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naperlou
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Competition by design
naperlou   8/6/2012 8:44:22 AM
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This type of attention to detail helps take sport to the highest level.  By optimizing the equipment, it all comes down to the athlete taking advantage of what they have. 

It is interestging, though, when talking about the material waste of the manual method and comparing that to the softwarre costs.  I wonder if it is really less expensive.  Those packages are very expensive.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Competition by design
Beth Stackpole   8/6/2012 9:51:19 AM
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@Naperlou: I'm not sure material waste was the driving factor for this initiative, but rather a pleasant side outcome. The real goal was to optimize the kayakers' performance. As for the software costs, expensive, but becoming less so. And given that this was done via affiliations with different research and university entities, I'm sure they'd already made an investment in the software. But your point is well taken that this isn't a quick fix or cheap endeavor.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Competition by design
Ann R. Thryft   8/6/2012 5:27:53 PM
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What a great app for 3D scanning and software tech. Considering how snug the fit of a kayak should be, this custom approach to building them makes a lot of sense. I wonder what other sports apps could benefit from similarly-designed customized equipment?

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Competition by design
Beth Stackpole   8/7/2012 8:52:47 AM
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Good question, Ann. I would think the same technology could play a role for custom fit ski boots, types of bicycle equipment (seats come to mind), even perhaps for the luge in the winter Olympics. Once you start contemplating the technology, the possibilities seem to stack up.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Competition by design
Rob Spiegel   8/6/2012 5:56:10 PM
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It's great to see technology applied to the Olympic sports. This is a great example. I also like the Blade Runner. I would imagine his artificial legs went through a lot if iterations before the came up with the legs that performed so well in the Olympics.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Competition by design
bobjengr   8/14/2012 8:54:52 PM
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I agree Rob.  I would love to know the iterations the blade runner went through during the design phase of his prosthetic limbs.   I think his optimism becomes legendary and demonstrates the great marriage between engineering design and the ability of those designs to make better the lives of those with disabilities.  This guy probably does not think he is a hero but I certainly do. 

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Competition by design
Rob Spiegel   8/15/2012 10:09:55 AM
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A hero indeed, Bobjengr. One thing I've always wondered is how the stump can take the pressure of a pounding run. Perhaps the prosthetic limbs absorb some of the impact.

TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Re: Competition by design
TJ McDermott   8/7/2012 3:48:04 PM
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Naperlou, I also wondered at this.  Professional race teams take a lower technology approach to making the drivers' seats.  Those are at least as conformal as the kayak fitout kits, but they do it using foam molds of the drivers' posteriors.

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Going Behind the Scenes
Jennifer Campbell   8/6/2012 10:23:17 AM
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It's cool to get an in-depth behind-the-scenes look at some of the things these accomplished athletes do in order to excel in their sport. (We've also seen advancements in swimwear.) It makes the Games, at least for me, that much more fun to watch.

I wonder if there is a story here that involves gymnastics, too - maybe a materials angle? I heard an interview with one of the gymnasts who said the floor in London is not as "springy" as the floors they trained on in the US.

Quiles
User Rank
Iron
Re: Going Behind the Scenes
Quiles   8/7/2012 10:46:51 AM
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Yes the Gymnastics Vault table was redesigned for the 2000 Olympics because a lot of accidents and deaths. It has more surface area and springs that help the athletes get more lift. You saw that the Girl's American gymnast McKayla Maroney used the spring better than the Chinese Olympic champion and had a higher lift on her events.

Stephen I. Mayo
User Rank
Iron
Australian kayak technology
Stephen I. Mayo   8/7/2012 11:42:48 AM
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At first, I thought the subject article was going to address customizing the kayak craft itself to the athlete/rower.  The seat customization is impressive alone, but you have to wonder how long before someone in the field starts taking a basic kayak "shell" (perhaps omitting the cutout for the athlete/rower, providing some extra polyethylene/fiberglass at the item's ends, adjusting other features and fixtures etc.) in anticipation of a final stage of manufacture in which the unit is "individualized," "fitted-out" or "trued/customized" to the specific weight, height, center of gravity, even gender of the eventual user of the craft.  Using the same scanning and graphing techniques as noted in the piece, this idea would seem to be a logical next step.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Australian kayak technology
Beth Stackpole   8/7/2012 11:53:18 AM
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@Stephen: Definite possibility for the next step, but definitely starting to edge into really expensive territory. Then again, when you're talking about major competitions like the Olympics, I suppose cost isn't really the driving issue. Thanks for pointing out.



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