HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: High demand, but low utility?
ChasChas   5/30/2012 11:24:29 AM
NO RATINGS
 

Cars are getting like musical instruments, not everyone can play them.

Some of us can only hum along.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: High demand, but low utility?
ervin0072002   5/30/2012 9:48:40 AM
NO RATINGS

Keep in mind that some of these MCU's are replacing older Analog, Electromechanical, Hydro mechanical or just plain mechanical systems. The mass reduction and simplicity of applying the MCU's makes them ideal. Yea sure Cert time is a little tough but some of these MCU's add cost saving. Other options like collision avoidance etc. are added at the buyers' expense however they are there mostly for brownie points from the car manufacturer. This is what competition does. They add all these features at a few pennies to the dollar and it's all done to lure average Joe to purchase their car instead of the competitors. I personaly still ignore all the background noise and look at the amount of money it takes to buy and maintain a car.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: High demand, but low utility?
Beth Stackpole   5/30/2012 8:07:17 AM
NO RATINGS
That makes sense. Laying the groundwork now and refining the designs as they become a standard part of the car's BOM. I imagine what we see now in terms of driver aid systems will be nothing compared to what we see in the future.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The electrified car
Charles Murray   5/29/2012 7:55:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Nadine, I think it's safe to say that the costs will be absorbed by virtually all automotive consumers, because many of these features will be offered in bundles, whether you ask for them or not. Breaking out the cost of a single feature is unfortunately difficult.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The electrified car
Charles Murray   5/29/2012 7:51:19 PM
NO RATINGS
I think the content figure has already reached about 40%, Rob.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: High demand, but low utility?
Charles Murray   5/29/2012 7:50:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth: I suspect, but cannot prove, that auto engineers see a lot of these features as pieces of the autonomous vehicle puzzle. So you might never use them, but the autonomous vehicle will use them. Lanekeeping and collision avoidance, for example, might one day just take over for you, whether you want them to or not.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The electrified car
NadineJ   5/29/2012 4:23:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point Rob.  Are there any stats on what the new devices will add to the car's total cost?

To Beth and naperlou's point, how often will these extras be used?  If they're offered as an option and too pricey, consumers may choose to opt out.  Turn signlas and seat belts are mandatory, back-up cameras and parking sensors are not.

I still lament the loss of actual driving skills but I learned to drive in San Francisco in a '68 Mustang.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: High demand, but low utility?
Beth Stackpole   5/29/2012 2:00:10 PM
NO RATINGS
@Naperlou: Multiple cues from the car--well, that's harder to ignore than a back-up cam that always makes things appear further away than they actually are. Ok, that's my excuse!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
The electrified car
Rob Spiegel   5/29/2012 1:24:16 PM
NO RATINGS
I remember just a few years ago, analysts were amazed that electronics made up about 10 percent of a car's total cost, an estimate of about $2,000. By 2018, it sounds like that figure will have grown considerably in the percentage of a car's cost as well as total amount. 

If the car is safer, and if the car lasts longer, these costs will be worthwhile. Only time will tell whether the added costs pay off in value.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: High demand, but low utility?
naperlou   5/29/2012 9:08:28 AM
NO RATINGS
It is amazing how many microprocessors there are in cars these days.  I was talking to an engineer and he pointed out that in many cases, instead of using a centralized processor and a sensor that a unit would be built with its own processor.  One seemingly simple example of this is the temperature sensor.  These generally have a small MCU to report the temperature.  The reason is tied into how the automotive industry works.  The automakers design the car and work with suppliers who provide the parts.  This is great for the MCU industry. 

As for the sensors that you don't use, I have seen that in many situations.  I think it was in this site that there have been articles about the automated highway.   There was a comment in one about how the automated vehicles actually stopped at the stop sign (a pet peeve of mine).  I have been in cars where the vehicle gave the operator mutliple ques about what was happening.  The drivers often become used to ignoring them.  Sort of like Beth, come to think of it.

<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Some of our culture's most enduring robots appeared in the 80s. The Aliens series produced another evil android, and we saw light robot fare in the form of Short Circuit. Two of the great robots of all time also showed up: The Terminator and RoboCop.
Two students have created a voice-command system for our homes, based on the simple and affordable Raspberry Pi.
Optomec's third America Makes project for metal 3D printing teams the LENS process company with GE Aviation, Lockheed, and other big aerospace names to develop guidelines for repairing high-value flight-critical Air Force components.
This Gadget Freak review looks at a cooler that is essentially a party on wheels with a built-in blender, Bluetooth speaker, and USB charger. We also look at a sustainable, rotating wireless smartphone charger.
Texas Instruments is rolling out a new microcontroller that could make the design of sensor networks and data logging systems simpler and less costly.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service