HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Beth Stackpole   8/13/2012 7:53:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I have to admit, watching Zeno is a little bit like watching trailers from those infamous Chuckie movies--there's something still a little creepy about watching the adult interact with a non-human, toylike robot. On the other hand, I could see future iterations of this being a real help for helping autistic kids over the hump of social interactions. So despite some small hesitations, I do think robot technology is a great resource for helping treat this problem.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Rob Spiegel   8/13/2012 5:52:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Beth, this does have a degree of creepy to it. Yet, as a father of a teenage daughter with autism, I'll take any port in a storm. I've already seen how my daughter interacts well with computers, even as she is unable to create and sustain a simple friendship. My daughter would think Zeno is pretty cool. And I love the name of his skin: flubber.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Beth Stackpole   8/13/2012 6:29:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, you have far more experience and knowledge of how a child would react so I'm shelving any reservations based on your sound judgement. I've heard you speak in this forum many times about your daughter's love for computers and particularly the games and cell phone. Glad like something like Zeno has possibilities for making life easier for her and your entire family.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Rob Spiegel   8/13/2012 6:43:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Honestly, Beth, I also have reservations about many, many devices, but in the area of autism, you try everything. When my daughter was young, we tried a series of drugs, which had no value at all. In many ways, a device, whether a laptop or some of the childhood learning gadgets, is much less of a risk. 

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
mrdon   8/13/2012 7:20:34 PM
NO RATINGS
The field of robotics is truly being stretched, no pun intended, by using aiding children with autism. I know MIT has done a bunch of research on building robots that respond to human emotions. At MIT Professor Rosalind Picard is the pioneer in Autism Theory and Technology. She teaches a course on the subject where students explore  "the converging challenges and goals of autism research and new technologies - including networked, wearable, and robotic - that have increasingly human-like social, emotional, and communication skills." For additional information, the course website is included below.

http://courses.media.mit.edu/2011spring/mas771/

The link below is the MIT OCW (Open Courseware) for the her class as well.

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/media-arts-and-sciences/mas-771-autism-theory-and-technology-spring-2011/

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 9:23:27 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the links, MrDon. I didn't realize MIT was engaged in this research and coursework. This is terrific.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
mrdon   8/14/2012 12:20:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob,

Your quite welcome. Yeah, MIT has some wonderful OCW material. I'm always going to the website for project ideas and design inspiration for my ITT Tech Electronics Engineering Technology classes I teach. Speaking of robotics, here's 2 cool MIT OCW courses you might find interesting.

Mobile Autonomous Systems Laboratory:

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-186-mobile-autonomous-systems-laboratory-january-iap-2005/

 

Autonomous Robot Design Competition:

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-270-autonomous-robot-design-competition-january-iap-2005/lecture-notes/

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little creepy, but definitely on the right track
Ann R. Thryft   8/13/2012 7:19:42 PM
NO RATINGS
This looks like a brilliant app for robotics. I don't know any people with autism, but I do known some on different points of the Asperger's scale. They're all highly talented, many in technical areas. One who used to be my movie buddy could have benefited from this robot. He would often ask me to define what emotions an actor was conveying, as he found it hard to read the subtleties in people's facial expressions. Interestingly, his favorite childhood fantasy was being a robot, and as an adult he could still do a very good imitation.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
iPad solution
Charles Murray   8/13/2012 9:53:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I recall that 60 Minutes did a piece on the iPad and its effect on autistic children. I don't know why technology seems to work so well for autistic kids, but if it works, I would assume that it would be far more desirable than most medications.  

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: iPad solution
Mydesign   8/14/2012 12:39:11 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Charles, autism is effecting in brain. So their understanding and communication skills become weaker. So special education software and tools are required for them to get understand about things. From last several months am associating with an organization, which is doing charity work for kids with autism and other disabilities. We are planning for develop some special software and tools for e-learning of kids having autism.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: iPad solution
Beth Stackpole   8/14/2012 8:26:20 AM
NO RATINGS
I think technology is both calming and engaging, but also repetitive and structured--potentially a good mix for autistic kids as opposed to the freeforall that can be human emotions.


Thanks for the links @mrdon: I'm sure those will be really helpful for those who want to learn more about this research.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: iPad solution
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 9:19:02 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Beth. With technology, there are no unspoken rules. If nothing else, technology is literal.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: iPad solution
mrdon   8/14/2012 12:23:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Beth,

Your quite welcome. MIT is truly one of many innovative universities working to solve real world problems using cool and fun technology. Here's a link to all of their OCW course material. Enjoy!!!

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Autism Treatment
Mydesign   8/14/2012 12:34:11 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Elizabeth, there are lots of kids and grown up peoples living in and around our country with autism. Recently I had associating and start working with a NGO unit, which take cares about the children having autism. Through that organization we are trying to develop some special software with enriched graphics and GUI for e-learning purpose, which can help them for a better understanding and learning. Personally I know the difficulties and challenges in treating the autism and i hope the new innovation can bring a major change in treatment.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Great work
notarboca   8/14/2012 1:29:17 AM
NO RATINGS
My son is a teenager who is diagnosed as high functioning on the Asperger's scale.  He has learned as he has grown older to respond appropriately to the emotions of others, and to control his own.  I wish Zeno would have been available about 10 years ago, as this type of stimulus/therapy would have enabled him to "catch up" so much quicker, given his interest interest in computers and technology.  A big pat on the back to everyone engaged in this sort of research--you are making a difference.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great work
Elizabeth M   8/14/2012 12:05:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for sharing your personal experience. It's my understanding that robots like Zeno can work with older children and adults as well, so perhaps it's not too late for your son to engage in this sort of treatment to continue the progress he has already made. I wish you the best and thank you again for your interest.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great work
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2012 1:06:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Elizabeth. Actually, in my case, it's my daughter. However, the greater incidence is with boys. There are 4.3 boys with autism for every one girl. Technology has always been a big part of my daughter's life -- that and animals -- both more so than friends.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Humanoid Robot Used to Treat Autism
warren@fourward.com   8/16/2012 7:17:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting how autism increased just as they modified the shots they give the babies to include mercury.  Hmmmm.

But, I am on board with any innovation that will help these families.  There is nothing sadder than not being able to reach one's potential, and if these robots can help then we need them now!  If there is a way to reach them, I am glad it is an engineer doing it!



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The new draw-it-on-a-napkin is the CAD program. As CAD programs become more ubiquitous and easier to use, they have replaced 2D sketching for early concepting.
These free camps are designed for children ages 10 to 18. Attendees are introduced to 3D CAD software and shown how 3D printers can make their work a reality. Here we check out the stops in California and Utah.
A University of Chicago graduate has invented a compact elliptical trainer that lets people work out at their desk while they work.
Dean Kamen told an audience at MD&M East 2014 that FDA regulators aren't to blame for stalling innovation in the medical device industry. Hear what he had to say.
Battery maker LG Chem Power Inc. plans to offer a new cell chemistry that could serve as the foundation for an affordable electric car with a 200-mile driving range by 2017.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service