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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Hollywood inspirations
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2012 12:03:50 PM
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Beth, I had the same impression about BEAR: haven't I seen this in a movie someplace? I'd bet the Hollywood producers and writers of those movies have done their homework and were inspired at least partly by some of these real robots. The other part I'd guess comes straight from the pages of science fiction novels, graphic novels and comic books.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: surveillance but not resuce
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2012 12:03:04 PM
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Most of these search and rescue/first responder robots are designed to get into tight spaces and navigate dangerous territory, while also providing reconnaissance about dangerous conditions and/or locating or helping victims. For example, Survivor Buddy, Gemini-Scout, the aptly named FirstLook, Georgia Tech's tiny MAST robots, Surveyor SRV-1, and Hector GV. The larger DARPA bots are aimed at clearing a path for first responders and/or helping victims. I suspect they'd also be useful for archeological exploration: some of the surveillance-type robots in the nautical robots slideshow

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=246206 

are targeted at apps like underwater archeology.

NadineJ
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Platinum
surveillance but not resuce
NadineJ   7/23/2012 11:11:49 AM
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Most of the robots featured are suited for surveillance, which can lead to rescue, but don't address the most hazardous issues in search and rescue. Getting through tight spots or in collapsed buildings prevent human rescuers from reaching victims quickly.

I'd love to see if the robots featured here can help archeologists.

Beth Stackpole
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Hollywood inspirations
Beth Stackpole   7/23/2012 9:00:31 AM
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Bear is really cool and could do wonders for saving lives. That robot and some of the others look like they are straight from a Hollywood action flick. I think with the robots that actually interact with victims, incorporating as much humanoid technology as possible is probably a plus.

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