HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2014 11:42:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Deberah--it's good to know people are reading our older posts.



Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2014 11:41:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Jack, autonomous swarming behavior is very different from multiple UAVs controlled by multiple people; the swarming bots are often capable of making their own decisions about how to carry out a mission among themselves. Check out the links we give for more info. This is a different world.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Like bees?
Debera Harward   6/13/2014 3:49:47 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Ann, for such an interesting post , no doubt these days autonomous UAVs swarming have become very popular . With every technology we have pros and cons associated with it but what I think is because of the government regulations these UAVS cant be that harmfull on the contrary these swarming UAVS can be a great help for the defense and millitary system.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Cabe Atwell   6/11/2014 12:38:12 AM
NO RATINGS
I wouldn't worry so much about 'swarms' of autonomous drones making strafing runs on targets so much, as there seems to be a lot of them falling out of the skies lately. They should probably perfect their flying skills first.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Like bees?
Jack Rupert, PE   9/17/2012 4:01:52 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm not sure I see the concern about swarming with these bigger units.  (The micro robots in "Prey" are a different story).  How is that much different than having individually controlled UAV's with auto-pilot turned on?  Instead of a group of people trying to synchronize their movements to achieve a co-ordinated effort it can now be done by a single operator.  Actually, any cooridinated air attach could be considered a swarm, its just the number of people that need to be involved (and therefore the number of chances for operator error).

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Ann R. Thryft   9/17/2012 3:29:13 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, now I get you TJ. I wasn't thinking of a possible hostile use of swarming bots, but that's a really good point. Let's hope no one writes popular fiction about it.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
TJ McDermott   9/17/2012 12:26:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I'm not worried so much about them going out of control.  I'm much more concerned about them being used in an aggressive manner.

One does not even have to board an aircraft anymore to use it for offense, if a swarm of UAVs can do the job.

While it smacks of science fiction, so did Tom Clancy's "Debt of Honor".  Seven years after its publication, we saw fiction can become horrific reality.

I'm not automatically against this technology, but I think it can be TOO easily misused.  One can say that of any technology, but this one is very easily subverted.

Japan, during WWII, launched an incendiary attack on the continental USA using balloons that drifted across the Pacific.  It was completely ineffective.

Last decade, a man used a bunch of balloons to soar in just a lawn chair.  This is the proper use of simple lighter-than-air technology.

I see the same thing happening with swarms of UAVs, but hopefully we'll see a crazy man in a lawn chair hoisted aloft with his UAV swarm and never see the other sort of use.

 

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Ann R. Thryft   9/17/2012 12:13:26 PM
NO RATINGS
TJ, sounds like you don't relish seeing lots of these in the skies. Your comment make me think of the swarming robots in Michael Crichton's novel Prey, although those were, of course, much smaller nanobots. But the question is similar: what happens if they get out of control? Do we all watch/read too much sci-fi? I'm never sure...

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Like bees?
Ann R. Thryft   9/17/2012 12:12:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting app, Thinking_J. I'm familiar with the general problem you mention, but in much denser areas than 2 people per sq mi. Search and rescue is one of the apps I've seen mentioned for autonomous swarming UAVs and flying robots. I don't see why it couldn't be applied to wider areas.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Autonomous robot swarms?
William K.   9/16/2012 4:47:29 AM
NO RATINGS
UAV swarms would certainly offer a great deal of potential for search and rescue operations, that does seem like a very good application indeed. But then the next stage of evolution, in warfare, would be just like the airplane: first, for observation, and next as an additional weapon. A swarm of armed drones would be quite an effective way to support ground troops, but it would have the terrible risk of being tricked by the enemy. GPS "spoofing", and other methoids of misleading, have all ready been found and demonstrated to work. So there are quite a few potential serious hazards associated with such a swarm technology, since the swarm must communicate to function. The inter-element communications links are the weakest points in swarm technology, and should not be ignored. That is the place where defense against a swarm could be made.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service