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I think there is another technology which is very popular spreading in news these days, That is "FinFET" technology.

Iron

Very nice stuff. Particularly the comparison of Human vs IC in periodic table.

Iron

I am wondering about signal and power integrity phenomena in SoC. Are there any limitation / issues?

Very good comparison of periodic elements in human beings versus integrated circuits

I certainy remember pre-IC, born in 1947. The tubes were never reliable for more than a few months at most. 

Yes, the jokes were funny. More.

I think there are too many non-academic comments. It takes forever to read after the fact. 

Iron

I have enjoyed slides with Max' talk.

Iron

life before it?  lots of books, board games, bicycles..

 

Iron

Nice to know some details .. excellent refresher.

Iron

Very interesting. I have always wondered about haw these are made.

Iron

pargraff,

before IC's, I remember 6.3VAC filiment transformers. Almost every radio or TV had one.

 

Iron

Very interesting

Seems like the technology is constantly evolving

The joke was great 

When I was first in college I rember working at the original IBM PC Store. Most of my work involed working on computers in doctor and legal offices. Typewritters were being replaced and these were the only places which had computers for the most part. Now every one has several.

Hello picking up another lecture a day or so late

Thanks Rich and Max.

Iron

and keep the jokes flowing

Iron

Hi everyone yesterday.

Iron

Sorry, I didn't greet anyone today.

Iron

How are the questions used for grading?

Iron

Are questions posted to an archived class considered?

Iron

anyone else so late for this sesion ?

Iron

Thanks a lot Max; it was really wonderfull

Iron

This series is a great refresher!

I do remember days before chips - Vaccum tubes & then deisrete transistor based radios

Catching up today's class

@Max can you tell some stuff about FRAM..

Iron

and also the heat dissapation of the CPU being greater?

Iron

Max, The clock frequency has gotten progressively faster over the years.  Is this due to the different lattices being able to take the higher frequencies?

Iron

@ErrantMule

In some ways bandwidth is the least important parameter.  For a 100 MHz clock rate, you need a bandwidth of at least 350 MHz.  More important are things like triggering, sampling rate (for digital scopes), pulse capture, etc.  It would take at least an hour to explain all of the factors involved.  Look here http://www.tek.com/learning/oscilloscope-tutorial for tutorials.

Iron

If it's green or wriggles, it's biology.
If it stinks, it's chemistry.
If it doesn't work, it's physics.
It it's useful, it's engineering.
        - Anonymous

Blogger

OK -- sorry everyone -- I have to go myself -- more later -- C U Tomorrow -- please pass the word about this course to your friends and co-workers -- also spread the word via Twitter and LinkedIn and suchlike...

Blogger

When someone tells a engineering joke, people laugh. 
When someone tells a bagpipe joke, people nod in solemn agreement.

Iron

There's also DDR ram that stands dor "double data rate" -- the idea here is that instead of just clocking (reading/writing) it on one edge of the clock (like the rising edge) you do so on both edges of the clock...

Blogger

Max and Rich - thanks for another great class!   Gotta run - see you tomorrow

@Stevo1900: There is something called SDRAM -- this stands for Synchronous DRAM -- explaining what that means is beyond my abaility using this comment field (grin)

Blogger

@GeoSei: Steve Wozniak has one of these watches also -- he is on the record as saying that out of all the "techno-geek" things he's seen, this is the one he wishes he'd invented himself

Blogger

I shall!  Thanks much!

Iron

Is there such a thing as SD DDR RAM? Or am I thinking of something else?

Iron

@ErrantMule: Make sure you are in the course tomorrow to get the answer :-)

Blogger

@GeoSei: I love "tubes" -- in fact my pride and joy is a Nixie Tube Watch http://www.cathodecorner.com/nixiewatch/

 

Blogger

Max: thanks very much. I'll look there in the meantime.  I've looked at all the stuff on vendor sites but it seems to be geared to people who are beyond beginner level.

 

Iron

@ErrantMule -- that's a good question -- I'm going to email it to the Editor in Chief of the www.ScopeJunction.com website and ask him -- I'll try to get you an answer by tomorrow

Blogger

Max,

My first Frequency Counter designed by Hewlet Packard had at least 50 vacuum tubes. Each digit was repsented by a vertical column of neon light bulbs labeled 0 thru 9. I believe it went as high as 10 Mhz.

After it died, I discovered that it had a temperature controlled oven with a 100 Khz Crystal inside for the time-base and also several diiodes used for other purposes. I believe it was one of the first counters made using combined solid state and vacuum tube technology circa 1956 give or take a few years. I purchased it in 1976 at a local school rummage sale for just $5.00

Iron

One thing to note is that DRAM requires periodic accessing to keep it from forgetting things. SRAM does not. This makes using SRAM much easier but more expensive (due to issues Max noted).

Why do bagpipers walk when they play? To get away from the noise..!

Iron

So much for patience being virtuous. Queue jumping and the 'squeaky wheel' principle seem to apply.

 

How does one know what oscilloscope bandwidth is required for a design? e.g. if MCU is 100MHz, what bandwidth of oscope is required? Is that the right question to ask?

Iron

Re ZRAM, TRAM and TTRAM -- truth to tell I haven't heard of those -- but you can bet I'll be looking them up after this chat :-)

Blogger

Are they still making ZRAM, TRAM and TTRAM?

Iron

vlad, I don't know if this is the best venue to request free consulting on your engineering problems. This is a basic introductory fundamentals class, right?

(re:We use pig transmitters that emit low frequency signals and a receiver is supposed to accurately track that signal but our receiver catches any undesired low frequency signal which is not necessarily the one from the transmitter. What is the ideal way to get rid of this problem?)

 

Iron

DRAM is like SRAM in that it's volatile (it forgets things when power is removed from the system). That's when we move to Flash. Flash memory is non-volatile -- it remembers its contents when power is removed from the system. So in your computer we use Flash to store the bottom-level boot code -- ebnough to get th ecomputer started so that it can read the next level of th eoperating system off a hard disk drive.

Blogger

So in a computer system SRAM is used for the on-chip cache memory and anywhere else you need the highest speed, while DRAM is used to provide the bulk storage -- when you see a computer tha tboasts "4GB of RAM" -- it's DRAM theyu are talking about...

Blogger

Thank you Max.  The lecture was supper interesting. Bye

Iron

vlad - perhaps redundancy?    parity or error-correction bits?

@Vlad -- I'm really not an expert on this topic

Blogger

DRAM syands for Dynamic RAM -- in thsi case each cell is formed from a capacitor and a transistor (the capacitor is formed using transistor level processes -- even better tha tcapacitir is formed on top of the transistor (or vice versa -- I can;t remember). The advantage of DRAM is that it's very dense (close-packed) you gan get a lot of it in a chip. Also it is low on power consumption. The disadvantage is that it's slower than SRAM

Blogger

MAX can you please throw some light on my question?

Iron

 

vlad - ever consider modulating the signal to be able to identify it?

 

yes i did try that but it gives the same issue

Iron

I thought the bagpipe joke was funny.

Iron

about packaging - I remember the first time I saw surface-mounted chips.   seemed so obvious (in retrospect, of course) - I used to take broken DIPs, put them on the table and push down so the legs would bend underneath.   wish I'd've thought of soldering them that way...

SRAM stands for static RAM -- the name is historical -- a single SRAM cell stores 1 bit of information (a 0 or a 1). The cell is formed from 4 to 6 transistors. SRAM is volatile -- when you power the system off it forgets what it was storing. SRAM is very fast but it consumes a lot of power and the 4 to 6 transistors occupy a lot of silicon real-estate (relatively speaking)

Blogger

@vlad, by the way, in-band interference also comes from rotating metal parts such as engines or moving vehicles within the detection range.

Iron

Good Joke was funny. Love bagpipe jokes. Thanks

Iron

the transmitter emits electromagnetic pulses of freq 15 to 30 Hz which the receiver is supposed to track above ground but due to random movements of the receiver antenna the unit falsely thinks it detects 15 to 30 hz signal but its actually not from the transmitter?

 

any opinion MAX?

Iron

I got here late... Did you address the relationship between the sampling rate, the number of bits per sample and the coeffients of the Fourier series for the waveform one is converting from analog to digital? JUST KIDDING!
I'm really writing to express my disappointment having missed bagpipe joke.

...and to suggest that maybe these presentatins have TWO posting areas side by side. One for everyone who wants to discuss their audio quality, and another one to discuss the ACTUAL PRESENTATION. Is that possible?

Iron

Meant SRAM vs DRAM?

Iron

can a regular microphone record the 30 Hz signals?

Iron

Very good, thanks.

 

Iron

In many cases a MCU doesn;t use external memory -- like if you have a low-power wireless network, the MCU powers up running th eprohram in its-on-chip Flash memory -- this sort of MCU is also found in microwave ovens, toasters, washing machines, dish washers, and so forth

Blogger

THANKS INTERESTING LIKED THE VOTILE MEMORY THANKS AGAIN MAX

Iron

Bye, Max..See you tomorrow it's 3pm EDT

@vlad, I did some work in the past with VLF 20-200Hz. The trick was to reject all in-band interference such as power line 60, 120, 180 hz. motion of the detector also induced low frequency signals, so a low frwquency negative feedback to restore the base line of the signal is also neeed.

Iron

vlad - ever consider modulating the signal to be able to identify it?

 

@VLAD....better insulation?

Iron

MCU stands for microcontroller unit -- this is essentially a microprocessor coupled with outher stuff like on-chip Flash memory, on-chip SRAM, counter timers, DMA, communications interfaces like UARTS, a few analog inputs feeding into A-to-D converters -- all mounted on the same die and presented in a single package

Blogger

how to track the low frequency signal(15 to 30 Hz) from beneath the ground surface accurately?


We use pig transmitters that emit low frequency signals and a receiver is supposed to accurately track that signal but our receiver catches any undesired low frequency signal which is not necessarily the one from the transmitter. What is the ideal way to get rid of this problem?

Iron

how to distinguish 15 to 30 hz signal from underground transmitter with other 15 to 30 Hz undesired signals not necessarily from the same transmitter?

Iron

Thanks again Max and Rich. I'm definitely interested in the course on how computers do math and designing a chip would be cool.

Iron

MPU stands for microprocessor. Generally speaking this will be a central processing unit (CPU) with a few additional functional blocks like on-chip mcache memory, a floating point co-processor, and so forth...

Blogger

how about the optocouples IC constructions?

Iron

I was alway wonder how they can fit everything in the black casing.

Iron

Thank you Max, enjoyed this very much, looking forward to tomorrow. Enjoyed several RHCP videos last night.

Iron

Thanks and nice use of the periodic chart!  

Iron

Could you further describe which types of IC are used on common devices: cell phones, PC motherboards, iPads, inkjet printers, etc.?

Iron

how to distinguish 15 to 30 hz signal from underground transmitter with other 15 to 30 Hz undesired signals?

Iron

thanks, Max!   later slides were Amazingly Interesting!  especially silicon interposer - looks like a teeny-tiny 2-sided circuit board (vias and all...) made of silicon and stuck into the IC.    what's old is new again....   :)

how about the optocouples IC constructions?

Iron

Thanks Max.  Brilliant.

Iron

What is the performance affected when using the SiP 2D / 3D packages?

Iron

How does one know what oscilloscope bandwidth is required for a design?  e.g. if MCU is 100MHz, what bandwidth of oscope is required?  Is that the right question to ask?

Iron

Very informative lecture.  I have to go back and review yesterday's session, as I missed it.  I am looking forward to the rest of the week, though.

 

OK -- difference between a MCU and a MPU...

Blogger

I would like a better understanding of how memory is "physically" stored...if that makes sense.

Iron

Thanks Max and Rich, interesting and entertaining as always. See all tomorrow.

Iron

@"It's easy to be the best, when it is likely the only bagpipe joke I hear today."

 

Well, there you are then (grin)

Blogger

Thanks Max. Missed the jokes so will have to listen to them later. :(

Thanks again Max!  Great presentation!

Iron

how to distinguish 15 to 30 hz signal from underground transmitter with other 15 to 30 Hz undesired signals?

Iron

Thanks  from Bulgaria too, Max!

Iron

how to distinguish 15 to 30 hz signal from underground transmitter with other 15 to 30 Hz undesired signals?

Iron

Thank you very much, Max

Iron

Difference between MPU & MCU

Iron

What's the difference between MPU & MCU?

Iron

how to distinguish 15 to 30 hz signal from underground transmitter with other 15 to 30 Hz undesired signals? 

Iron

MPU - MicroProcessor Unit

MCU - MicroController unit (usually has memory and flash on board)

Excelllent job Max, Thank you

Iron

My absolute pleasure -- so any question?

Blogger

Very good presentation!

Thanks

Iron

Another excellent session. Thanks!

Thanks, Max!  Looking forward to tomorrow's session.

Iron

great information, thanks Max

Iron

Thnaks Max....very interesting indeed!

It's easy to be the best, when it is likely the only bagpipe joke I hear today.

Iron

Really informative. Thanks Max!

Iron

enjoyed the review thanks.

Iron

Another excellent presenation today Max.  Thanks.

Iron

you have to appreciate British humor

Iron

thanks very much, Max. Very informative

Very good information, Max.  Thank you so much!

Iron

thanks lots of good info

Thanks Max, Rich and Digikey

 

Iron

Another great presentation from Mr. Magnificient!

Iron

Thanks for a great session Max!

Iron

Max, thank you for today's lecture

Iron

Thankyou for taking the time to do this again you are great Max

Iron

Good info.  Thanks Max.

Iron

Monolithic 3D IC technologies
http://www.programmableplanet.com/author.asp?section_id=1925&doc_id=247805

Blogger

Good information and perspective.

Iron

Thank you  Max, I have to leave now

Iron

what is the difference between MPU and MCU

Iron

Max,

Are ceramic caps embedded into your example of slide 29?

 

Iron

The chips that got hot were the 64k memory chips circa 1980,  had to pretest all of the chips to weed out the slow ones and then try to match compatable parts to even get it to work.  Life is alot easier now thought maybe more confusing but can't wait to see what comes next.

Iron

Very cool information, great presentation.  Thanks Max!

Iron

very interesting. thanks, max

Iron

Thx Max, I have to leave now. It's a great PT, See you tomorrow.

Iron

Finally got my "Streaming" issues resolved.

 

Iron

wow...great intro on chips and especially 3D technology

Iron

Flas=h: You have version 11,3,300,265 installed

Firefox 13.02

Audio OK.

 

Iron

I have some bubble memory for my Fluke 1752A.  It got warm but never hot.

Iron

Refreshed and all is well.  First time this happened.

Suspect it is my home wireless supplier

Iron

I just checked my firewalls and it's allowed on both the router and computer.

Iron

Your right  bubble memory was to slow, early serial system, interesting but not very practical.  Worked on a solid state 1 meg disk on 14 x 18 and caught on fire reguarly.

Iron

Mine just dropped totally off-line

Iron

Max, I have to leave for a Dr. Lab appointment.  I will catch the end of the presentation when I get back.  Great presentation. You have filled in a lot of holes in my knowledge.  Thanks

Iron

@Jawanda - share with us how you recovered audio

Iron

I'm still waiting for when you will have a shipping version of holographic (3d) memory where you can store exabytes or more in a space less then a single DIMM today 

KentJ - Do you have problems listening to the archived session too?

Iron

Silver is still used for lead frame plating!  Particularly for fine wire Al wire bonds

Iron

@caa028, gold is used in the packaging but not in the IC itself, I believe

 

Platinum

Bubble memory was too slow.  Replaced by flash.

Iron

The new tearm they are throwing around in mobile development is kibi and mibi to avoid the confusion

 

no silver, it migrates

 

Iron

KentJ:


You may have to disable your firewall ofr a quick test. You might also have ot blocked at your router firewall -- assuming you have one.

If it works after disabling the FW -- then you can figure out the ports and add it/them.

Iron

@richnass   That would be the element Bs, number 118 I believe...   :)

Gold is used to assemble the package [wire bonds, plating, etc], but is very bad in the Si lattice itself.  Is a recombination center.

Iron

What happened to bubble memory.....

Iron

don't forget "kibbe" = 1024 & "mibbe" = 1,048,576

Iron

Blue was second most common group of five.

Iron

No gold and silver in ICs?

Iron

what was the blue on slide 18?  minimal trace?

Iron

Being totally disabled, I work from home so that won't work.

Iron

No only managers and salesmen

Iron

no Au - what about my gold fillings

 

Am I the only one who was waiting for a "we're filled with hot air" joke?

Blogger

here in bulgaria(europe) audio is ok too.

Iron

@Kentj: that sounds like your company or ISP is blocking blogtalkradio or some other essential resource needed to bring the audio to you. Consider listening to the archived audio elsewhere (like at home) and see how that works. I can listen at home but the class happens while I am at work and my company blocks the audio so I typically listen on a smart phone.

Iron

@ObeDon - left side of blogtalk player (round button that changes between pause and play)

Iron

jl -- it is not on the slide and PALs were the first PGAs

Iron

Audio worked great in previous weeks.  Just not this week.

Iron

@Kentj - "blogtalkradio.com" blocked by proxy or some script blocker?

Iron

wow...$10m...need to get this number down somehow

Iron

CAA028 where is the play?

Iron

No audio at all.  I don't even have the area at the top of the page Where "Blog Talk Radio" would go.  I even reloaded the up to date Flash Player.

Iron

@npitech - what do you mean by "not listed"

Iron

Great audio, no dropout

Iron

had a brief audio break - hit pause and then play... everything recovered

Iron

@richnass: I do have a similar audio problem but on a much smaller and less annoying scale than justheretolearn does. I am listening on a smart phone so I assume that local congestion or temporary signal loss as I move around accounts for the occasional drops.

Iron

RichQ -- I know what it is, it is not listed. Thanks!

 

Iron

whenever I have had the continueous rebuffereing in the past, had to restart brower...not having this issue now, everything is OK

Iron

Only had audio drop out momentarily once.  I didn't have to do anything

Iron

loud and clear; no breaks

Iron

@npitech - PAL = programmable array logic

Platinum

justheretolearn: I'm guessing that the problem is at your end. Seems to be okay for me. Anyone else having similar issue?

Blogger

My audio goes into buffering a dozen times or more during the class, the only way to get it back is refresh many times. ???

Slide 12 should also include other devices like UARTs. etc. How about just "logic" as another box?

Platinum

SOC + FPGA = PSoC

 

Iron

Via and Blind Via -- go to the http://www.element14.com/community/index.jspa (Element 14 web site) get a copy of Eagle -- watch the tutorial and get all that stuff explained. It's a hangout for high end hobbyists and wannabe engineers like me.

Iron

I thought it already was taking days!

Iron

Yeah take as long as needed it is always a good talk.

Iron

thanks Rich...yes, keep it coming

Iron

Yes, please take your time.  Very cool information

Iron

Is there a blending of SOC and FPGA chips?

 

Iron

Slide 12 - add logic gates, AND, NAND, NOR, flip-flops, etc. They still exist.

Iron

@BTucker06:  Could you define VIA or Blind VIA

A via is a hole through a printed wiring board (PWB) that electrically connects the top layer to the bottom layer.  A blind via is one that connects two internal layers of a PWB.

Iron

Don't have any Audio Problem.

Iron

yes the audio dropped for a moment but came right back, all is OK now

Iron

Just had the audio drop out for a moment as well

Iron

DaveWR - it comes out looking like a lumpy cylinder.  Forget how many lumps, but U are right - less stress points, and it certainly makes it easier to handle a round wafer.  Lumpy, irregular wafers don't work too well in automated equipment

Iron

Might add MMIC to slide 11

Iron

use your web browser (assuming you have a smartphone)

Iron

Max,

Could you define VIA or Blind VIA

Iron

@marcioSysc, shaving or grinding the top of a plastic package should not cause any problems.

Iron

What is the number?

Iron

Why are the crystals round? (Cylindrical?) WHy not?

A geologist might say that rocks with corners are "high energy" subject to the corners breaking off and cracking. I suspect it's the same issue -- also a way of making a low stress chip. AIrliners have round windows to reduce stress... Just guessin' but maybe it's the answer.

Iron

if I shave the identification of the IC may affect its operation?

Iron

Joined late, can't get tot he audio - any suggestions?

Iron

@justheretolearn - I have lost audio in the past by navigating off this page by clicking other links, etc.

Iron

Question, why do I have to keep refreshing to keep audio going. I have updated Flash restarted computer.

sorry, only one E, EPROM is the windows part :-)

Iron

a good way to see these simple ICs is to look at a windowed chip, like a pic or EEPROM

Iron

what about the optocouples?

Iron

Max should add a slide around #3 or #4 to explain the size differences in nanometers, etc.

Iron

Had an early radio boasting seven transistors. Turned out that four were used as diodes.

Platinum

which slide are we at now?

Iron

I saw a good quality step and repeat machine. i was built on a big hunk of granite and had its oun temperature control unit to prevent temperature changes from causing problems

hello everyone.

Sorry.. a little late.

Iron

The boule isn't perfectly cylindrical.  It is ground to a cylindircal shape after drawing.

Iron

Waffers are cut from grown crystal silicon.

 

Iron

Still no audio after all that.

Iron

First home project was VTVM (Vacumn Tube Volt Meter - still have it :)

First job was post IC era.

(Hi from Portlandia)

Why Cylinders? Is it a chemical aspect of Silicon?

i read once that we make more transistors than all printed letters (including copies).  Think about the complexity of a transitor and a letter printed on the page.

Blogger

I still have my RCA tube manual and TI hard bound TTL manual

Iron

Hello, First time, First job I work with RTL - DTL

Iron

The first transistor I had or used was a Raytheon germanium PNP, the CK722, in a beautiful blue case, that I purchased for $0.99. I still have it and it was still functional the last time I checked (but that was many years ago now).

Iron

I remember working with TV transmitter tubes... about 6 feet tall.

Iron

Since I started my careers always have used ICs.

Iron

@chsweden - try refreshing your browser...if that doesn't work, try restarting your browser

Iron

I made a tube radio from Radio Shack as a young boy.  It was exciting when transistor radios came out.

 

Iron

If you experience technical problems, send an email to support@designnews.com

Blogger

Sci. Fi becomes science fact.

 

Iron

A TV in each room is easy when you live in a tent

Iron

I worked with tubes, transistors and ITs  Saw analog computers on subs in the 60's.  The first time I saw a transistor it was 1950 at the Sithsonian Institute.  Also saw Eniac there later.

jrm

 

Iron

Remeber the 50's? A miniture six transistor superhet AM Radio was IT!

Iron

Can't hear anything.  Has webinar started?

CZ

Iron

Sounds like a cat, lol.

 

Iron

LOL @ Jawanda I wasn't alive before ICs either!  @ ObeDon from Ann Arbor here. 

Iron

Like the bagpipe joke, "Far Side" always looses something when you have to describe it.

Iron

certainly will get you noticed.

 

Iron

@Max - lol - keep them coming

Iron

bag pipes = bag full of cats

Iron

Don't quit your day job

 

Iron

I still have a Staedler Mars slide rule, some vac tubes and a box full of 2N2222 transistors -- guilty as charged. But I did originally work on VLSI when I started my career... (Probably before Max. ;-) )

Iron

I had a chuckle at the bagpipes.

Iron

Started during the transition to ICs.  Very little transistor experience.

 

Iron

yes, funny, tell one tomorrow

 

Iron

dry british humour is always apropos

Iron

it was funny Max the Magnficient!

Iron

@Max: Joke was funny. Love bagpipe jokes.

Iron

@Kentj - audion as started - try refreshing your browser

Iron

I do remember before ICs, but only fiddled with stuff then - mostly taking things apart (putting them together being a bit more difficult...   :)

I remember black & white TVs, life without air conditioners, one-car families, actually walking to school...

I started off in vacuum tube design -- characteristic curves were much better than those of transistors.

Iron

I was exposed to IC's when in High School.  This is the same time I became interested in electronics and logic circuits.

Iron

Yes, lots of standoffs, wire and many transistors and tubes as heaters on a cold day.

Iron

My first transistor was an International Rectifier CK722

Iron

Yes. Tubes added light and heat and individual components were large enough to see, replace, and measure.

Iron

tubes and individual transistors

 

Iron

No audio or even the portion of screen saying audio is buffering this week.

Iron

Some fun, eval, and surprisingly learning some new stuff...

Ex-designer of math processor and comm and protocol processors.

Iron

My first class on radio was all about tubes in 1962.

 

@rich - life before IC's - yes began on punch cards and the Basic 360 following the 1440 (? or something)

Iron

Of course, life before ICs. Very exciting to get your own transistor radio, which could almost fit in your pocket!

Iron

Old tv and radios.

Iron

Refresher course.  I remember using a slide rule. 

Iron

Before IC's???  I'm not THAT old!

What was that?

Refresh

Iron

I like the tubes too. They still really a good stuff.

Iron

I don't really have much memory of life before IC's-I'm 48.

Iron

life before ICs for me was a caddy full of tubes. troubleshooting was feeling which ones were lit or hot.

Iron

Remember before transistors, heat and high voltage.

Iron

Life before ICs was dark and simple.

No, I started looking at IC electronics as a child

Iron

Of course I remember... 2N2222

Iron

Rich - I'd like to suggest the slides be available in PDF as well as PPT

I remember vacuum tubes burned my fingers... I'm so happy they're gone.  :)

I can still tell you what's on what pin of a 12AX7

Iron

I wasn't alive before IC's

Iron

@Rich - tubes are (were) fun

Iron

Greetings from West Texas

 

Iron

Audio is loud and clear.

Iron

Hello from Ogden, Utah

Iron

Max has been excellent!

 

Hello from Needham, MA  (near Boston, Cape Cod, hub of the universe, etc, etc...   :)

Hello Every body,  Bright nad hot  day  in El Salvador

Iron

They have the Internet in NW Minnesota? (grin)

Blogger

Good afternoon folks.

Iron

Hello from RTP, NC.  U.S. EPA

Iron

Greetings from NW Minnesota

Iron

Hi, I have the slide set; hw do I get audio?

 

Iron

Hello from Puerto Rico

Iron

Hello to everyone from Ontario, Canada

Iron

Max: You might want to mention when 4th Generation computers (VLSI chips) came into being -- and what generation we are on now.

Just don't miss that for the entertainment of your guests...

Iron

Good morning from San Jose

Iron

Hello! from Britsh Columbia

Iron

@DaveWR: "You do know that stuff, right, Max?"

I'm admitting nothing :-)

 

Blogger

It'll be worth it

 

Iron

Greetings from sunny Melbourne, FL

Iron

Hello from Norfolk, VA

Iron

SF here... I'm going to be late to a Giants game for this... better be worth it!

hello Max and Rich - glad to be here today...looking forward to another great presentation

Iron

@GaryE -- it wasn't .... I said "does anyone have any questions" .... am I sorry now :-)

Blogger

Hello from San Diego

Iron

You do know that stuff, right, Max? (grin)

Maybe wavelets instead... ;-)

Iron

Hi from Dayton Ohio

 

Iron

Good Afternoon Max.

Iron

Not as well as I should (shudder)

Iron

Muskegon, MI - by the lake....

Iron

You do know that stuff, right, Max? (grin)

Looks like I missed something important. When was Fourier covered?

Iron

@smqasim - contact me directly on how I have download and saved the audio files to these presentations at jl@jlbsystems.net

Iron

Are bagpipe jokes too much to ask?

Iron

@jjrochow: "Max did not address the relationship between the sampling rate, the number of bits per sample and the coeffients of the Fourier series for the waveform one is converting from analog to digital."

 

"Is that too much to ask in this series?"

 

Yes (grin)

Blogger

Hello From San Jose, CA

Iron

Hello from Tucson

 

Iron

Hello to All from Mesquite NV

Iron

Richnass: If it is too technical for this series, you do not have to address it.

Good afternoon from Birmingham, AL!

Iron

Hello from Brookline, Ma

 

Iron

Hello all from overcast Edmonton, AB

Iron

Hello from Sunny Lake Simco in Ontario Canada.

Max: You might want to mention when 4th Generation computers (VLSI chips) came into being -- and what generation we are on now.

Iron

Hi from Dom in NJ to all!

Iron

Hello also from Texas

Iron

richnass: thank you.

Iron

smqasim: the audio is available via this site, but is not downloadable. Only streamable

Blogger

Jawanda: Yes, you do

Blogger

jjrochow: I will address that with Max at the beginning of the class

Blogger

How can we downlaod the audio recordings of these lectures ?

Iron

Do we recieve a credit for this series?

Iron

Max did not address the relationship between the sampling rate, the number of bits per sample and the coeffients of the Fourier series for the waveform one is converting from analog to digital.

Is that too much to ask in this series?

 

Be sure to download the slide deck from the link above.

Blogger

Are you ready for Day 3? If it's anythiung like Days 1 and 2, we're in for a treat.

Blogger


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