HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
John
User Rank
Gold
3D controls and views
John   8/9/2012 9:56:03 AM
NO RATINGS
These are really neat, usefull, and not to mention fun.  I wish I worked for a company that would spring for $75 mice like the one I purchased because it has 19 buttons and track resolution is completely adjustable.  I would have my stereoscopic glasses at work except the monitors are 60hz refresh.  But wait... I am using a $7,000 workstation with 12 Xeon cores nearly 3Ghz each and it came with a $10 two button mouse/keyboard combo.  I would love to see 3D devices in the work place, but I am afraid it's the employee who will be purchasing these things.  Until things get a lot cheaper it's the massive multiplayer online gaming mouse for me.  Heck, it even has that wow factor where the buttons eluminate and dim. 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D controls and views
Beth Stackpole   8/9/2012 10:28:44 AM
NO RATINGS
@John: You raise a good point at how to make the business case so employers actually invest in these devices for their engineers. That can be a pricey purchase for someone to make on their own.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Clever Innovations
Greg M. Jung   8/9/2012 1:44:16 PM
NO RATINGS
@Beth:  I'll admit, at first this knob movement felt strange and awkward.  However, my left hand quickly got up the learning curve and became used to the required motions.  By the end of the week, I found myself subconsciously reaching for the knob to rotate and zoom the model with my left hand instead of using the standard mouse picks with my right hand mouse.  Overall, I liked the idea of using two hands to manipulate and create CAD models (instead of mostly using just one).

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Open to change
tekochip   8/9/2012 4:20:22 PM
NO RATINGS
I think Engineers are probably more open to change than most people, since we are always working with new tools and technology, but it seems that the average person is reluctant to change.  I always get a kick out of people opening up their laptop and the trying to find extra space to plug in a mouse into it rather than using the touchpad or other input device on the laptop.


bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Crazy stuff
bobjengr   8/9/2012 5:43:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth, I definitely agree with you on this one.   My wife and one of our sons surprised me with a Kindle Fire for my last birthday.  I have been working with this marvelous device for several days now and have found the operation remarkable in that there is no real strain on my wrists or hands.  The apps that can be downloaded do just about all of the things I need done and then some.  I would gladly move my computer mouse to the shelf if I could use the tablet.  I can see a tremendous advantage for a CAD or CAE operators that live on a computer day after day. I  had no idea there were as many "options" relative to data entry.  I suspect most if not all of these are on the "market" right now and can be purchased.   Great post.

 

 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Open to change
Beth Stackpole   8/10/2012 8:05:29 AM
NO RATINGS
@tekochip: No doubt people hate change and you count me among that mix. The idea of having to learn new things simply to handle the day-to-day tasks that you do everyday is where people typically have the most opposition. But as you say, it's opening yourself up to new ways of working that ultimately might save you time and help you do a better job in the process.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Crazy stuff
Charles Murray   8/13/2012 10:39:08 PM
NO RATINGS
If you haven't seen Minority Report, Beth, you should see it. Tom Cruise opens and closes screens and moves things around by waving his arms and using his hands, in a way the way that I imagine is similar to what you've described here. Also, I have a hunch you're right about Spielberg's connection to Jobs. I don't know anyone else who could have imagined that so accurately years before it actually happened.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Crazy stuff
Beth Stackpole   8/14/2012 8:21:55 AM
NO RATINGS
If he imagined the gesture interface of today back then (without a peak from his buddy Steve Jobs) then Speilberg missed out on the opportunity to count tech genius among his many talents. I'll have to check out the movie, Chuck. Thanks for the heads up!

Dave
User Rank
Gold
Kinect represents the start of touchless manipulation.
Dave   9/17/2012 10:53:01 AM
NO RATINGS
I think not enough credit was given to Microsoft's Kinect system, which was originally created for XBox and is now being integrated into many no-touch devices due to its low cost (resulting from large scale production).

It would not surprise me at all if this incredible device is integrated into the upcoming Windows 8 suit of computers, tablets, and phones. Exciting times are here; that is for certain!

JD-STL
User Rank
Iron
Minority Report interface is Oblong Industries
JD-STL   9/17/2012 12:03:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth, John Underkoffler was the designer of the "Minority Report" interface. He later worked to make it real at Oblong Industries. Go to their website to check it out.

 

<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The phablet wars continue. Today we welcome the Nexus 6 -- a joint collaboration between Google and Motorola.
According to a study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, one of the factors in the collapse of the original World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, was the reduction in the yield strength of the steel reinforcement as a result of the high temperatures of the fire and the loss of thermal insulation.
If you have a Gadget Freak project, we have a reader who wants to make it. And not only will you get your 15 minutes of fame on our website and social media channels, you will also receive $500 and be automatically entered into the 2015 Gadget Freak of the Year contest.
Robots are getting more agile and automation systems are becoming more complex. Yet the most impressive development in robotics and automation is increased intelligence. Machines in automation are increasingly able to analyze huge amounts of data. They are often able to see, speak, even imitate patterns of human thinking. Researchers at European Automation call this deep learning.
Thanksgiving is a time for family. A time for togetherness. A time for… tech?
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service