HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
Bob Salter
User Rank
Iron
Re: needs replacing SOON, anyway -so-
Bob Salter   10/26/2012 4:31:44 PM
NO RATINGS
One thing that I learned with this episode is that the modern computer controlled automobiles are sometimes very difficult to troubleshoot. Sure, one can push some buttons on the Corvette's dash to troubleshoot, which is more than one can do with most newer automobiles, but other maladies can prevent the system from working. Bad ground connections, usually from corrosion, and low battery voltage can often disable the computers. These were checked first. In my case, the two computers, Power Control Module (PCM) and Body Control Module (BCM) seemed to have enough voltage to operate a relay (clicking sound) and flash the dash lights, in sync. However the BCM didn't have the ability to read the resistance of the pellet in the key to satisfy the security system. But, a couple times it did as the engine would crank but not fire. Each GM dealership should have a diagnostic computer called a Tech II for trouble shooting, but this is still no guarrantee of identifying the root cause of the problem. The gentlman that helped myself and others is a GM certified technician, and the way he identified the problem was experience. He recommended that a previous Corvette owner with the same problem replace the ignition switch on a hunch, which solved this owner's problem. He was good enough to send the faulty switch to the technician, who disassembled it, observed the contacts, and figured out how to fix them. My good fortune is that he shared this insight on the forum. This epsisode reinforces my long time theory that experience in auto repair is the best diagnostic tool.

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: needs replacing SOON, anyway -so-
Charles Murray   10/26/2012 4:25:53 PM
NO RATINGS
The potential $1,000 figure quoted in the article is probably not very far off. Having the ability to do the repairs yourself is huge, given the cost of parts on many of today's vehicles. Even more so on the 'Vette, which, according to Consumer Reports, has only an average reliability rating for models between 2006 and 2011.   

richnass
User Rank
Blogger
Re: needs replacing SOON, anyway -so-
richnass   10/26/2012 3:24:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Love your story Bob. I too do a lot of my own car repairs (I own a 33-year-old car). Usually, whatever repair I need to do has been done by someone else who has posted step-by-step instructions, often with a video. This Internet thing is great. I hope it sticks around.

 

Rich

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
needs replacing SOON, anyway -so-
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/26/2012 1:01:44 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree with comments so far – Mechanics often play it safe, and replace parts – not to intentionally run up the bill (as my Wife speculates) – but, because they can't find the real root cause issue; and then they justify it with statements like, "well, that element had a lot of corrosion, and would have need replacing SOON, anyway -so- better safe than sorry".  The much more frugal side of me has often frequented On-line blogs and boards to find better clues.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
throwing parts at it
naperlou   10/26/2012 10:33:47 AM
NO RATINGS
Bob, it is very common for auto mechanics to "throw parts" at a problem.  Actually, I found when I was working on my own cars (typically old British sports cars), I did it myself, since they were not easy to diagnose.  That is why we often collected old cars and parts, so it generally did not cost a lot.  We also did not have the on-line forums. 

<<  <  Page 3/3


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The phablet wars continue. Today we welcome the Nexus 6 -- a joint collaboration between Google and Motorola.
According to a study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, one of the factors in the collapse of the original World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, was the reduction in the yield strength of the steel reinforcement as a result of the high temperatures of the fire and the loss of thermal insulation.
If you have a Gadget Freak project, we have a reader who wants to make it. And not only will you get your 15 minutes of fame on our website and social media channels, you will also receive $500 and be automatically entered into the 2015 Gadget Freak of the Year contest.
Robots are getting more agile and automation systems are becoming more complex. Yet the most impressive development in robotics and automation is increased intelligence. Machines in automation are increasingly able to analyze huge amounts of data. They are often able to see, speak, even imitate patterns of human thinking. Researchers at European Automation call this deep learning.
Thanksgiving is a time for family. A time for togetherness. A time for… tech?
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service