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Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
Jack Rupert, PE   8/9/2012 10:21:46 AM
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Great idea @lynnbr2.  Anything that makes safety reviews and maintenance easier increases the likelihood that it will be performed.  I like the idea of IR friendly glass which not only makes the checks easier, in many cases it means the checks do not require a process shutdown.

schmadel
User Rank
Iron
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
schmadel   8/9/2012 10:53:54 AM
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The thermal system explained by lynnbr2 is a good approach. There are inexpensive point and click systems that use a laser beam to determine the emissivity at a particular wavelength, and then a thermal sensor to measure the emission near that wavelength. These hand held systems are sold for consumers for use in kitchens for measuring the temperature of a pot, or a roast, or a pot roast...  But when using a thermal approach one must have the circuit under significant power.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
Rob Spiegel   8/9/2012 11:30:28 AM
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Interesting, Schmadel. So these use both laser and a thermal sensor and they're still not expensive.

schmadel
User Rank
Iron
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
schmadel   8/9/2012 12:19:39 PM
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Hi Bob,

Here's a link to some optical thermometers.

http://www.allqa.com/IRcompare.htm

Some use IR lasers for the emissivity calibration, some use additional sighting lasers in the visible, and some have no lasers.

I also recal seeing our HVAC people using some with red sighting lasers to check hydronic heating systems.

These things seem to range in the $50 to $500 range.

-Don

schmadel
User Rank
Iron
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
schmadel   8/9/2012 12:20:56 PM
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Sorry, I mean to type "Rob" not "Bob".

-Don

lynnbr2
User Rank
Platinum
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
lynnbr2   8/9/2012 12:31:24 PM
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an e-book on IR Viewports which includes basic design and application information is available at: http://www.iriss.com/Ten_things_about_Infrared-Windows_enquiry_form.php  

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
Rob Spiegel   8/9/2012 12:32:33 PM
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Those prices seem reasonable, Schmadel. How about accuracy. Do they catch most of the problems -- or potential problems?

schmadel
User Rank
Iron
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
schmadel   8/13/2012 1:35:15 PM
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Hi Rob,

Sorry to take so long to get back to you.

I cant' be of much help as I've never used any of these systems to discover overheated connections. The systems, like those provided by Omega, boast an accracy of about 1 degree C. This should be fine for line-of-sight instances. But for connections inside panels something like the glass covers mentioned by lynnbr2 might work.

Incidentally, the link to ElectroPhysics didn't mention anything about glass covers.

-Don

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: FLIR Camera to identify hot spots
Rob Spiegel   8/13/2012 5:27:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Sounds like it's limited what it might catch. 

mblazer
User Rank
Silver
I2R means heat
mblazer   8/16/2012 4:19:21 PM
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I had a similar problem with our test station when I was in the Air Force.  We were blowing the B phase fuse about once per day.  First 45A fuses and then 60A ones.  The Clamp-On Ammeter that we were only drawing 17A on each phase.  It turned out water had gotten into the box and corroded the contact under the fuse clip.  The fuse wasn't blowing, it was melting.  After 3 more visits from Civil Engineering, and explaining Ohms Law, they replaced the box.

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