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Tim
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Platinum
Re: Good Slap on old B/W TV
Tim   8/10/2012 7:42:08 PM
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Growing up, we had a TV from about 1970.  In the 90's, we bought a VCR and after a few years, the TV required a good smack on top of it every time we used the VCR to alleviate a wavy screen.  This worked for a few years until we got a new TV.  I do not know what the smack did, but it felt good and it worked.

RICKZ28
User Rank
Platinum
Good Slap on old B/W TV
RICKZ28   8/10/2012 7:00:22 PM
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When I was growing up, we only had one TV as was typical in those days...a knob-tuning black and white 19-inch tube TV.  From a very young age, I remember the standard family practice to get a better picture was to slap the top of the TV with an open hand...and it worked!  (My Dad was an EE.)  That old TV lasted forever though, so I was a teenager by the time we got a new-fangled color TV.


I haven't had to smack TV's since, except for when they broke after a few years.  The old TV's seem to last much longer.  I hope my new LCD HDTV's last a good few years, but I recently had to replace our first LCD TV at four years old.


The cost to repair electronics these days always seems to equal or exceed the cost of a new unit, so that means disposable consumer electronics.

Droid
User Rank
Platinum
A smack fixed my Dell Power Supply
Droid   8/10/2012 4:37:14 PM
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What can I say - A few months back the power supply for my Dell laptop died. Like any good DIY fixer, I gave it a few small bumps and noticed the little green light flicker.  Seeing some hope, I gave it a good forceful smack - and the thing came back to life.  Its still going.  

Sometime smacking can work for computers also.   I know a couple people at work who have used the smacking technique - or perhaps more accurately described as the pick-it-up-and-slam-it-down technique.  While this did not actually "fix" the computer, it successfully made it completely inoperable which meant that our computer tech friends had to finally quite fooling with the old PC and bring them a new one.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Its not the Engineering as much as it IS the Market
Ann R. Thryft   8/10/2012 12:27:35 PM
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Nancy, I'm with you on that thought. Some of them get it and see the need for recycling, etc., but I think the whole concept of throwaway products is what they're used to, so it's a fish-in-water thing.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Its not the Engineering as much as it IS the Market
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 12:11:11 PM
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I agree Ann, and it is a shame. A telling point is that our teenage kids do not expect longevity in products - for them, throw-away is the norm and they are the next generation...

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: tried and true repair technique
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 12:08:50 PM
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Percussive repair using my troubleshooting hammer - I like it!

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Its not the Engineering as much as it IS the Market
Ann R. Thryft   8/10/2012 12:06:27 PM
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Nancy, I think all TVs were like that in the 50s and 60s, and so were stereo systems (but not the record player!). Like you, I've been surprised, and disappointed, to see just how short consumer electronics lifecycles have become. The throwaway society does not encourage good consumer product or machine design, among other things.

sysdesign
User Rank
Iron
tried and true repair technique
sysdesign   8/10/2012 11:57:17 AM
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Use to call it percussive repair.  Got to know where to pound, kick or slap though.  Lately it seems that dislocated shoulders are using same technique;-).

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Know Where to Smack!
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 11:17:41 AM
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gafisher - Smacking the salesperson's desk sounds pretty satisfying too...or the desk of the Sony rep who thought the problem was just an isolated incident...the problem is, these people are unreachable - the product was purchased at a Best Buy or some such store with an extended warranty added at the cash register.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Feel good factor
wbswenberg   8/10/2012 11:07:28 AM
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My job at a local aerospace manufacturer included repooling mecury wetted relays.  Just had to smack it on the bench in the right direction.  Most times it worked.  If not then it was time to replace one of the relays.  Also repsitioning or resequencing the boards would help to identify just which one was bad.  The other thing I did was vacuum the ATE to the tune of $35/ hr.  What a job!

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