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lsdjfo39293
User Rank
Iron
printing companies
lsdjfo39293   5/30/2014 3:58:38 PM
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Finding a great printer in Canada sometime is quite difficult. You want the best price and service out there. Here are some of my suggestion: Canada Printer | Toronto Print Quote | Calgary Print Quote | Winnipeg Print Quote | Montreal Print Quote | Regina Print Quote | Saskatoon Print Quote | Quebec Print Quote | Ottawa Print Quote | Edmonton Print Quote | Vancouver Print Quote |

If you want to find sticker printing companies which could do die cut, circle, and other types of stickers. Here are some of my best recommendation: custom sticker print quote | Print Custom Stickers | Sticker printing company. They provided the best quality and price out there.

If you are a print broker. You need to have a fast turnaround and most importantly, lowest print price on the market. Here is my list: Best Print Trader | Lowest Price Printing Wholesale | Print Outsourcing | Print Broker Trade

For some other alternatives for great printers. Here it is: Custom Printing Services | Print Companies | Best Printing Company

Some of the US printer list are here: Atlanta Printer Quote | Boston Print Quote | Chicago Print Quote | Arizona Print Quote | Miami Print Quote | New York Print Quote

If you are a printer yourself, you might need this. Best printer management software: Print Company Software | print software tool | manage print shop software

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Who's enforces the standards?
Ann R. Thryft   7/17/2012 1:18:43 PM
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So it sounds like OSHA no longer does regular inspections looking for unsafe practices, in other words, proactive instead of reactive inspection. I wonder what happened to the funding for proactive inspection.

 Fred Engineer
User Rank
Bronze
Re: Who's enforces the standards?
Fred Engineer   7/13/2012 1:28:02 PM
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Ann, OSHA is the safety regulator in the US.  I don't think OSHA has the resources to do many inspections.  When a company has a serious accident, then they look closely and levy fines, etc.  Companies are also required to report all work related injuries and illnesses, hence the term "OSHA Reportable".  There are guidelines for what types of injuries are reported.  There are also specific metrics that companies are required to report:

Total recordable cases of injuries and illnesses
Injury and illness cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction
Injury and illness cases with days away from work
Injury and illness cases with days of job transfer or restriction
Other recordable injury and illness cases
Total injury cases

The metrics are normalized to the rate per 200,000 hours worked.  These metrics are compared with other companies in the same industry.  If your company stands out from the others, it is likely you will be visited by OSHA.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Who's enforces the standards?
Ann R. Thryft   7/13/2012 11:56:57 AM
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I thought OSHA was the main safety enforcement body in the US. When I worked at manufacturing companies in the 80s, that's who everyone worried about pleasing, especially during their very infrequent inspections. That infrequency continues to be a problem: how can they enforce safety standards without frequent enough monitoring?

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Safety Standards
apresher   7/11/2012 5:48:14 PM
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Rob,  Responsibility for safety is a complicated issue (especially if liability is a question) but certainly everyone shares in it.  Companies deploying machines have to meet regulatory requirements (such as OSHA) and I'm sure both machine builders and automation vendors are responsible for certifying machines and components.  Not sure exactly how enforcement works, but I'm sure it depends on locations and rules around the world.  Big challenge for machine builders.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Safety
Nancy Golden   7/11/2012 10:23:24 AM
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And unfortunately Dave, that mindset is often consumer driven as companies try to compete in a market place where buying decisions are made by cost rather than the ultimate quality of the product...

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Safety
Dave Palmer   7/11/2012 12:26:08 AM
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@Nancy Golden: Your friend is right.  Chinese products have a reputation for poor quality largely because, when U.S. companies go to China, they're looking for the cheapest parts they can find.  Of course, the cheapest parts you can find are usually not the best; that's true in any country, including the U.S.  You get what you pay for.  There are some world-class, high-quality manufacturers in China, but all too often, U.S. and other Western companies would prefer to do business with the bottom-of-the-barrel suppliers.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Safety
Nancy Golden   7/11/2012 12:07:13 AM
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I have a friend who works for a company that does a lot of business with companies in China, Tim. He has always said that you can get anything manufactured in China at the highest level of quality or complexity that you desire - as long as you are willing to pay for it. I am sure they would recognize those safety standards if their buyers made it a criteria and were willing to pay for it...and if it evolved into a global standard that was enforced then they would just about have to or wouldn't have any business.

 Fred Engineer
User Rank
Bronze
Re: Who's enforces the standards?
Fred Engineer   7/2/2012 3:09:47 PM
NO RATINGS
In the US, enforcement is always a problem.  Buyers and end users have to be careful what they buy.

Another thing to keep in mind is that EN13849 is a European standard.  The Europeans have a whole collection of pretty well thought out standards covering machine safety.  Only problem is they don't meet US requirements.  OSHA expects us to follow 29CFR1910.xx.
OSHA also recognizes ANSI standards.  In machine safety, that means NFPA 79 and the ANSI B11 series.

Another modern standard that is being harmonized with the European standards is ANSI/ISA 84 which grew out of the process control industry.  It was developed to avoid another Bhopal disaster.  ANSI/ISA 84 uses the concept of Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) which are assigned based upon a risk and hazard analysis process.  It's interesting that the new automotive safety standard ISO26262 has the concept of Automotive SIL.  The levels are A-D rather than 1-4, but the concept is the same.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Safety
Tim   6/29/2012 6:49:49 PM
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Great article and description of the safety standards that are out there for designing. I wonder if China would recognize these standards on equipment made there and shipped here.

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