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Mydesign
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Software for Nuclear power stations
Mydesign   10/4/2012 6:37:58 AM
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Ann, what's the need of software to dismantle the nuclear power plant. I know the importance of human robot communication, but I think the developments has to be happen in other directions like disaster management and rescue operations.

tekochip
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Re: Software for Nuclear power stations
tekochip   10/4/2012 9:18:11 AM
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Really it's just another chunk of code running a task, just like the operating system, and an environment that's dangerous for humans is the ideal place to deploy the technology.


naperlou
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Re: Software for Nuclear power stations
naperlou   10/4/2012 10:46:56 AM
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Mydesign, I think the intent here regarding nuclear power plants refers to the robots used in dealing with the most radioactive parts.  You might recall that in the Fukushima situation some robots from the US were sent in to check the affected areas so that humans would not have to.  These robots carried cameras and sensors for that task. 

Typically researchers will mention high value situations like this.  If it works, though, the real money is always in high volume.  The real payday on something like this is the cell phone market.

naperlou
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C-3PO
naperlou   10/4/2012 10:54:32 AM
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Ann, you know what this reminds me of?  C-3PO from Star Wars.  That was a robot that communicated between robots and humans.  It spoke millions of languages, including many machine languages. 

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Software for Nuclear power stations
Beth Stackpole   10/4/2012 11:12:31 AM
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I agree with Tekochip; it seems like another way of translating machine algorthims into human-friendly text so data regarding the environment or instructional information can be passed back and forth. There's no spoken component to these systems, is there?? Not to say this isn't valuable or interesting, BTW.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Software for Nuclear power stations
Ann R. Thryft   10/4/2012 12:01:30 PM
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Mydesign, the software is not used to dismantle the power plant. The software is used to help humans and robots communicate ahead of time and during such a delicate operation, to make sure everything goes right. What other kinds of developments did you have in mind?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Software for Nuclear power stations
Ann R. Thryft   10/4/2012 12:03:58 PM
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Beth, this is text to logic symbols and back: no audio. As we mentioned, humans communicate with the robot via a keyboard (at least during the remote operation). Although the sources didn't specify, my guess is the humans see the robot's translated symbols-to-text on a screen. The big deal is being able to communicate in detail to a remote robot at a much more sophisticated level than was possible before. So instead of just being the humans' eyes and perhaps hands--or bomb zappers--like many of the military and rescue robots we've covered, this can let the humans stay at a distance. At Fukushima, all they could do was check and report back. Humans still had to go in to the high-rad area and decommission it. With this, they won't have to.

Charles Murray
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Smart robots
Charles Murray   10/4/2012 8:52:59 PM
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I'm a little surpised to hear that the robot's creators would be anticipating so much difficulty and confusion. The robotic driving systems developed by Google have been nearly flawless, despite the fact they have to deal with unpredictable humans. I recently read that Google cars have had only one accident after logging 250,000 miles, and that happened when a human driver decided to take the wheel.

ttemple
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Re: Smart robots
ttemple   10/5/2012 10:12:15 AM
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Charles,

I don't really get the point of this either.  If I am understanding the article, it sounds like they expect the robot to do things that the observers would have trouble figuring out.  If the algorithms are that complex, it looks like the programmers would implement logging, or some trail of breadcrumbs to discern why the robot is doing what it is doing.

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Smart robots
Ann R. Thryft   10/5/2012 11:54:55 AM
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I've read the same statistic you mention, Chuck, but I'd like to know more about the specific situations. Driving a car mostly consists of understandable, easily repeatable motions. Making decisions about what to do if a truck suddenly turns around in your lane and comes back at you is a very different set of problems and decision-making. I'm giving that example because it's something completely unexpected (something similar happened to me once at 60 mph in the fast lane). In any case, something completely unexpected that the remote human can't see very well--i.e., inside a Fukushima reactor--and that needs to be done right the first time requires complex, highly sophisticated decision-making skills, and very good communication between robot and remote human. The researchers think that the ability to communicate thoroughly before and during complex, dangerous tasks, like two people would, is a good idea.

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