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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Riding the simulator
Rob Spiegel   10/31/2012 7:10:55 AM
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That would certainly be a hard thing to get used to, Chuck. I used to take my car out of gear while descending mountain passes in Colorado. I would sometimes turn off the engine and just coast. Then one day I got a new car. I tried the same thing. Problem was, the new car had a feature where the steering would lock up when you turned the engine off. I came pretty close to driving off a cliff.

Charles Murray
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Re: Riding the simulator
Charles Murray   10/25/2012 12:13:26 PM
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I don't know the details of how it will work, Rob, but the general idea is that it could shut down, even at speeds of 75 mph, when the driver pulls his or her foot off the gas and coasts. To make it happen, the vehicle has to synchronize the starter motor to the powertrain's spinning ring gear during deceleration. To do that, a very good crankshaft sensor is needed. Suppliers tell us that this feature won't be available in the first generation of start-stop technology. But subsequent generations will have it. By shutting down during coasting, automakers say they can reduce fuel consumption by an additional 10%.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Riding the simulator
Rob Spiegel   10/25/2012 5:23:39 AM
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I can't imagine how that works. I can understand shutting down the power at a light, but at 75 mph, wouldn't the vehicle instantly start to slow down?

Charles Murray
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Re: Riding the simulator
Charles Murray   10/24/2012 6:29:11 PM
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I wish I had, Rob. I'm really curious about this concept of shutting down the engine while gliding at high speeds. Bosch engineers told me earlier this year that they, too, foresee shutting down engines at as much as 75 mph.

VoltDave
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Iron
Charging cables
VoltDave   10/24/2012 10:26:01 AM
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Sorry, this is a little off-topic...

Why are EV charging cables so expensive?   If there are complex electronics involved, why isn't that built into the car, so you could just plug in with a standard 110 or 220 extension cord?  Simple power supplies can auto-sense whether you've plugged into 110 or 220, but a $40,000.00 car can't?  Can anyone offer insight or point me to a link that discusses this?

Thanks.

 

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Interesting technologies on tap
Beth Stackpole   10/24/2012 7:48:53 AM
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With something you love, there's a fine line between work and play. It's a testament to the power of the technology that engineers are having that much fun all the while pushing the boundaries of what's possible and learning the new environments.

Rob Spiegel
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Riding the simulator
Rob Spiegel   10/24/2012 5:59:54 AM
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Nice slide show, Chuck. Did you get a chance to take the simulator for a spin?

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting technologies on tap
Charles Murray   10/23/2012 6:23:26 PM
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I agree, naperlou. The Freescale competition was cool. And the engineers were serious about it. Although the sign said, "Engineers at play," it didn't seem like they were playing.

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting technologies on tap
Charles Murray   10/23/2012 6:09:00 PM
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Beth, I have to admit that I'm not a likely candidate for colorful interior LED lighting, either. Some consumers like it, though. Ford's My Color has been very popular on the Mustang.

 http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=228648

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Interesting technologies on tap
Beth Stackpole   10/23/2012 3:58:21 PM
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Agreed, gsmith120. I see the light now too in terms of some applications where internal LEDs could lend an assist. Although in today's world, most passengers would be using some sort of electronics device--smart phone, tablet, e-Reader--all of which have backlit capabilities hence they don't really need an onboard light for clarity.

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