HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/3  >  >>
bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
SALT SHAKER
bobjengr   7/13/2012 5:47:14 PM
NO RATINGS
The thing that bothers me is that I'm getting use to products that don't work or don't work properly.   It appears that some companies basically skip the field test or consumer focus groups that find errors in engineering and / or manufacturing.      Would we be so forgiving if the end product was an MRI or an aircraft engine?  If the resulting error created false readings or dangerous conditions would we not be more rigorous in our efforts to provide the best product available?   I know salt shakers are cheap but it seems solutions are available at the manufacturing level.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Salt shaking
warren@fourward.com   7/10/2012 7:39:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I think we may be too used to having every cheap thing be perfect.  But it is good to read this article to make sure we look at these lids, which every house uses by the hundreds, and make sure ours are "perfect."  Now I can make them perfect.  Thanks for the tip!

The worse case for me is when it was either specified too large, or the mold was too large, or the plastic shrunk and the lid doesn't tighten but spins.  I don't think I ever had one too small, however.

Gregarious2
User Rank
Iron
Salt shaking
Gregarious2   7/10/2012 3:48:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Here in Hawai'i, a non hermetically sealed container of salt becomes a damp container of salt water in a few days. I've tried various sealed containers, ( snap lids with o rings, etc... ) but keeping the salt in the refrigerator works fine.  Keeping lidded salt containers on the table is just a fantasy.

 

For a real laugh, check out the Trudeau syrup dispenser. My business partner purchased this lidded pitcher with eight separate, dishwasher friendly plastic parts, including a threaded base assembly with o-ring. It never quite goes together well enough to not leak and never quite re-assembles well enough to be useful.  After cleaning the refrigerator shelf a few times, I threw it out and use a simple, leakproof pitcher whose design hasn't changed much in the past 3000 years. I'm sure someone got a nice design award but they should be made to use it a few times.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Moral of the story
Ann R. Thryft   7/10/2012 2:29:39 PM
NO RATINGS
Low-sodium foods are higher in calories to balance the removal of salt so consumers will experience the prepared food as tasting equally yummy. The levels of salt in prepared foods are quite high, or at least used to be, so there's a lot of "yummy" to make up for.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: salt shaker tangent
OLD_CURMUDGEON   7/9/2012 9:28:18 AM
NO RATINGS
The problem COULD have been solved very early in the design/build process IF the tool designers specified a D-M-E RUNNERLESS moldbase w/ proven cavity probes!

 

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: salt shaker tangent
GlennA   7/9/2012 9:12:48 AM
NO RATINGS
Larry M;  It makes sense that the rice would eventually need to be either replaced or 'refreshed'.  The process could be to completely empty the salt shaker and refill it with a fresh salt / rice mixture.  Then the 'stale' salt / rice mixture could either be discarded or baked to refresh the rice.  It could become very complicated for something as cheap as salt.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Container challenges
William K.   7/7/2012 6:18:14 PM
NO RATINGS
It is certainly true that a hot wire would be the best method for cleaning off mold flash in a production environment, in fact it could probably be an automated process. But I very seldom have a hot wire in my pocket, in fact, I carefully avoid having hot wires in my pocket. But a good sharp pocket knife is useful in many situations, and is a very handy tool. Of course, there are indeed a lot of folks who should never handle any tool sharper than a tennis ball. So it would indeed not be the best tool for everybody.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: salt shaker tangent
Larry M   7/7/2012 2:06:52 PM
NO RATINGS
GlennA wrote: "So eventually, the salt shakers were full of rice, with a few grains of salt in between.  Apparently, no one realised that only the salt needed to be replaced."

Nope, Glenn, that's not right. The rice absorbs only a finite amount of water and needs to be replaced periodically (or baked in an oven at, say, 180, for several minutes to drive off the water). The error was not in refilling the shakers with salt/rice mixture, but in failing to pour out the old rice first.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Container challenges
Larry M   7/7/2012 2:00:51 PM
NO RATINGS
William K. wrote "It should not take more than a few seconds with a sharp knife to trim the runner remains so that they never catch in the threads,..."

Actually it's much more common in production to use a hot wire. The heated wire segment is stationary on the bench and the operator just passes the objects to be trimmed across it. This is safer than a knife for at least two reasons:
  1. The wire is stationary. You don't have two hands working against one another with potential to slip.
  2. The wire can have guards wide enough to pass the object to be trimmed but narrow enough to block fingers.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Poorly designed container
Rob Spiegel   7/6/2012 6:58:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Now there's a bloody story, Chuck. I was given a winter coat as a gift. It was too big. I took it back with the receipt and they wouldn't take it back because it had picked up some dog hair from my back seat. I took it outside, brushed it off and took it to another clerk who accepted it.

Page 1/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Factory floor engineers may soon be able to operate machinery and monitor equipment status simply by tapping their eyeglasses.
GE Aviation not only plans to use 3D printing to mass-produce metal parts for its LEAP jet engine, but it's also developing a separate technology for 3D-printing metal parts used in its other engines.
In this TED presentation, Wayne Cotter, a computer engineer turned standup comic, explains why engineers are natural comedians.
IBM's new SyNAPSE chip makes it possible for computers to both memorize and compute simultaneously.
The “Space Kid,” 11, will be one of the first civilians to have his design manufactured in space by NASA, thanks to the City X Project, which inspires kids to think about new 3D-printed inventions that could be useful for humans living in space.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service