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DoubleDog
User Rank
Iron
Re: fuel rom plastic nears commercialization
DoubleDog   10/19/2012 11:38:29 AM
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Your rambling\ranting and your comments do not seem to have much to do with the subject at hand other than your strong desire to stand on a soapbox and give everyone else your political views.  DNC

 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Plastics to fuels
William K.   6/5/2012 6:36:15 PM
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Ann, I am not aware of anyone using this method. It just popped into my head that since both heat and ultraviolet attack the bonds in polymers, that a combination should be even more effective. OThers are certainly welcome to use the concept as long as I get credit for coming up with it. It will be a nice addition to my resume, and it may be of some benefit to humanity as well.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Plastics to fuels
Ann R. Thryft   6/5/2012 11:57:46 AM
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William, thanks for clarifying your statement. I haven't heard of this technology in any of the background information or the studies. What is it called? Can you give us some links?

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Plastics to fuels
William K.   6/4/2012 11:20:18 PM
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Ann, No, the idea that I had was using solar energy, both light and heat at the same time, to break the large molecules up. Essentially a solar furnace with ultraviolet as well..

Leaving the plastic out in the sun does break it down, but it would be a very long time for anything useful to be created.

So the big deal is putting in the right amount of energy, to cause just enough decomposition. The process would indeed be a form of pyrolysis, but with the UV as well, it would be more effective, I think.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: To: naperlou
Ann R. Thryft   6/4/2012 4:03:35 PM
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Dennis, thanks for clarifying the kind of burning you meant. That's entirely different from the fuels creation processes.

Jerry dycus
User Rank
Gold
Re: Links to studies
Jerry dycus   6/4/2012 4:02:05 PM
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  One could use concentrated solar power which gives enough temp to drive the process.  

 The process is going to have enough waste gases that are hard to use, store and just use them to run the process and maybe cook dinner.

If you get to much light gases just run a generator to make, sell electricity. But the big money maker here is gasoline and diesel.

Changing heat, pressures and add  catalysts and you can make most any HC.

Bunter
User Rank
Platinum
Re: To: naperlou
Bunter   6/4/2012 2:42:08 PM
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Hi Ann,

I wasn't thinking in terms of burning during pyrolysis itself but the burning of the fuel created by these recovery processes. This would bother many environmental groups, I believe.

I can see where confusion could result.  Did I understand you right this time?

Take care,

Dennis

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Links to studies
Ann R. Thryft   6/4/2012 11:52:08 AM
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While the smallest Blest units may be "too large" for home use their capacity is about right for use by small groups of people in a neighborhood, or a strip mall of stores, as Jerry suggests and as is currently done in Japan. When the company finishes developing the solar-powered version for use on TOP's boats, that one might be small enough for home use.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fuel from plastic: Burn baby burn????
Ann R. Thryft   6/4/2012 11:50:19 AM
NO RATINGS
William, if you mean just letting plastic sit out in the sun without further treatment, the problems with that method of decomposition are: a) it takes way too long, and b) while it's taking way too long to decompose, particles get into the ecosystem and consumed by fish and birds, and poison water and soil. This is well-known by everyone involved in various forms of WTE and PTE. Or did you mean something else?

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Fuel from plastic: Burn baby burn????
William K.   6/1/2012 9:30:14 PM
NO RATINGS
How about using the sun's energy directly to break apart the plastic molecules so that they can be reassembled into fuel. The benefit of directly driven solar decomposition is that it would not affect the power grid at all, and it would have fewer conversion losses. Just add enough energy to push the plastics back to the original petroleum stock, or something like that. After all, ultraviolet does break plastics bonds when we don't want it to, why not utilize that process when it could be useful.

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