about the prototype but haven't found any yet.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
TJ McDermott   11/12/2012 12:04:06 PM
NO RATINGS
This is terrific stuff Ann.  But put yourself in the soldier's position for a moment, trapped under heavy debris, when the Golum Krang robot rolls out of the smoke carrying a big-ass pipe in its hands, with a mechanical voice coming from its grill "I am Golem Krang.  I am here to help you".  Talk about SF movies in real life.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Elizabeth M   11/12/2012 1:08:00 PM
NO RATINGS
That's really funny, TJ! In reading and writing about all these robots and not having seen any of them up close and personally (yet), I have to say it does creep me out sometimes to think of how sophisticated these machines are becoming. While I appreciate the tasks they can accomplish, there is that whole "Terminator" worry lurking in the background. At what point do robots become smarter than us? (Hopefully never, of course, but the artificial intelligence being created today is getting pretty darned smart!)

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
TJ McDermott   11/12/2012 1:20:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth, I'm not at all worried about a Terminator takeover.  It's the base programming that we should worry about.

Modern airliners are fly-by-wire.  Pilots give control inputs which tell the flight computers what the pilot wishes to do.  The flight computers interpret that input and adjust the planes control surfaces, engines, etc. to best meet these wishes.

Flight computers today can override or discard a pilot's inputs if they're outside of acceptable range.  Effectively, a computer engineer designing the control laws has overriden the pilot.  Granted with the best of intentions, but it still means a set of rules set down by someone not in immediate control has more say in what happens than the pilot.

There was a Paris airshow crash back in the 90's I think it was, that can be attributed to the pilot and the flight computer having a difference of opinion.  The aircraft made a low, slow flyby of the show with flaps down, gear down.  The plane kept sinking slowly while the pilot was pulling back (go up!).  The plane thought the pilot wanted to land (flaps down, gear down), and so igored the excessive pull-up input by the pilot.

Something similar happened to one of the YF-22 prototypes (also in the 90s).  The pilot was in a similar situation (low, slow, flaps down, gear down), and decided to abort his landing.  He went through full power into afterburner, and that confused the flight computer.  Flaps down, gear down, but MAX throttle.  Eventually, the plane crashed (after the landing gear retracted, but no injuries) because the plane got into PIO Pilot-Induced-Oscillations.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Elizabeth M   11/12/2012 1:57:44 PM
NO RATINGS
I totally understand, TJ. So if the underlying programming and technology is good, there won't be a problem and in fact, in some cases, robots know best. It's when the code under the covers is faulty that there could be issues with the behavior of these more sophisticated robots. Let's hope that all those working behind the scenes know what they're doing! (Well, of course they do, or we wouldn't have such clever robots.)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Ann R. Thryft   11/12/2012 3:36:56 PM
NO RATINGS
TJ, thanks for the laugh. I totally agree on that name--I would NOT want to hear it while in that guy's position.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Charles Murray   11/12/2012 7:20:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Agreed, TJ. The second image suggests that the idea of a RoboCop (as in the 1987 movie) may not be as far away as we think.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Charles Murray   11/12/2012 7:25:47 PM
NO RATINGS
The Blue River Technology weed puller serves as a reminder that robotic farming is already arriving. Deere was showing off autonomous tractors as far vack as 2008.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Diversity
Ann R. Thryft   11/13/2012 12:15:48 PM
NO RATINGS
That type of problem is what's being addressed in work done by the University of Aberdeen, which we wrote about inHumans, Do You Speak !~+V•&T1F0()? http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=251721 so humans and robots can communicate at a distance about specific tasks the robot is engaged in, and change plans or tactics as necessary.

Page 1/5  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Do you see a perfectly good design and still insist on changing it? You might be an engineer.
A bold, gold, open-air coupe may not be the ticket to automotive nirvana for every consumer, but Lexus’ LF-C2 concept car certainly turned heads at the recent Los Angeles Auto Show. What’s more, it may provide a glimpse of the luxury automaker’s future.
Perhaps you didn't know that there are a variety of classes, both live and archived, offered via the Design News Continuing Education Center (CEC) sponsored by Digi-Key? The best part – they are free!
Engineer comic Don McMillan explains the fun engineers have with team-building exercises. Can you relate?
The complexity of diesel engines means optimizing their performance requires a large amount of experimentation. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a very useful and intuitive tool in this, and cold flow analysis using CFD is an ideal approach to study the flow characteristics without going into the details of chemical reactions occurring during the combustion.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 12 - 16, Programmable Logic - How do they do that?
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service