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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Efficient gas engines
Rob Spiegel   7/26/2012 2:24:43 PM
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I hope you get somewhere with this, ChasChas. It would be good to see an internal combustion engine that takes a real step forward beyond the back and forth pistons.

ChasChas
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Platinum
Re: Efficient gas engines
ChasChas   7/25/2012 6:48:15 PM
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I am still working on the legal protection so it can be presented properly. I have only shown it under confidential disclosure.

It has a mechanism where the actual movement of the pistions, and cylinders are perfectly balanced circles, but the relative motion between them is linear and conventional.  No, it is not anything like a Le Rhône.  Real sweet!

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Efficient gas engines
Rob Spiegel   7/25/2012 6:29:05 PM
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ChasChas, could you tell us a little about your concept? Is it a rotary engine with the bugs worked out?

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Efficient gas engines
ChasChas   7/24/2012 3:30:21 PM
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True, the concepts haven't been strong enough. Now, when I'm sure I have a strong concept, the interest and money has dried up. I'll keep looking for money though. Maybe this post can find a few with money who still beleive.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Efficient gas engines
Rob Spiegel   7/24/2012 2:17:50 PM
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If I remember right, Chuck, theat pretty much ended the concept of the rotary engine. As for the inefficiency of the piston engine, I wouldn't think that the non-productive return movement of the piston consumers significant energy.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Efficient gas engines
Rob Spiegel   7/24/2012 2:13:08 PM
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Yes it does seem like we gave up, ChasChas. That's why I'm wondering whether the troubles were because of a weak concept or a weak execution. And is there an alternative to the rotary engine and the piston engine?

Charles Murray
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Re: Efficient gas engines
Charles Murray   7/23/2012 9:10:37 PM
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I'm no expert on the Wankel, Rob, so I'll take Mirox's word for it that the apex seal problm was solved long ago. I do remember hearing stories in the old days about Mazdas getting their engines rebuilt every 50,000 miles because of the apex seals. I'm sure Mirox is right, though: That was a long time ago.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Efficient gas engines
ChasChas   7/23/2012 5:47:27 PM
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Well, the literature says we are still wasting 35% of our gas moving the pistons back and forth (normal driving). True rotary engine research sure seems like a must do to me. Like the long range battery, we gotta have it. And it seems like we gave up.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Dogma?
Rob Spiegel   7/23/2012 4:58:44 PM
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Yes, in business, there are great rewards for successful competition. It brings out some extraordinary effort. I'm not sure it always brings out the best -- sometimes noncompetitive research brings out the best -- but it does spur effort, and that often produces extraordinary results. The moon landing was the result of competition.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Efficient gas engines
Rob Spiegel   7/23/2012 4:48:53 PM
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If the rotary engine is not being developed in a substantial manner, by vehicle manufacturers, does that mean the traditional piston engine is plenty efficient enough?

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