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motorman
User Rank
Iron
Wheel motor
motorman   8/24/2012 2:17:38 PM
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I doubt very much that one can build, with todays magnet and material technology, an 87 HP wheel motor, maybe 20 HP but I think that's it for now.

tkhorton
User Rank
Silver
Tesla?
tkhorton   8/24/2012 1:26:06 PM
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Maybe Tesla's CEO knew a little something about this development when he made that prediction (http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1366&doc_id=246722)

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Novel design approach
Rob Spiegel   8/24/2012 12:48:35 PM
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That makes sense, Ann. I would guess these new developments will come in handy as the car makers work to meet higher MPG standards.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Plastic body
Ann R. Thryft   8/24/2012 12:26:09 PM
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Chuck, that's a really good point about EVs. One of the reasons carbon composites are becoming popular in aircraft is their non-conductivity, which is useful for planes flying through electrical storms, for example. That does seem like an obvious benefit for EVs. Regarding what happens to the motors when they are impacted, good question. The company's description: http://www.sim-drive.com/english/technology/index.html#Shimizu_In_wheel_Motor-Drive sounds like the frame may have been made extra-rugged to accommodate this.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Novel design approach
Ann R. Thryft   8/24/2012 12:25:09 PM
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Rob, I think you're right. Several automakers are introducing newer technologies, such as plastics and recycled materials, into their EV lines first. That appears to be partly to test out these technologies on lower-volume product runs to get the kinks out before committing to mass manufacturing, but also to help with the weight problem caused by batteries.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Motor for more mileage
Rob Spiegel   8/24/2012 12:24:38 PM
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That makes sense. It looks like the wheel hub motor has a proud history: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel_hub_motor

It was used in a race car developed by Ferdinand Porsche in 1897.

pkoning
User Rank
Silver
Re: Motor for more mileage
pkoning   8/24/2012 11:44:31 AM
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I don't remember where I read it -- might have been Design News, or Aviation Week, but some years ago someone built a motor in nosewheel system to let airliners push back from the gate without needing a tug.  As I recall, part of the puzzle there was to get enough torque and low enough RPM with reasonable drive electronics, and the answer to that involved having an unusually large number of poles.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Motor for more mileage
Rob Spiegel   8/24/2012 10:53:28 AM
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Pkoning, when was motor in the wheel tried before? Apparently it must not have been very successful.

nearboston
User Rank
Iron
Re: Controls and Unsprung Weight
nearboston   8/24/2012 10:50:23 AM
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It seems like it would be great in town or for low speed commuting, but highway speeds would require overcoming some large gyroscopic effects.  I'd like to see some specs on the steering control system. 

 

I think that was the main problem in the original design of 100 years ago wasn't it?

alzie
User Rank
Silver
260KW?
alzie   8/24/2012 10:33:49 AM
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Thats like 350HP.

Thats little things gotta hawl ass!!!

Or, they were off by a decimal point.

35HP i could believe for a commuter car.

Very cute, way to go!

 

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