HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
DanSchwartz
User Rank
Iron
It's called Surge Impedance
DanSchwartz   10/12/2012 1:42:11 PM
NO RATINGS
It's called surge impedance, and it's the exact same thing that burned loads & nearly caused fires in another Sherlock Ohms episode:
Noise Messed With the Automation System.
Here is my explanation, copied & pasted verbatim:

It's called surge impedance Zo, which is defined as √(L/C), where L is the inductance in Henrys, and C is the capacitance, which for a coil is the interwinding stray capacitance.

The back EMF V= Zo (δI/δT), and it will have an oscillation frequency 1/(2π√LC). When you open up contacts in an inductive load, δI/δT goes to ∞: You see this as an arc when you unplug an iron; and also when relay & motor starter contacts are switching off an inductive load.

This is also why contactors have serious current deratings when switching off DC: Once the arc is established and current flows through the ionized channel, there is no zero crossing to extinguish the arc, as occurs with AC,

When dealing with AC, you design using the peak (not RMS) value of the load current when calculating, because you don't know where in the AC cycle the contacts will open.

Note: Those of you who are RF jocks will quickly recognize Z(o) = √(L/C) as the equation for the characteristic impedance of a transmission line: Yes, it's the same thing.

Dan Schwartz,
Editor, The Hearing Blog

Irwin@DigiKeyEdu
User Rank
Iron
Chatter vs Fault
Irwin@DigiKeyEdu   10/12/2012 9:41:52 AM
NO RATINGS
I am looking for a low 1-5v chatter method. Does anybody have any ideals. I would like to see the sch/design/specs of circuit. Because I am working on a new oxidizing graphene method similar to this fault. Maybe this is what my mom meant, when she always use to say to me, "I could be a preacher!. See what we can learn from chatter? Please contact me irwin@911ec.com wh circuit design info.

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Upgrade?
Tool_maker   10/8/2012 1:01:50 PM
NO RATINGS
I am frequently confronted with supposed "Upgrades" that solve some sort of immediate problem, but lead to other problems somewhere else. To me this happens most often in assemblies. One of our customers is heavily involved in hood hinges and locking mechanisms in heavy over-the-road haulers. It is not at all unusual to begin to alter tooling to produce a part which will clear something that has been added under the hood only to be stopped before completion because the addition has been removed.

Years ago the company at which I worked sold the same die block to the same customer (3) times. We were producing a part and had to alter the die to produce a new version which did not work (for reasons I do not know), and we went back to the original design. This happened on two more occasions before product launch when they replaced the part altogether. So after paying for the tool and subsequent alterations they ended up with an expensive boat anchor and I had several healthy paychecks from overtime worked. It was a very enlightening experience in the operation of huge corporations where not everyone was on the same page.

SparkyWatt
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Darnn those inductors
SparkyWatt   10/4/2012 6:38:27 PM
NO RATINGS
One of the things this should remind us is that all LC circuits are resonant.  I don't care if the resonance is way out of your operating range, something unintended will stimulate it.  Always make sure they are adequately damped.

If, when they added that inductor, they had also added the right resistor in the right place, the upgrade would have never caused a problem.  Of course, if they had done that task right, the dropout problem in the relay might never have been noticed.

Ah well.

hydrogent
User Rank
Iron
Upgrade that wouldn't
hydrogent   10/4/2012 4:24:47 PM
NO RATINGS
When I arrived at Sunbeam/Aircap, the Chief Engineer proudly showed me the ceramic brusholder they had designed to keep the bakelite holder from seizing on the carbon brush of their motor. By examining some failed parts, I saw the spring collapsed and discolored, plus the solder gone from where the copper braid wire was connected to its metal plate - at the REAR of the brusholder. They brought 120 VAC to the brusholder by a wire attached to a small metal plate that was held against the brush braid wire plate by its spring. Vibration was bad enough to cause chatter between the plates, with heating enough to melt the solder. Once the solder left, the spring tried to carry the current, but its steel turns quickly annealed and relieved the pressure that held the brush against the armature, causing the ring of fire that made the bakelite swell and sieze the brush. About $50 k was spent on tooling alone for that "upgrade". Instead, we added a quick-connect tab intgral to the rear plate and connected power directly, eliminating a part from the BOM, saving money and warranty costs. Mike Harris

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Darnn those inductors
Rob Spiegel   10/2/2012 11:02:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Actually, Jmiller, you're right. The problem eventually resurfaces. 

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Darnn those inductors
jmiller   9/30/2012 5:48:49 PM
NO RATINGS
I understand that a reboot can fix the problem.  But I don't know if that really solves the root cause of the problem.  Somewhere there's something in the code that caused this problem.  And if rebooting means the system will work right now, it doesn't necessarily mean the problem is solved.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Darnn those inductors
notarboca   9/29/2012 4:31:04 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree, lots of "upgrades" are undertaken to solve one specific problem and consideration is not given to the operation of the system as a whole.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Darnn those inductors
Rob Spiegel   9/26/2012 11:36:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Jmiller, it's a matter of blaming the user. However, sometimes a world of problems can be solved by a simple reboot. 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Darnn those inductors
Rob Spiegel   9/26/2012 11:34:08 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting through, Chuck. We've seen a number of Sherlock Ohms pieces where an upgrade had a negative affect on an existing system. "Everything was working fine until they 'fixed' it."

Page 1/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Enabling the Future is designing prosthetic appendages modeled more like superhero arms and hands than your average static artificial limbs. And they’re doing it through a website and grassroots movement inspired by two men’s design and creation in 2012 of a metal prosthetic for a child in South Africa.
In order to keep an enterprise truly safe from hackers, cyber security has to go all the way down to the device level. Icon Labs is making the point that security has to be built into device components.
Senior Technical Editor Chuck Murray gets the skinny on Harting Inc.'s 3D MID technology, which allows users to create a three-dimensional circuit board out of molded plastic.
Three days after NASA's MAVEN probe reached Mars, India's Mangalyaan probe went into orbit around the red planet. India's first interplanetary mission, and the first successful Mars probe launched by an Asian nation, has a total project cost of nearly $600 million less than MAVEN's.
Siemens PLM Software has made an in-kind donation of software to Central Piedmont Community College in North Carolina for its science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) Division.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: October 1 - 30
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service