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Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
Beth Stackpole   10/19/2012 7:26:59 AM
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Fun example and certainly one that could and should be used to encourage interest in STEM among girls. While the math may play out, I like your mom's version that the slippers were magic. Afterall, some fairy tales are better left to just that--fairy tales.

mrdon
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Platinum
Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
mrdon   10/19/2012 9:43:12 AM
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Beth, I agree. Its cool to use engineering to solve old and new problems. Its also important to maintain a creative mindset through imagination foster by fairytales.  Also, the problem illustrates that not only men are good engineers but women as well. This problem should be presented to the Myth Busters to validate the math behind the solution.

tekochip
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Platinum
What kind of glass?
tekochip   10/19/2012 9:53:18 AM
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Maybe it was even quartz?

gsmith120
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Platinum
Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
gsmith120   10/19/2012 5:00:27 PM
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It is a fun example. I guess this kind of example can interest someone or bore them to tears. Personally, I like it.

tekochip
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Platinum
Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
tekochip   10/21/2012 11:00:09 AM
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True, a fun exercise. I remember reading an engineering paper on what sort of damage King Kong really would have caused if be attempted to scale a building and then fall to the street below.

Tim
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Platinum
Flying Carpet
Tim   10/21/2012 9:35:58 PM
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I always wondered if the flying carpet from the Alladin stories was feasible.  This seems like something that could be produced.  Not sure though.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
Beth Stackpole   10/22/2012 7:07:00 AM
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Your point about the King Kong example got me thinking that using these well indoctrinated, childhood stories as a basis to explore engineering concepts and mathematical theories could actually be a solid way to introduce kids, boys and girls, to what's possible in an engineering career. I'm not sure they'd hold ground for those who've moved beyond the introductory stage, but by exposure, they could definitely spark initial interest in the field, especially for kids who might be bored or not fully become engaged with traditional examples.

mr17062009
User Rank
Iron
Alternate explanation
mr17062009   10/22/2012 9:58:23 AM
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'Vair' versus 'verre'.

'Vair' is a leather fabricated from squirrel skin, very fine and thin leather.

'Verre' is glass evidently not easy to wear.

Translation might be the problem.

Critic
User Rank
Gold
Fiction
Critic   10/22/2012 10:42:44 AM
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My concern about glass slippers (since I knew I would never wear them) was that they would be uncomfortable because they are not flexible.  Obviously Cindarella had to be careful how she walked.  I'd like to see the analysis of Cindarella turning into a pumpkin! 

The most puzzling part of the story for me is the "lived happily ever after" part.  Will there be a sequel?

Eddy Current
User Rank
Iron
Spinning Straw Into Gold
Eddy Current   10/22/2012 12:49:06 PM
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The bonus would be erasing the national debt and the elimination of taxes (as long as we keep the secret to ourselves).

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