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jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Collaboration tool
jmiller   7/31/2012 8:49:51 PM
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I think you hit it right on the head.  Engineers are now having to collaborate throughout the world.  And this may be the next tool that makes it a little easier requiring a little less travel and trouble.

giffycard
User Rank
Iron
Autodesk, has made an effective business purchase!!
giffycard   7/31/2012 2:53:01 PM
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I think that the idea of having a video auto-capture feature/software access is very effective ideal and concept considering that more and more feild engineers, doctors, teachers, and students, can share effectively live in real-time, exams, course work, and production work to increase effective constructive communications between students, associates, and business partners, good idea and purchase Autodesk!!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Collaboration tool
Rob Spiegel   7/31/2012 1:23:03 PM
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This makes perfect sense as a collaboration tool, especially for engineers who travel regularly. The $60M pricetag shows that Autodest values this functionality. 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: It could be usefull
Beth Stackpole   7/31/2012 9:16:11 AM
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I agree Naperlou, that this particular acquisition is more about Autodesk's effort on the consumer side and less applicable for true professional engineers (perhaps a small segment), even though they'd like to think there's more interest.

But I disagree with your thoughts on social media being a fad (although, I sometimes wish that were so). While I wouldn't place a bet on Facebook or Google+ or any of the other existing platforms and technologies, I do think the way people are getting accustomed to communicating, collaborating, and sharing every mind-numbing tidbit that crosses their path will remain in some shape or form for the foreseeable future. That is until the tides turn, as they always do, and we shift back to a more traditional way of communicating. In some ways, technology advances are driving a type of communication and constant flow of information that I'm not sure the general populace wants or needs. But it's going to take a long time before that realization comes to be, especially as a generation raised on this as the norm enters the workplace.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
It could be usefull
naperlou   7/31/2012 9:08:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Using video to educate customers is well established.  Allowing video to be created and edited may have some use in the design process.  I am not sure of what "social media" brings to this.  You don't need social media tools to create videos. 

Actually, I was asking my favorite source of everything hip for the younger generation of prospecitve engineers, my son, about sociall media.  I thnk it may be a passing fad.  In the WSJ recently there was an article about how all the major social media companies were in trouble.  Their stock was not doing well.  Do you remember Google+.  I like it better than facebook, but I don't use it much.  I deleted my facebook account becuase it had been hacked.  The only social media company that is doing well is LinkedIn.  The primary media there is discussion groups (Design News has one).  My source tells me this is where he, and his friends are spending their time.  Don't forget, these fads go fast.  Remember Myspace?

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