HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
You must login to participate in this chat. Please login.

Thank you for the great introduction to ARM Coretex-M0

Iron

Thanks, Paul.  The week was an great intro to Cortex M0.

Iron

Good class.  Sounds like Orchid Tech has had some interesting application design wins giving you good experience Paul.  Reviewing the archived version of this class there appears to be more information and development kit / support information available now.

Thank you Paul, great lecture

Hi again, looking forward to explore more about M0-M4

I missed it but its a very good lesson.. Thankss

Iron

Have played with some Freescale but not with this core.

Iron

I consider to use it because is powerfull and has nice power saving modes

Iron

@Chuck - yes, made similar "sandwich" measurements

Iron

@Chuck - so far, no plans for Cortex-M0+

Iron

@Chuck - played with STM

Iron

Great to have access to recorded sessions.

Iron

Missed the live lecture due to travel.

Iron

Thanks Paul. Great series!

 

Iron

Yes I have made those type of measurements

I have not worked with any of these commercial devices

Picking up the last one for the week

Go Cortex

Thanks Paul; very interesting lecture

Iron

I have worked with the NXP LPC1768.

Iron

Indeed great lecturer, a very good athmosphere, sadly I couldn't get on time tonight (23:35 here in Sofia now)!

Iron

Thank you Paul, great lecteur.

Iron

I have made measurements like these in my projects.

Iron

I would think about it because of its low power operation. I would also discuss more about it later.

Iron

It seems that the M0 compares favorably with 8- and 16-bit MCUs in terms of power, features and cost. What are the pros and cons of using the M0 for most designs? Are there any reasons to keep using the 8- and 16-bit MCUs?

Iron

I am using Eclips/GCC for Stellaris, Android and the Make controller.

Iron

@przemek  GCC supports AVR. AVR Freaks even has a forum on it. I don't think they support PIC.  I agree that using a single tool chain is  *huge* benefit.  This is especially true if you use STM for one project and NXP in the next.  Perhaps things with GCC have improved since the last time I tried to use it. I know that some commercial tool chains are based on it and Eclipse. I will take your advice and take another look at it. Thanks!

Iron

I liked developing the application code in a PC environment (unmanaged C on .NET/Windows or Linux and associated development IDE) and then cross compiling to the taget with GCC.

ahem, gcc does not support 8-bit architectures... there were other development tools (SDCC, TinyCC), perhaps you're talking about those.

Nowadays GCC is a competitive toolchain---some vendors just ship it as a default option. The biggest advantage is that if you can live with it, it's the same toolchain regardless of the model you're using, within the ARM line and even when porting to something else. I am talking about the tricky stuff like linker scripts, interrupt code, ASM() low level code, runtime libraries, etc.

 

Gold

Paul:  For now I will stick with Stellaris and CCSV5 because of the code size issues -- wish it wasn't so -- but that's life -- can't justify IAR cost.

Iron

OK, Paul signing off now.  Thanks for attending.

 

Blogger

Yes, I strongly agree that 32K is plenty.  If you write your own

libraries and are careful about what you link into your application,

it is possible to get a whole lot done in 32K of executable code.

Many of our re-world applications are not much larger than that.

 

Now pull in a commercial USB stack library, an SD Card driver and

flash file system... perhaps a commercial RTOS and you're up to

100K in no time.

 

Blogger

32K is plenty for many projects, and IAR is generous in providing that much on their free version.  From time to time I do side consulting or whatever, and can't justify the cost of the commercial ARM products.  My previous experience with the GNU 8 bit stuff is that it takes a lot of time to get it all running. I'm willing to pay sometihng to avoid that and have commerical PIC and AVR dev systems.  At some point it the cost of the development system might make some designs impractical. 

Iron

Don't forget ST Micro Discovery dev board which goes for $9.90

Gold

Multi Core Cortex would be interesting!

Iron

Multi-core presentation... Yes that would

be fascinating!!

Blogger

AT Chuck -- maybe a session on Control Systems security -- like last magazine

Iron

Have a great day all y'all (I found out that Y'all is singular and all y'all is plural from Jr Olympics kick-off in Houston this year.)

Iron

Take care all - see you in a couple of weeks.

Pauln - wehn are you up for a multi core presentation (Please)

Yes -- more CORTEX please!

Iron

Joe: My ice cream was great -- go get yours.

Iron

It seems like the questions are through?  I hope you all

enjoyed this track, I hope to get to speak with you again

on another presentation.

Blogger

OK - I sit corrected - I was remembering from the NXP rep when they first came out.

Thanks Dave. LPC1114 Expresso sure in my list

Iron

Take care everyone!   :)

Try $32 USD for the LPC1114

Iron

If i remember correctly the LPC1114 Expresso boards are ~$50 USD

I just stick with Windows and Eclipse -- coward I guess.  Have several Linux systems but...

Iron

@chuck & @paul,  Thanks for the great series

Iron

This should also answer the Questions about GNU and M0:

http://www.freertos.org/FreeRTOS-for-Cortex-M0-LPC1114-LPCXpresso.html

 

Iron

Wow, arm Linux has a lot of support

Blogger

32k is great. Gary

Iron

arm-linux-gnu-gcc: note: valid arguments to '-mcpu=' are: arm1020e arm1020t arm1022e arm1026ej-s arm10e arm10tdmi arm1136j-s arm1136jf-s arm1156t2-s arm1156t2f-s arm1176jz-s arm1176jzf-s arm2 arm250 arm3 arm6 arm60 arm600 arm610 arm620 arm7 arm70 arm700 arm700i arm710 arm7100 arm710c arm710t arm720 arm720t arm740t arm7500 arm7500fe arm7d arm7di arm7dm arm7dmi arm7m arm7tdmi arm7tdmi-s arm8 arm810 arm9 arm920 arm920t arm922t arm926ej-s arm940t arm946e-s arm966e-s arm968e-s arm9e arm9tdmi cortex-a15 cortex-a5 cortex-a7 cortex-a8 cortex-a9 cortex-m0 cortex-m1 cortex-m3 cortex-m4 cortex-r4 cortex-r4f cortex-r5 ep9312 fa526 fa606te fa626 fa626te fa726te fmp626 generic-armv7-a iwmmxt iwmmxt2 mpcore mpcorenovfp native strongarm strongarm110 strongarm1100 strongarm1110 xscale

Gold

You made your point :)

I believe GCC from version 4.5.0 support M0.

Iron

Wow!  That whole thing came up bold.

Iron

GNU - I don't know, probably yes.

Blogger

Just look at GCC compiler and toolchain.

Gold

The Rowley is about $1K.  IAR is nice but starter is limited to 32K.

Iron

Pauln - do you know if the GNU/GCC supports the M0 yet? I thought it might

Fundamentals of Embedded Computer Vision: Creating Machines That See in two weeks

Iron

Take a look at the Rowley compiler.  I think its one

of the lower cost ones.  Also, I think IAR has a free starter

kit.

 

Blogger

@gschmick - machine vision is next in about 2 weeks (Sept 10th)

Thanks for great week Paul. Most of my designs have been 8-bit. Cortex M0 seems like  a great price/performance alternative to high end 8 bitters. I just wish I could find a reasonable compiler under ~$500 like those available for the 8 bit world.

Iron

There are a lot of M0 demo boards.  NXP, Nuvoton,

and ST Micro have them now.

Blogger

I think I see a pattern here... whenever I copy from the live chat into the Your Post window, several of my earlier posts are repeated. Has anyone else noticed this?

Iron

Time to go earn my keep. Thanks Paul and Chuck. See all next session.

Iron

Note:  the ISD15100 is a link to digikey.

 

Iron

Thanks Paul. Simple lecturer and yet rich. Thanks Chuck. As usual great pick.

Iron

@Chuck - When and what is the next series?

Iron

@Rlewicki: I know what you meant, but "full person's pulse" just painted a picture in my mind of a system that only worked after a meal and could not measure a hungry person's pulse. I guess it must be Friday....

Iron

Thank you Mr. E!!   :)

ISD15100 Any thoughts about this part as a 'get started' demo board?  ( BOARD DEMO FOR ISD15100 ).  Do I just get this, the programmer, and ? Which compiler for C ?  and away I go?

Iron

Paul,

Thanks for the nice review of the Cortex M-series. I'll have to look around for an eval board to play with. Thanks also to Digi-Key for sponsoring this-

Iron

@pauln: You did a great job this week. Thanks so much for your upbeat, clear presentations!

Iron

@Chuck: not considering Cortex-M0 for any upcoming designs.

Iron

@Joe: Your posts are far from useless. Your enthusiasm is contagious!

Iron

@pauln: Thanks for clearing that up.

Iron

Thank you Paul and Chuck and everyone who makes these classes possible.

Iron

Excellent week - I've been working with an M0 for 8 months and still learned stuff.

No last slides are not hyperlinked, just go to

arm.com, you'll see all the cool stuff they have there!!!

Blogger

Many times, this is an old but good trick.  I used it in a medical application where I needed to calculate FFT within the timespan of a full person's pulse.

Iron

Excellent week, thanks Paul, Chuck, and especially Digi-Key & Design News for sponsoring this series

Iron

Thanks Paul for the great presentation on arm cortex m0. I learned quite a bit this week and now know enough to go get more for myself.

Iron

Thanks, Paul and Chuck.

Iron

thanks to Chuck and DigiKey

Iron

Thanks Paul and Chuck.

(when should we be looking for our pointer? :)

Ohhh yes, you are right, the scale is not linear

That's what you get for using Excel and not doing

the work by hand yourself.  I am sure it will look

different, thank you very much for pointing that out!!!!!

Blogger

Thanks, Paul and Chuck!

Iron

Thank you Paul for a week of informative presentation.

Iron

Thank you Paul and Chuck.

Iron

thank you paul - a great week of presentations - look forward to more in the future

Iron

Thanks Paul, Chuck and everyone

Iron

Thanks Digikey, Chuck and Paul!

Iron

Thanks Paul and Chuck.  Worthwhile!

Iron

Thank you for the series!

@Mr.E & pauln - try graphing it on a log scale to see how it might be different.

Thanks for a great week Paul!

Iron

thanks!  great presentation

Iron

Thank you so much...

 

Iron

Thank you Paul and Chuck.

Iron

yes please. I enjoyed. Thank you :)

Iron

THanks for the presentations!

Thanks to Paul, Chuck and Design News for making all of this possible.

 

Iron

@pauln: You did a great job this week. Thanks so much for your upbeat, clear presentations!

Iron

Very excellent week!   Thank you everyone!!!

Thanks Paul and Chuck

Iron

Thanks for a great series, Paul!

Iron

Thanks Paul & Chuck. A great presentation!

Iron

Are the links in the last slide, suppposed to be a hyperlink?

Iron

Thx very much Paul, Chuck.

Iron

Paul,

Thanks.  This was definitely the best presentation of the week for my needs.

Iron

@pauln: On slide 20, you may be creating the apparent inflection point by the non-linear scale on the Megahertz (x) axis. It looks like the microseconds is decreasing proportionately to the increase in MHz all the way to at least 24 MHz after which there just isn't enough resolution to visually detect the y value.

Iron

Paul - you may also try the slide 20 test on different vendors FLASH implementation - They do different games with FLASH accelleration and this may be illuminating.

When looking at the ARCTAN example, you are measuring just the code crunching time.

With ADC inputs, you need to add in time for that conversion.

Iron

is that a real code example? it adds a fixed amount to the argument on each loop---presumably the loop is 'timed' by a hardware movement sensor. It's just a table lookup; at your resolution (0.01), it looks like  you'd have 2 pi 1/0.01 or just over 6000 distinct possible values.

Gold

why not linear?  is there fixed overhead?

Iron

Just once, data was 'corrupt' and scope showed getting cut off due to timing

 

Iron

All the time. Always leave some debug pins to measure execution time, events, etc.

 

Iron

I quite frequently do things like slide 18, not just to see how fast a function runs, but how often it runs.

Iron

Yes, I use to check that my code is running faster than my time interrupts.  It is useful to compare compilers & micros for the timing.

Iron

no, but interesting point of view thing. I will consider this in futur.

have used pulse to output pin for code timimg. works well.

Iron

Yes, a lot like that with toggle pin(s) and a scope

Iron

Yes, I've made measurments like that many times

I did in optimal control systems design.

Iron

@danlafleur - Haven't worked with this chip. I was doing lab grade calibrated measurements as part of a larger instrument.

@Chuck - yes

@chuck - yes have taken measurements like this

Iron

For millisecond intervals, yes, but not us intervals

Iron

Chuck,

Yes I have made many scope measurements.

Iron

Yes, I have done this tracing many times.

Iron

of course, my bread and butter

Iron

always, and always too slow for end user, so they say

 

Iron

Yes -- use the oscilloscope for just that.

Iron

yes of course (other micros)

Iron

@Chuck: make measurements like this all the time.

Iron

Yes  - to ascertain power consumption.

Iron

Page reload brings back audio

Iron

You can get archived versions of flash from here: http://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player/kb/archived-flash-player-versions.html. Downgraded mine to 1.2.202.235 to get the audio working.

Iron

@LevitonDave, just like the parallax propeller chip, uses log/antilog and sin tables for internal math

Iron

@ckapsalis  I had to change computers because after downloading Adobe Flash several times, it still couldn't be found.

Iron

Paul - use Log/exp to convert voltage to power and back. This is also a good compute power test.

auido is good here

Iron

Ugh - no audio. Adobe updated flash player today - I guess its not compatible.  I'll have to listen to the archive of the stream. Thanks to everyone who took the time to answer my questions. :)

Iron

Yes, I'm limited to 0.5mm pitch

Iron

Small packages can get hard to manufacture PC boards with them. Make sure your manufacuring can support them.

Nuvoton M051 Eight PWM interesting feature

Iron

ST -- multiple I2C, multiple UART 12 bit ADC -- impressive!

Iron

try reloading to get audio

@ckapsalis:  Click F5 and go to slide 10

Iron

Audio's been up for 15 minutes

Iron

Audio is fine here in Canada.

Iron

@LevitonDave @DaveWR- thx for the info!

BTW - does anyone have audio yet?

Iron

have not used m0, but will probably evaluate soon.

Iron

@LevitonDave The CCS V5 is an Eclipse chain -- just neatly integrated with all the TI tools. Skip the configuration steps -- stick with CCSV5.

I have configured Eclipse and Yagrto with ARM -- so I have been thre compiling FreeRTOS. KISS!

Iron

@LevitonDave - Thx. I assume that is what TI's CCSV5 is built upon. With respect to IAR due you find this to be a stable platform to work with, including debuggers / emulators?

Iron

@ckapselis - Eclipse (once configured) is a reasonable tool chain. I'm currently using IAR for commercial development.

No yet - M0 is sufficient for small devices and M3/4 more appropriate for larger systems.

The low power modes are very attractive.

Iron

@DaveWR - Yeah its big bucks for IAR. OK. Will check out TI's CCSV5. Thx.

Iron

I am vendor specific picking a Cortex or other micro.  Choosing certain vendors could have me shot (justifiable homicide) by my colleagues in Purchasing and Logisitics.  Something to do with not meeting commitments to support production ...

Iron

In the lprocess of selecting the best match for a smart grid application - home demand rate 

Iron

@Paul - what are the prices for these various boards/systems

Iron

Main reason is claimed lowest power consumption for given processing load

Iron

Exploring it for a potential project for peripheral data collection

Yes, low cost, pleanty RAM and pleanty ROM for a low power

Chuck,

I have not yet considered nor have I discounted the use of the MO+.

Iron

not at this time yet

Iron

no immediate applications for arm cortex, just putting knowledge away for use later.

Iron

M0 at this point appears to be too slow.  I'm using an 80MHz embedded controller.

Iron

Would like to, but just need a project demanding a 32 bit project. Good opportunity to brush up on ARM

Iron

No, not designing with MCUs for the moment.

Iron

Using the M0+ or planning? -- maybe -- thinking about it.

Iron
You are just a "stone through away from us across the lake.
Iron

Thinking about cortex M0 Freescale for low Power application.

Iron

@Chuck: not considering Cortex-M0 for any upcoming designs.

Iron

@Chuck - yes have been thinking about eval cortex

Iron

Not yet considering M0+

Iron

@ckapsalis: Just about missed your question. I like IAR -- but can't afford the full version. I suffered at first with TI's CCSV5 -- but am quite happy now. It is integreated with SysBIOS which I will use on a bigger project -- like with L3MS6965 or the LM4F232. So since it is fully functional when hooked to a TI board -- and FREE in that circumstnce -- I recommend it.

The Stellarisware 9107 and the examples are quite useful.

Iron

would like to use a cortex core, but haven't got a new project ready yet

 

Iron

@Paul = what is the price of these Kinetis boards/systems

Iron

@rhall007 - Hi from a transplanted Waukesha kid

Chuck,

I have not yet used any of these.

 

Iron

Hello from Milwaukee

Iron

I have an Altera Student Demonstration board, DE2, with Cyclone II. Is this an ARM Cortex M1?

Iron

Not until four projects from now.  Projects 2 and 3 don't even use processors!

Iron

@DaveWR - which dev toolchain worked best?

Iron

Just played around a bit with ST Micro eval kit. Like others mentioned before I need a small project to have  a reason to really dig in.

 

Iron

I've built and run the demo projects on some of the ST and NXP M0 parts

waiting for Altera...

Iron

yes cortex m3 from STMicroelectronics

Iron

Hello from Germany, I didn't use any M0 right now

Iron

Have worked with the NXP LCP11C24

 

Iron

Nope. Not those ones -- just TI and Atmel.

Iron

Yup NXP, ST, Freescale as well as TI.

Iron

audio loud and clear

Iron

like the blue color in the box

 

@chuck - have not worked with these commercial ARM devices

Iron

no experience with arm cortex

Iron

Have not worked with ARM.

Iron

Not yet. Hope to soon.

Platinum

No, I haven't worked with any of them yet

Iron

Good afternoon Paul.

Iron

Hi, from Ottawa, ON

Iron

do we have audio yert?

 

Hi Chuck, Paul, and all.

Iron

Hi from Jersey, the land of SUV's

Iron

Hi all from Wilmington NC

Iron

hello all, from Richmond, British Columbia

Iron

Hi from Portlandia (the land of Grimm and Leverage :)

show starts at 2pm sharp.

Iron

Metal can op amps were used extensively in precision test equipment.

Iron

Hello from Minneapolis.

Iron

@Phil. See you on the TI e2e forum -- anxious to hear your success story.

Iron

Hello all. From Sunnyvale, California

 

Hi, when does the show start

Iron

Hello from Santta Cruz, CA. Does this program just "start"?

Good afternoon folks.

Iron

@Kentj  - Came across an interesting point yesterday - they said the temperature effects on the amp are less with the metal can, since the plastic (DIP) was in contact with the die and not so for the metal can version.

Iron

good to be aboard again... Rod.R.

9:58 A.M. North Pole, AK (Alaska)

Iron

San Diego's in the house - Ola.

Hello from Sweden.

Iron

@DaveWR: I will try them.

Iron

hello from MI for the last day.

Iron

You can also imprint the metal can on your finger! :-)

Iron

You can leave your finger print in the metal of metal can op amps if they're misclocked, I discovered.

Iron

Free RTOS really is free but the manuals (if you get both of them cost $50

Iron

Hello from Orange Co. Ca.

Iron

@Kentj: I assure that metal can op amps are alive and well and hot as ever as video speeds.

Iron

@Phildani7 -- there is a UDP libray for the LM3S6965 you have -- just look in utils -- make sure you have Stellarisware 9107. If you are using CCS5 -- anothe project is to look at SysBIOS RTOS and maybe even FreeRTOS.

I got both working on the LM3S811 -- bit of a challenge.

Once you have an RTOS -- you can look at some really serious projects.

Iron

Do they even sell metal can op amps anymore?

Iron

(Am I about to get "barred" from CEC?)   :)   Uht-oh, here comes the bouncer...

Ah yes, 16.5KV yeow!

Iron

(In other words, it doesn't take me long to check the high voltage on a plate!!)

I lost my fingerprints on misclocked op amps.  I was more careful with fire bottles.

Iron

Good morning and happy Friday all. Feeling a lot like fall here in Edmonton, AB at 12C/53F.

Iron

Fire bottles?   Wow, haven't heard that term in a long time!   Yes, that's why I don't have any fingerprints and why I have a permanent H/V charlie horse in my elbow!   :)

hello everyone --- anothe great day in Big D

Iron

@JoeFromOzarks:  Did you start out on "fire bottles" too?

Iron

oh Joe...I'm sure everybody will like your posts...definitely not useless

Iron

One more thing - no project is ever truly finished.  Unless and until the funding stops.   :)

@Joe: Your posts are far from useless. Your enthusiasm is contagious!

Iron

Uht-oh, how does one go about deleting these useless posts of mine?

 

:)

hello from sonora, calif

 

Iron

One more thing:  a flowchart is invaluable.  Start -> finish.   A wise man once said "A mans got to know his limitations" just so you can break 'em.  And other said "Gotta have a plan, son."   (In so many words.)   :)   Now, time for the recliner...   :)

Hello everyone! from Canbridge, Ontario.

Iron

Most of the time I'm a "lurker."   :)   I learned electronics a long time ago, when current flow (through a wire) went from (-) to (+) and things that made light also made heat!   (grin)   Most of the time, when I comment, some youngster jumps in and tells me I'm wrong and I should get back in bed 'cause I missed my nap.   :)

Thank you. I like to logger with the RTC/Ethernet. But have to learn on how to send packets.

Iron

TGIF !!!

Good Morning/Afternoon from Sunny San Jose, CA. It's 62 °F right now and it will be 78 °F @ 2:30 PM.

Iron

Have fun guys -- lunch time -- maybe some ice cream too! :-)

Iron

@bobybacs -- The voltmeter is a good one -- with some electronics for autoswitching -- to make it tougher. :-)  The rest are sample programs included with Stellarisware -- so you can "cheat" properly! ;-)

Anyway the autoranging meter could keep Phil busy for an afternoon.

Joe -- I hunt the forums at TI e2e -- looking for problems as well. -- and fresh ideas of what to try.

Iron

Yes, start out easy.  The "hello world" blinking LED.   Before you know it, you'll end up like me, hunting the forums for problems others are having just so you'll have something to work on!!!  (grin)

@Joe -- agree with you on the "doodling" -- doodling makes learning harder -- since there are no goalposts. Good Point!

Iron

I guess the best way for a beginner is to take one peripheral of uC and do some simple project with it, for ex. take the serial port you can use it to create an echo program or for an ADC try to create a volt meter. This way you can practice the programming language and also learn the uC usage too

Iron

@phil -- Yesy I am considering that board as well as the LM4F232.  Since you have ethernet -- then maybe the next step is to send data to a PC -- via UDP packets and tie in an RTC so the samples can be organized via time stamp and sample number (you need both). The once that is done you really have the basis of a sophisticated logger.

I built that and it was able to talke to the Make Controler (ARM7) and an Arduino 2560 with Ethernet and gather data from two systems simultaneously.

Al written in Delphi -- the MAKE using the OSC -- and the Arduino using a custom Lib for the Bosch BMA180 (Accelerometer)  and the BMA085 -- air pressure and temp -- a Dallas1307 for RTC.

 

Iron

DaveWR is correct, a weather station can be tough.  But starting with a temp sensor and getting it working, then add a little LCD display, then maybe a wind speed cone with a voltage divider or a series of reed switches, you know, all very basic.  Then start heading into the "wild world."  My point was, without a defined project - a goal - all you'll be doing is doodling on a piece of scratch paper without a destination.   Instead of a weather station, a add-on project to your favorite hobby.   Anything.  Something to follow from start to finish.   :)

@Dave: Wow! Nice to know that someone had similar struggles. I am comfortable with Assembly, even ARM. But now trying with C, since with assembly I cannot do much. I have a LM3S6965. I tried the example programs. Wondering what to do next!

Iron

@phil and Joe --- A weather station is actually a tough project -- done right. Just get an accelerometer from Sparkfun or whoever.. MMA7361 on a Break out board should do it. Get that working and go from there.

Iron

@Joe: :) thank you again. what would you suggest that I start with? A home weather sys?

Iron

@phildani7 I just started with the Cortex M3 a mont agon LM3S811. Make sure you get the latest Stellaris ware and the latest version of the DVD. If you are not using CCS V5 (latest) logon to the supllier site and get the latest version of their tools.

There are many C and C+ tutorial sites -- just use Bing or Google to find them For me it is a struggle switching from Delphi and other languages as well.

Iron

Hello from Sunny SE Lake Simcoe in Ontario Canada.

Iron

Mmmmmmmmm.... chocolate.   (Okay, I'm going back to my rock and hide now...)    :)

Don't pick a project too difficult, and pick one already explored by the experienced.  (It's best to try and learn all you can (on a particular code segment) before checking the forums for guidance.   Then check and get the "oh wow!" moment!)    :)

Now I'm in the mood for ice cream.   Being retired is tough.   I'm headin' for the kitchen for ice cream, don't let Mr. Nickelsberg start without me...    :)

Oh yea, well, any mention of "rocky" and "road" in the same sentence brings ice cream to mind, my g/f is the same way.   :)

Hello from Fort Worth

Iron

ha ha "Without a goal, the (any) road is very rocky" :)

Iron

My comment?  You mean "Howdy folks!" ??   I'm a hillbilly.   (grin)

@Joe: Thank you. That makes a lot of sense. And my wife likes your comment :)

Iron

@phildani7  Do you have a project to work on?  If not, pick something, like a home weather station (for example) then as you add each device you'll learn the coding behind it.   Without a goal, the (any) road is very rocky.   :)

hi, im trying to play with stellaris cortex m3. Finding it difficult to get started with C.

Iron

Yes, just playing with M0.  I have M3 DevKit too, it's fun!   (I'm mostly a PICMicro (Microchip PIC32) guy, but I need the variety!)  (grin)

hi joe, do you work on cortex?

Iron

Can you recommend documentations!

Iron


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Last year you helped Design News and Allied Electronics crown its first-ever Gadget Freak of the Year, and we need your help again. Vote in round 2 of our second-annual contest.
The key to autonomous driving is not to forget about the driver, and to remember that passengers want a sense of control, as opposed to being utterly passive backseat drivers.
HP revealed more of its 3D printing plans in a recent webinar. Senior vice president of inkjet and graphics solution business Stephen Nigro spoke about how the technology works and expanded on HP's vision of open collaboration to commercialize its Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology for end-production, and open collaboration on new materials. He also said HP will create software to help users decide when to use Multi Jet Fusion versus conventional subtractive manufacturing.
Get a load of these strange product designs. What's in the water these design engineers are drinking?
The Dutch are known for their love of bicycling, and they’ve also long been early adopters of green-energy and smart-city technologies. So it seems fitting that a town in which painter Vincent van Gogh once lived has given him a very Dutch-like tribute -- a bike path lit by a special smart paint in the style of the artist's “Starry Night” painting.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service