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BRedmond
User Rank
Silver
Re: Rocket
BRedmond   9/11/2014 12:44:48 PM
NO RATINGS
A water rocket isn't really compatible with a video camera.

My kids got a kick out of "Stomp Rockets" when they were little.  "Tweens" and teens could handle an air rocket launched with 45# of air if they can handle Estes rockets (as 12-18 year old Boy Scouts can).

margaretBarnfield
User Rank
Iron
Rocket
margaretBarnfield   4/5/2014 5:07:19 AM
NO RATINGS
That was a cool rocket for adults. But for children, it's nice to have a water rocket. It's warm outside, your children are looking for brand new outdoor entertainments and you also want to stimulate their minds during the long break from school. Why not teach them about Sir Isaac Newton's third law of motion by learning how to make a water rocket? Instruction in equal and opposite reaction has never been so cool, cheap and fun.

ChuckHall
User Rank
Iron
Original Idea?
ChuckHall   4/10/2013 9:23:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Hello,

 I feel that the article implies that Mr. Conner CREATED the idea of placing a camera on his rocket. Nothing is further from the truth than that. A quote from the article: "Then a brainstorm hit. What if you could watch the flight from the rocket's point of view?".  In the 1960's, the Estes Model Rocket Company sold two cameras for this purpose. One, a still-shot was called "Camroc", and the other a motion-picture camera, "Cineroc". The Germans during World War II deployed launch cameras on their V2 rockets and Robert Goddard did it way before that.

 I only mention this because of my objection to the way the article was written, not to detract from anything Mr. Conner did. I believe that any young person interested in rocketry might not be aware of the history of rocket cams and assume something otherwise.

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Rockets
Tool_maker   12/4/2012 6:46:56 AM
NO RATINGS
 Actually mine was a two stage rocket. I never thought of using soda, but I can see where it would work better and I can imagine the sticky mess. Some times I would manually release the top rocket and leave the base rocket in place. I do not remember why, only that I did it.

 Emilio Lizardo
User Rank
Iron
Re: Rockets
Emilio Lizardo   12/4/2012 3:38:43 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, I had the single stage air over water rocket as a kid too! I would pump it up as much as I could to get it to go ever higher and higher. I also varied the water level over and below the water level mark on the translucent rocket body, trying to see if more air or more water would take it to higher altitude. Finally in an epiphany I tried 7Up! It sent the rocket to record heights. Unfortunately at the launch pad I was a wet sticky mess and my mother began to suspect the sudden high consumption rate and my sudden interest in her favorite summer beverage. My rocket fuel was rationed afterward...  Great memories, thank you !

proper
User Rank
Iron
Valve Safety
proper   11/30/2012 10:46:10 AM
NO RATINGS
WARNING: Find and use a valve designed for handling air pressure.  I was an irrigation valve engineer for 19 years and PVC valves rated for 150 psi water pressure are not safe handling air pressure.  The faster parts motions associated with air induce higher part impact stresses than with water.  The in-line valve is better, but there was a lawsuit we had where someone shot their eye out using air pressure to blow-out and winterize an Antisiphon style irrigation valve.  And then there will be those that wan to go launch higher and keep creeping up the launch pressure.  Wear your safty glasses!

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Rockets
Tool_maker   9/13/2012 3:40:07 PM
As a kid I had a rocket that was partially filled with water and then attached to a hand operated air pump. As the air was pumped into the rocket body it passed through the water and built up pressure. When the rocket was released from the pump, it expelled the water which forced the rocket upwards. There was even a second stage that mounted on top of the first and was secured with some sort of pressure valve. When the first stage was emptied, the valve would release the second stage. It has probably been 50-55 years ago and i do not remember how high it went, but it was enough that the projectiles would land several houses one way or the other.

I was the only kid on the block that had one and I never saw another, so I do not know how popular they were. Today they would probably be outlawed because the projectile did have some weight and I am sure there is a lawsuit there somewhere. It finally cracked on landing and no glue that I could find would return it to its air/water tight state.

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Nice project
Cadman-LT   9/12/2012 12:31:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice project and very respectable heights. 

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Rocket design variations
mrdon   8/26/2012 9:29:54 PM
NO RATINGS
gsmith120...I always believe in continual improvement of products using cool electronics tech. Thanks for the comment.

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Rocket design variations
gsmith120   8/26/2012 7:56:54 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree very nice!! Thanks for sharing.

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