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Beth Stackpole
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Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Beth Stackpole   7/12/2012 8:24:08 AM
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Objet has really done a great job pushing a variety of materials for their 3D printers, thus upping the utility of how they can be used. My question is what exactly makes a material "digital"? I get the ability to mix and tune the properties so that they can mimic more traditional materials. But how is that done in a digital fashion? Is there some sort of software algorithm that handles the finetuned mixing or is it a property in the material itself?

TJ McDermott
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
TJ McDermott   7/12/2012 10:09:05 AM
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Beth, that is an interesting statement, isn't it?  "A digital material".  That's going to cause me to look at everything I see today and ask "Is that digital?"

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Ann R. Thryft   7/12/2012 12:21:46 PM
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"Digital materials" is Objet's term. As Bradshaw is quoted as saying, they are combined digitally, meaning via computer--preprogrammed--during printing, versus making parts of a prototype separately, and mechanically combining them after printing. The point is that engineers can program the printer to print different material property combinations in different parts of the model, as Objet describes on the page at the link we gave in the article.

NadineJ
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
NadineJ   7/12/2012 12:46:56 PM
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It sounds like the digital materials give more visual options for designers/engineers (and sales teams) to see the model as accurately as possible for actual materials are applied.

Nice progression, especially for the accessories market.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Ann R. Thryft   7/12/2012 12:53:09 PM
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Thanks, Nadine. Actually, it's more than visual resemblance: with different material properties in different parts of the model that more closely resemble the product, the model does a better job of simulating form, fit and especially function.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Rob Spiegel   7/12/2012 4:02:14 PM
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The video says a lot, Ann. This seems like a logical step in the development of 3D printing, that companies would begin to compete on the availability of materials.

NadineJ
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
NadineJ   7/12/2012 4:09:44 PM
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@Ann-Form and fit are visual.  How can digital materials in a 3D mock up simulate function?

Maybe I'm old fashioned but testing a sample made with a material that simulates rubber is no match for a test on a sample made with the actual rubber that will be used in production.

Does the simulated function just give an estimate of performance in order to speed up the development process?

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Beth Stackpole   7/13/2012 9:29:56 AM
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I'm not sure these 3D printed prototypes, digital materials or not, are meant to be a full-on replacement for building a real working prototype with real materials. I think they are meant to be part of the process and help eliminate the need for building so many different variations of physical working prototypes, which can be costly and time consuming. These methods are far more efficient and less expensive compared with building expensive tooling.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Ann R. Thryft   7/13/2012 11:51:53 AM
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There seems to be some semantic confusion. Form and fit are more than visual--if a part fits with another part, that's not visual, that's mechanical. To do so, it must be the right form. Functionality of a part is only visual if the part's looks have something to do with its function. It's not the materials that simulate anything, it's the part made with those materials, which with 3D technology can be a lot more than a mockup.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Materials mix key to 3D printer adoption
Ann R. Thryft   7/13/2012 11:52:48 AM
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Beth, thanks for that succinct explanation. A production sample/working prototype made with actual materials would be the best test, but that's not always possible, due to the cost of tooling alone, not to mention the high cost of small, non-production amounts of materials, for example, or the time involved. Which is why the 3D prototype/model industry got started: saving time and money and getting a lot closer to an understanding of the end-product.

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