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studleylee
User Rank
Iron
covert chordic keyboard
studleylee   2/26/2013 3:22:23 PM
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covert chordic keyboard

http://www.dtweed.com/circuitcellar/xcolburn.htm#585

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Hunt & Peck
mrdon   11/6/2012 2:38:39 AM
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Hi in10did(Wayne), The bluetooth version of your keyboard sounds awesome! Have you thought about open sourcing the design to allow makers to explore physical computing projects with it? What's the target cost you plan to sell it for? Being at CES is a good way to drum up consumer interest in the product. I'll be watching the marketing campaign from the sidelines.

in10did
User Rank
Iron
Re: Hunt & Peck
in10did   11/6/2012 1:49:07 AM
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Thanks, I'm glad that you see value in this technology.  I'm currently designing a Bluetooth version of the keyboard that I plan to market early next year.  It is based ob the USB design on the front page of our website www.in10did.com .  I really hope that it will help people who want physical keys for touch-typing on the back of their phones and tablets and may not be able to use virtual keyboards.  We  plan to launch it at CES in January, booth 36178.  If you are coming to Vegas, I hope you stop in and try it!

Reagrds,

Wayne

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Hunt & Peck
mrdon   11/3/2012 11:31:34 PM
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in10did, Very cool keyboard! I definitely see this device/approach being useful for special needs or phyically challenged folks. Any plans to commericalize the prototype?

in10did
User Rank
Iron
Re: Hunt & Peck
in10did   10/11/2012 6:06:19 PM
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Many people hunt & peck because the standard keyboard layout just doesn't make any sense.  If you try to think about it logically, you would never come up with this arrangement.  That was really why I came up with this solution, the alphabet can be produced with ten  fingers using our thumbs to shift the letters.  Ten single presses, eight with one thumb and the last eight with the other thumb.  Press both thumbs for upper-case on the next letter.  It worked out so perfectly that I thought this must be the way typing the alphabet was intended.  So I call it IN10DID to reflect that idea.  Perhaps only people with special needs will be motivated to learn it but I believe it will be useful for many more people.  Thank you all for taking the time to view and comment on my effort here!

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Hunt & Peck
Tool_maker   10/3/2012 8:22:11 AM
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I can see where this device may be of benefit to a special needs user, but only to a special needs user.

I hunt and peck and seldom are the times when my thoughts and fingers are traveling at the same speed. I compose, correct and edit at a pedantic speed so shortcuts are rarely an issue. If I had to memorize another sequence of key strokes to accomplish any writing task, I would not like it. But then I prefer designing in 2-D CAD as opposed to solid modeling, so I am an indangered species and will never be the target audience for any product.

rvguest
User Rank
Iron
Observation in the wild...
rvguest   10/2/2012 5:49:28 PM
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I had a friend in Lincoln, NE, who would do his computing walking down the street, using a small one-eye monitor mounted on spectacles, and a one-hand multi-touch keyboard.  It was interesting to see him walking along "kneading" the "potato" and gazing into the high horizon.

in10did
User Rank
Iron
Re: MOVING KEYBOARD
in10did   10/1/2012 3:24:35 AM
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It is completely understandable that many people who have developed skills touch-typing will not be swayed to learn something new unless to provides significant advantages.  This is disruptive technology and serves best in places where QWERTY in not a good option such as on the steering wheel or a game controller.  Likewise it can improve computer access for folks with special needs.  It might not mean much for some people but could mean the world for others.  For over 100 years, people have been trying to improve upon QWERTY so it isn't an easy thing to do.  That's what makes the effort worth while.

Hear what some people thought about it when we showed it at the Florida state fair.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
MOVING KEYBOARD
bobjengr   9/29/2012 12:59:44 PM
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I think we do get locked into convention but there is no doubt a keyboard applied to some devices; i.e. steering wheel, etc would benefit from the simplification this one would provide.  I, like others who have commented, can see how it would greatly benefit individuals who are disabled.  I learned to type when I was in the 5th grade on a very old "manual" typewriter.  I'm not too sure I could, or would want to adapt to the ten key device demonstrated. 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Voice recognition will leave all this in the dust?
Rob Spiegel   9/21/2012 1:09:03 PM
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Sounds like your system could be adapted for special needs people. Given the wide range of interfaces you suggest in the video, it's quite flexible.

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