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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Applying the Material
Ann R. Thryft   6/25/2012 12:24:29 PM
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Jack, there was no discussion about application methods, only the fact that this material can be produced in quantities for high-volume manufacturing (roll-to-roll). Applications seem to be for backplane, not frontplane, glass.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Applying the Material
Jack Rupert, PE   6/24/2012 2:41:58 PM
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Maybe I missed it, Ann, but did you say anyplace what the process is for applying this material to its applications?  There was some talk in the comments about heat, but I wasn't sure if that was for application or if there is some other means.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: CORNING
Ann R. Thryft   6/21/2012 1:45:59 PM
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Thanks, that's the detail I was hoping you could tell us. Aside from the extra visibility of scratches due to the backlight/LEDs, I think your point about not being able to place the keypad flat against the glass and the ensuing air bubbles is especially important. That's not just looks, it's function that is affected.

bobjengr
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Platinum
Re: CORNING
bobjengr   6/20/2012 6:15:33 PM
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Hello Ann--

Great question and I did not answer it with my reply.  My fault.  The total installation involves a clock with various functions; i.e. bake, broil, self-clean, time settings, etc.  These are all indicated by LEDs when the function is activated AND there is a back light.  Any scratch in the key pad overlay would be highlighted by the backlight and / or the LEDs.  Another problem we have is placing the keypad completely flat to the glass, consequently not removing all air bubbles.  Those can reduce the capacitive qualities and lessen the performance and certainly the timing of the function.  We use a device called a laminator.  It looks like a big credit card machine, the old ones anyway, in which an imprint of the card is made by moving a spring-loaded roller over the face of the card.  This smoothes out the bubbles.   It's also important to note that these assemblies are made in a clean room with all of the employees wearing the necessary clean room clothing. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: CORNING
Ann R. Thryft   6/20/2012 1:05:22 PM
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bobjengr, thanks for that info; that's what I thought. So my question is: what's the concern about scratches on the backplane glass, vs the frontplane overlay glass?

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: CORNING
bobjengr   6/19/2012 6:20:55 PM
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 Ann, absolutely—you are correct.      There is a specific "overlay" we use on the front side but it must be protected due to scratching.  One of the issues also (and it's a big one) is heat generated from the elements or burners on the maintop.  Most of my clients use a 105 degree C clock but in some cases we are skirting the upper limits of acceptability relative to temperature.   This is certainly true when you have a very high input burner on the right rear or left rear.  We call these "master blasters".   Combine that with a range hood and you can have a delicate situation.   By the way, I contacted the company and they are sending me literature and design specifications.  Great work on your part.  You made me look like a genius.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: CORNING
Ann R. Thryft   6/18/2012 1:02:16 PM
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bobjengr, thanks for the feedback, especially details about what you'd do with this material. It sounds like you would also use this for the backplane, not the frontplane, material--did I interpret your comment correctly?

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
CORNING
bobjengr   6/15/2012 6:08:16 PM
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Ann, great post and good information.   I have two applications that might be acceptable for this type of materia.  Both are glass-backed control panels that use capacitive touch to activate various controlled manufacturing sequences.  The "keypads" are extremely touchy with an in-house failure rate approaching 50%.  Beth brings up a very good question relative to the durability and scratch resistance of the material.  Any improvement over what we are using would be marvelous.  The temperature characteristics are outstanding and well within what we experience with our 105 degree C application.  Many thanks for this information.

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Corning's Paper-Thin, Flexible Display Glass
Ann R. Thryft   6/14/2012 11:38:16 AM
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Warren, as I said to Beth, it sounds like these products may be targeted for the backplane, not the frontplane. In any case, scratches and impacts from dropping are always a problem with plastics. My RayBans do a good job of resisting both, but their light weight seems to keep them relatively undamaged.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Flexible Display Glass
Ann R. Thryft   6/14/2012 11:37:04 AM
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Thanks, Al. Corning has been in this business a long time. I agree, it's nice to see advancements like this from a company with that track record.

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