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notarboca
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Gold
Re: Acceleration?
notarboca   8/14/2012 10:53:14 PM
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@Jon Titus--I, too, have questions about acceleration.  Would this require pressure suits for passengers, or perhaps some sort of encapsulated seat that would react to the G-forces?

Jon Titus
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Blogger
Acceleration?
Jon Titus   8/14/2012 6:42:57 PM
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Perhaps the rapid acceleration would kill the passengers and crew. Not a good way to start a new airline.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
different world today
NadineJ   8/14/2012 5:44:09 PM
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From my understanding, faster speed = high fuel consumption.  During the days of the Concorde, high fuel consumption wasn't seen as a problem.  Today, consumers and the market are more focused on things that, at least, appear to be good for the environment.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: West to East in less than an hour
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 5:23:12 PM
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Yes, it's the sonic boom that limits air speed over land:

http://www.discovery.com/area/skinnyon/skinnyon.html

Exceeding 660 miles per hour above sea level creates the boom. Once an aircraft breaks the sound barrier, it creats an extended boom that is heard by anyone who is near the supersonic craft. So it isn't just one single boom -- it's continuous as long as the craft is exceeding the the sound barrier, even if those on the ground experience it as a single boom. So, on a flight from L.A. to N.Y that exceeds the sound barrier, everyone on the ground between the two cities would experience the window-shaking (and sometimes window-breaking) boom.

NASA, however, is looking at strategies for taking the boom out of high speed aircraft:

http://www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/sonic_boom_chat.html

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: West to East in less than an hour
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 4:59:49 PM
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OK, that explains a lot. When I read the article -- which didn't address sonic booms -- I wondered whether the small size of the craft negated the sonic booms. Maybe they just take the boom over the ocean and move on.

richnass
User Rank
Blogger
Re: West to East in less than an hour
richnass   8/14/2012 4:56:38 PM
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I believe you are correct about the sonic booms. They had to be over the ocean before going to hyperspeed. The test run by the Pentagon today was also over the ocean.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
West to East in less than an hour
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 4:51:22 PM
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Yes, Rich, I also saw that CNN article, andI too was surprised. I was under the (perhaps mistaken) impression that speeds exceeding 600 mph would cause sonic booms that would be unacceptable to residents. And thus, there was a wall against faster speeds. Yet at 4,500 mph, why no sonic booms?

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Who's to Blame?
Jack Rupert, PE   8/14/2012 4:45:28 PM
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What's getting in the way of speed?  Is it just cost or is it, like usual, government regulation?  Even in its heyday, the Concorde was only allowed to fly at its advertised speed over open ocean.  I think it was "illegal" for them to fly a New York to LA route at those speeds.

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