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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Ann R. Thryft   9/12/2012 11:52:15 AM
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Rob, I think it's not just your awareness, but a definite explosion, with several trends coming together and interacting, including open source software, cheaper and better electronics (such as cameras and MEMS gyros and other sensors), and the biology angle we're starting to see more of.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Science mimicking Science Fiction
Ann R. Thryft   9/12/2012 11:51:48 AM
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Well said, Jim, about the Frankenstein angle, and good point about the electricity as a "prod" in both instances. Our next robot-plus-biology story will feature light as the stimulant. Stay tuned.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Rob Spiegel   9/11/2012 2:17:37 PM
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Yes, there does seem to be an explosion of robotics going in a surprising variety if directions, Ann. I get the impression that developments in robotics has accelerated tremendously in just the last five or six years. Maybe it just that I'm aware of it lately.

mrdon
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Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
mrdon   9/11/2012 1:13:06 PM
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Hi Ann, Thanks for the survey link: I be sure to review it.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Science mimicking Science Fiction
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/11/2012 1:03:11 PM
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About misnomers, I agree;  my pet-peeve is the  marketing ploy that misguides public thinking down their agenda's pathway:  (Android; Hybrid;  i-anything); --- to the point where an entire generation doesn't understand the meaning, yet they all think You're the idiot who doesn't understand.

But I digress ,,, Reno at Anthrobotic has addressed the Name-Game issue quite well, so I give that topic over to Reno, and read intently the subject-matter jungle of uncharted territory he's entering.

Meanwhile, back to the point.  Combining engineering materials with once-living tissue and literally bringing them to life ,,, well, its literally Dr. Frankenstein, and its happening in real life nearly 2 centuries after Mary Shelley penned the original story in 1817.  Remember it was electricity that brought the being to life. Science mimicking Science Fiction, yet again.  Fascinating, Ann.  Looking forward to additional posts on this topic.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The Naming Game
Ann R. Thryft   9/11/2012 12:15:15 PM
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Regarding definitions, I agree it's complicated. Since the technology is changing, so are the terms and their use and meaning. We've read about androids, implied to be human by their name, for decades in science fiction. But until very recently, the technology wasn't available to combine mechanics, electronics and living tissue. Now it is, and so far it doesn't look human at all: it looks like a jellyfish and some other things we'll be reporting on soon. But the only term we've got is android, so that may have to do for awhile until we come up with a better one that doesn't imply human form. As I commented in another thread, general dictionaries are good for defining broad, commonly used vocabulary terms, but not at all useful for fast-moving, highly specialized fields like science and technology. Wikipedia is usually a lot more reliable. Here's what it says:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robot

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Ann R. Thryft   9/11/2012 12:14:20 PM
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Glad you liked the post, mrdon. A lot of robot R&D is starting to remind me of science fiction movies. The ones that look like people are really big in Japan, but I agree, they're too weird for my taste. DN did a survey on that subject, asking our Systems & Product Design Engineering and Automation & Control Engineering groups on LinkedIn "Should Robots Look Like People or Machines?" Here are the results:
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1381&doc_id=237885

sdoyle
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Re: The Naming Game
sdoyle   9/11/2012 9:50:17 AM
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The biggest use for this that comes to mind for me is moving facial features on an android.  The "muscles" used would have discrete electrical signals going to them controlled by a cpu or fpga of some sort.  When you want the android to smile, particular signals are excited.  When you want the android to smile really big, then those signals are excited with a greater amplitude.  A frown is just different signals.  This is not too far from how our faces actually work.

Obviously there are some hurdles to overcome and refinements to make to get to that point, but the basics of it can be seen in the video.

It wouldn't take much time to create a look-up table for appropriate facial actions (and store that in memory) to make an android have at least basic "emotions".

How many years before your household helping android is able to wink at you when he it cracks a joke?

Reno at Anthrobotic.com
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Iron
The Naming Game
Reno at Anthrobotic.com   9/10/2012 9:29:10 PM
Great coverage, and I hate to be the robot dork raining semantics down on the parade, but... This naming of robots/drones/cyborgs/androids issue is really starting to spiral into unmitigated ambiguity, so with all due respect, mitigation: this is certainly a novel robot, but I'm afraid it's not an android - the greek preference "andro," from which the word is derived, distinctly implies "man," and "oid" is of course... well, "of." Sure, meanings of specific words change over time, but this isn't one of them.

As examples, the terminator is an android. It's also a cyborg. ASIMO is an android, but not a cyborg. Both are robots. Predator and Reaper drones aren't robots, they're supertech R/C planes. So what do we call the starfish and things like it? I suppose we might just need a new standardized word for these non-mechanical artifcial moving things!

It's a complicated issue that a dictionary alone won't solve. I've addressed it a bit here: "WarBot Update: What to Call the Drones Now that They're here at Home – Suggestions?" http://goo.gl/Dxhh3

Thanks - Reno at Anthrobotic.com

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
mrdon   9/10/2012 2:26:26 PM
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Hi Ann,

I agree about being creepy and fascinating at the same time. It seem's like a mad scientist movie where life is being created in a lab. I like robots with a mechanized appeal but when they start looking and acting like humans that's where I draw the line. Fascinating article.

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