HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Comments
You must login to participate in this chat. Please login.

Thanks Mark, and thanks listeners for your time and questions.

Blogger

Career path... by the way, SE is about leadership as well.  So leadership experience is critical.

Iron

Career path... current theory is to get an engineering degree, get some experience, and get a Masters (to get a degree) althrough there are plenty of experienced SE's out there without advanced degrees

 

Iron

Problem resurface...that makes sense since the product cycle times are about that.  So why does that happen?  the knowledge/experience is in the engineers heads rather than being in a repository, so the experience leaves the program and who ever is left behind is wondering why we did something, takes it out, and the problem comes back.

Iron

That raises an interesting question. What is the best training path (i.e., college, first job, career path, etc.) for a systems engineer?

Blogger

Problem resurface... problems come back depending on the typical product cycle.  Auto people tell me it's 3 years.  High tech people tell me it 6 months.

 

Iron

RMSS balance question... the problem is they need to start somewhere to gain that experience.  There is a raging debate whether you can college educate a SE. i.e. a BS in SE.   You will see relatively few of them, but you will see a number of MS and PHD's on the topic

Iron

RMSS balance question... if you look around your organization, there is someone(s) who seems to have a grasp of cross-discipline issues.  Usually they have a line outside their cube of people waiting to ask questions.  Those are the people that have been around your organization alot of years, who have the experience to know what can get them.  So, a generalist is what you need for SE. 

Iron

My guess is that it doesn't take long for a problem once solved to resurface. Is that management something that happens in the PLM system as part of an integrated or big-picture engineering approach or is that a totally different animal?

Blogger

Common mistakes...  your product failures will point out the breakdown in communications across disciplines.  That's why you need a integrated infrastructure to not only capture them, but also 'remember' them for you.

Iron

Mark, RMRSS asks a good question: What is a good balance betwqeen ones specialty and overall knowledge in a top down design?

Blogger

Like I pointed out mistakes have a way of focusing an organization.  Lessons learned from a mistake should be managed and kept up with like product information.  Otherwise you have a tendancy to repeat the problems.  One organization called it the resurface metric...how long does a problem once solved take to come back

Iron

Great examples, Mark. Now I have to ask--any suggested fixes/workarounds to those common mistakes?

Blogger

@KevinFramm: You can go and listen to the episode at the Design News site; look for the Design News Radio portion and you can get access to this and other radio episodes.

 

Blogger

Mistakes... I've developed a list over time of mistakes organizations make around implementing SE.  For example:

Expecting documents at the end of a development effort instead of models
Promoting fire fighters instead of fire preventors
Not allowing any time up front to do the system/archiecture development
...

 

Iron

I missed it because of unplanned meeting. Any way we can have a transcript or its presentation?

Iron

Mark, any suggestion on best practices around system engineering?

 

Blogger

Drop me a line and I'll hook you up with someone that can help you decide.

Iron

how many people in your organization?

 

Iron

Is your tool expensive, can it be used by small company like ours?

Iron

Absolutely... that's how you get down to a point where the 'box' can be realized.

Iron

It is quite clear, it is good concept in enabling communication

Iron

Black boxes... One of the fundemental tenets of Systems Engineerin is decomposition (i.e. breaking down higher level boxes to lower level boxes).

 

Iron

Mark Beth good points, good talk.  It makes me thing of skynet and the terminator.  My question becomes what is a good balance betwqeen ones specialty and overall knowledge in a top down design?

Iron

What are some of the common mistakes companies make re: taking a systems engineering approach?

Blogger

Higher level thinking... means you get above black boxes to begin with and then come back down.

Iron

Different disciplines talking to each other...  you need to move to a higer level of system description (vs. electical or mechanical)Systems Engineering would say you go to functions first.  That's a implementation independent way of describing what the system should do.

Iron

Thanks for a great presentation Mark and Beth. Looking forward to a lively Q&A chat session here.

Iron

Do you mean we stay at higher level looking at each part as little black boxes?

Iron

How do we get people of diffderent disciplines to understanbd each other?

Iron

It started in name the 1940s at IBM

 

Iron

The streaming audio player will appear on this web page when the show starts at 2pm eastern today. Note however that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser.

Iron

The streaming audio player will appear on this web page when the show starts at 2pm eastern today. Note however that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser.

Iron


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Eric Chesak created a sensor that can detect clouds, and it can also measure different sources of radiation.
Festo's BionicKangaroo combines pneumatic and electrical drive technology, plus very precise controls and condition monitoring. Like a real kangaroo, the BionicKangaroo robot harvests the kinetic energy of each takeoff and immediately uses it to power the next jump.
Practicing engineers have not heeded Yoda's words.
Design News and Digi-Key presents: Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX, a crash course that will look at defining a project, selecting a target processor, blocking code, defining tasks, completing code, and debugging.
Rockwell Automation recently unveiled a new safety relay that can be configured and integrated through existing software to program safety logic in devices.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service