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NadineJ
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Platinum
nice progress
NadineJ   6/26/2012 12:34:33 PM
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It's good to see continued research in this field.  The gov't-private partnership will expedite mass market applications. 

I'm curious to know if it's being developed just for the Marines or are they the beta testers for the other branches?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Hope this goes commercial
Ann R. Thryft   6/26/2012 2:08:53 PM
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Like a lot of the other military portable/alternative energy projects, I hope this technology makes it into the commercial sector.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Impressive Power
tekochip   6/26/2012 2:35:44 PM
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11W is an impressive amount of power from an array that size.  I'd like to hear a follow-up on how well it worked in the field.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Hope this goes commercial
Rob Spiegel   6/26/2012 2:46:52 PM
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Sounds like this is going to help solve the energy problem for the solider on the go. Since soldiers are carrying increasing amounts of communication electronics, the batteries have become a burden. This could be the solution.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Hope this goes commercial
Charles Murray   6/26/2012 7:05:28 PM
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I agree, Rob. With electronic gear using less and less power, solutions like this could become important.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Hope this goes commercial
Tim   6/26/2012 9:31:19 PM
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I agree that it would be great to have this as a commercial item. It sure beats starting your car to charge your cell on a camping trip.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Basic Needs
Greg M. Jung   6/26/2012 9:37:30 PM
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Great development.  In addition to using electricity to operate electronic devices, I could see a soldier also using this to generate electrcity for a portable water purifier, which could further extend a soldier's range and duration.

Woverholt
User Rank
Iron
This is nothing new
Woverholt   6/27/2012 9:35:42 AM
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I was involved with a design that did this exact same thing and has gone into production 7 years ago.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: This is nothing new
NadineJ   6/27/2012 12:35:30 PM
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Woverholt- Can you give more details?  If your project went into production 7 years ago, is it still available to the public?

Jerry dycus
User Rank
Gold
Re: This is nothing new
Jerry dycus   6/27/2012 2:27:03 PM
NO RATINGS
 

 Nothing new here and available for campers, etc at well stocked outdoor sports stores or online.

200lbs of batteries?  Right!!   That is far worse than the 30lb claim in another recent article here. Just not true for a standard soldier outfiting.

Nor would this unit replace that much battery.  You can get 1kwhr in just 22lbs or less with lithium.  even less if they didn't have to be rechargable.  This unit would take 20 days to make that much power.

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