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Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Too slow for US markets?
Tool_maker   9/20/2012 1:06:28 PM
NO RATINGS
  I did notice the only other vehicles in this video are bicycles. That is the only thing I would share a road with in one of these things. It is a toy, pure and simple and to those people who think safety is no issue, check with your insurance carrier. This thing looks like a cute little coffin on wheels and I would not be caught dead in one, for fear that I would become dead in one.

  To those who compared this to a motorcycle I could not disagree more. When I rode I always felt one of the things  that helped keep me safe was the ability to see 360 degrees and the natural alertness that come with being exposed. I also had the ability to accelerate instantly if the need arose. I see none of those features in this vehicle.

  Lastly, I wonder what would occur if this thing got pinned between two vehicles in a collision. Is safety my only concern? Of course not, but it has to be a deal breaker for all but the careless single rich guy without responsibility.

agriego
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too slow for US markets?
agriego   9/17/2012 3:37:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I suppose you could drive it around a country club or retirement village. With a top speed of 31 mph, it's just about useless for driving it around a city.

Just my $.02

skywirelynx
User Rank
Iron
Too slow for US markets?
skywirelynx   9/12/2012 1:42:13 PM
NO RATINGS
This car looks cool, and would be fun to drive I think. However, as currently configured, I think it is too slow for even urban use in the US. According to the specifications listed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiriko#Specifications) in the Hiriko page of Wikipedia, it's limited to a top speed of 31 mph (50 kph). In the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex there are many streets within the urban commute that have 35 or 40 mph speed limits and traffic travels at least that fast except during rush hour (or when a police vehicle is pacing the "pack" - yeah, you know what I mean). I honestly don't know where one could practically use this car in the US. 

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
FOLDING CAR
bobjengr   9/4/2012 6:05:36 PM
NO RATINGS
I will say one thing-- This is thinking outside the box.  I generally hate that phrase but I certainly feel it applies here.  No way would I take this car on the Interstate.  I do believe it might be OK for around town, provided defensive driving was practiced.  Can anyone tell me if it has air bags?  I suspect seat belts yes--air bags no?????  I would imagine great difficulty in trying to get this vehicle approved for sale in the US.

 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
And now here's something I hope you'll really like:
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/4/2012 1:05:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Rocky! Lots of really good banter on both sides of the Safety/Crash-worth discussion. But to a completely different issue, that of getting into and out of tight parking spaces,  this car not only FOLDS, but all 4 wheels turn sharply, as it literally spins out of the parking space. Very unique, and impressive.

For a fun look at 60 year old technology that did something similar – check out this Cadillac video ---  Just for fun.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLSX1zbR2zI

embeddeddesigner
User Rank
Iron
Folding Car Is the Ultimate City Vehicle
embeddeddesigner   9/1/2012 9:34:02 AM
NO RATINGS
The front-opening car made by BMW during the reconstruction era WAS the Isetta:

- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isetta

I remember seeing them in the US in my childhood.

From what I have read, the driver was extremely vulnerable to head-on collisions. Most fatalities occured because the driver bled to death before he could be extricated from the car (This was before the jaws of lilfe).

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
A folding car?
William K.   8/31/2012 10:18:37 PM
NO RATINGS
This is an interesting vehicle, and it could solve a few problems both in parking and on crowded roads. In fact, the reduction in roadway crowding could be the more useful benefit. But it probably can't be sold here in anything like it's present form, because of safety issues. That is not to be critical, but I see it as a sda fact. I have seen quite a few drivers who should be restricted to small cars that don't offer much protection, because it might help them focus on driving more carefully. Lack of armor does make some people more attentive.  So the little car might even makeour roads safer

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nice, but...
gsmith120   8/31/2012 2:51:00 PM
NO RATINGS
It is a cute car but wouldn't buy or ride in one.  Can't remember the exact name but BMW had a little car like that one, where you got in/out thru the front of the car.  Saw one in Ann Arbor MI last year can't find pic otherwise would share it. Also, one appeared on in a storage locker on Storage Wars.

N. Christopher Perry
User Rank
Gold
What would Jeremy say?
N. Christopher Perry   8/31/2012 2:50:53 PM
NO RATINGS
I'd love to see how the guys on Top Gear UK react to this thing?

 

I'm somewhat ambivalent.  I've managed to set up my life so I can walk to work, so this car isn't terribly compelling in my case.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Nice, but...
notarboca   8/31/2012 1:44:53 AM
NO RATINGS
I like the design; it seems "cool" and functional.  The safety concerns over front end collisions do dampen my enthusiam.

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