HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
vkalanov
User Rank
Iron
Re: 3D PRINTING
vkalanov   1/8/2013 11:41:59 AM
NO RATINGS
My company Control Systems Technologies, LLC holds four patents in modular robotic technology.  We basically form a multi degree of freedom configuration (synchronous 6 DOF) around an application and thus shape a work space according to a customer's need.  Our path planning program is based on an API that is directly tied to SolidWorks thus enabling the user to form a 3D path within minutes (including cladding paths) to be executed on an existing part and/or slicing if the part needs to be built.  I think that this technology can be applied readily in 3D printing applications.  Please let me know who I may contact in order to see if there is a fit.

Many thanks,

Dr. Kalanovic, Owner

Vojislav.Kalanovic@sdsmt.edu

www.consytec.org

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D PRINTING
Ann R. Thryft   11/28/2012 11:28:22 AM
NO RATINGS
bobjengr, the number of AM techniques is actually pretty small. Basically, there's SLA, (S)LS, and FDM. Various forms of "3D printing" ("3DP" is a term invented by MIT), are simply doing AM with an inkjet-type nozzle that sprays material in all three directions (X, Y, Z) for creating layers. PolyJet, for instance, is not a separate method, but an SLA technique using inkjet methods. A caveat: the term "3D printing" is now used, confusingly, to refer to all types of additive manufacturing. You also listed Laminated Object Manufacturing, which (obviously) uses lamination. This is a rapid prototyping method that competes with SLA and SLS, but is not considered an AM technique.
One of the best AM resources I've found is here:
http://www.wohlersassociates.com

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
3D PRINTING
bobjengr   11/23/2012 5:23:32 PM
NO RATINGS
Excellent article Ann.  I have followed "additive manufacturing" over the past few years and remain fascinated by the possibilities.   Right now it appears the various types are as follows:

·         (SLA) Stereolithography

·         (SLS) Selective Laser Sintering

·         (FDM) Fused Deposition Modeling

·         (3DP) Three Dimensional Printing

·         (Pjet) Poly-Jet

·         Laminated Object Manufacturing

Stereolithography, of course, was the very first.  There are two things that really amaze me about the processes: 1.)  The size of manufactured product grows each year and 2.) The materials used for the each method expand and grow each year.   I would not be surprised at all is the testing planned yield components that "make the grade" as far as specifications.  I suspect they could exceed expectations.  Again, great post.

  

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Economics
Ann R. Thryft   10/12/2012 12:00:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Greg, I agree, and I thought Dave's comments were also to the point regarding vertical integration in South Africa all the way from raw materials to exported products. Looks like a very wise business move for the country overall.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Economics
Greg M. Jung   10/11/2012 9:08:35 PM
NO RATINGS
I am also impressed with the forward thinking ability of this South African consortium to strategically invest in processes that produce net shape titanium rather than raw titanium, thus capitalizing on much higher profit margins.  This vertical business integration will help both their organizations and their country.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength and Size
Ann R. Thryft   10/11/2012 1:36:00 PM
NO RATINGS
Jim, so glad to give you info about something new that sparks your creative thinking. I think the potential of 3D printing technology can be applied in all kinds of ways we haven't thought about yet. I really enjoy doing that here at Design News. I don't expect everyone to agree or find what I write about interesting. But I'm glad that many enjoy the new and different technologies I find. Creativity has sometimes been defined as bringing together disparate elements in a new way.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength and Size
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/11/2012 1:11:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann- thanks- I did search per your advice, and found this:

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-08/researcher-aims-print-3-d-print-entire-houses-out-concrete-20-hours

,,,which opens a whole new paradigm for me. Very thought provoking and encouraging for new innovative methods for everyday things. (Too bad the associated comments under this linked story are so negative and narrow minded - it helps remind me that even break-thru progress has anchors to drag.)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength and Size
Ann R. Thryft   10/10/2012 12:09:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Jim, the architectural apps are for buildings. If you google "3D printed buildings" you'll find several different versions. Unless you want to make airplanes out of sand and cement, there's no relationship in products. But figuring out to make larger build volumes is, to some extent, a generic 3D printing problem, which is why I mentioned the larger build volumes of the architectural apps.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength and Size
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/9/2012 6:38:18 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, noted;  do you know an example of the architectural Apps -?  I'm fuzzy on that, and wondering if it's a stretch between architectural and aeronautical ,,, ?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength and Size
Ann R. Thryft   10/9/2012 2:05:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Jim, note that those huge build volumes are for building architecture apps, not for aircraft. We don't know the build volume of the Aeroswift machine.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service