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Re: More bits
Island_Al   10/26/2012 9:48:14 AM
The death of the little 8 bitters was announced several years ago, yet they still appear to be quite live with ever expanding capability.  Guess they never saw their obit, much like Mark Twains quote on the exaggeration of the rumors of his death!  As far as making life easier for engineers and programmers however I will disagree.  The reason is with every expansion of technology comes ever more complex solutions, and with it, ever more headaches to the designer.  Think autonomous cars for example, then the redundancy that must be built into them.  Engineering was never easy and will not be easy in the future.  In the 60s we used two transistors to make one flip flop, thus 36 bit registers took a lot of parts.  Sixty-four k "core" stacks were huge and expensive, but today I whine about having "only" 16GB in my machine.

Will 32 bit machines be replaced by 64 bit?  How about 128 bit guys with far more and faster registers?  What are the practical limits to bus width?  ASCII is still 8 bits wide.

I have been reading a lot on load sharing processor arrays lately.  Sort of like multitasking in hardware.  I'm not quite ready to send my 8 bit stuff to the Smithsonian quite yet.  We always live in an age of discovery and I'm very happy to be alive today.


Jon Titus
User Rank
Re: More bits
Jon Titus   10/25/2012 11:00:08 AM
Hi, naperlou.  Right you are.  And the 32-bit devices have more types of communication peripherals, too--CAN, Ethernet, USB, SPI. I2C, etc., so chip creators have moved even more hardware onto silicon. That effort makes life easier for engineers and programmers.

User Rank
More bits
naperlou   10/25/2012 10:35:54 AM
Jon, in the past this would be handled by an 8-bit MCU and some other circuitry.  The latest crop of 32-bit controllers with built in functionality make the 8-bit controllers obsolete.

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