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gsmith120
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Re: observation is key
gsmith120   5/27/2012 5:59:16 PM
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NadineJ, you read my mind, video would have been great.  I never get tried of seeing the different robots.

 

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: Robojelly?
Jack Rupert, PE   5/27/2012 5:00:30 PM
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Charles, I think that while the engineers are aiming robojelly at a particular function, in reality that function could be done by other developments.  However, the "cool-factor" comes from the materials being used and the self refueling aspects.  At the end of day, developments like this may very well be a proof of concept with a possible application and the resulting technologies can be broken apart and used elsewhere.

jmiller
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Re: Creepy, crawly with potential
jmiller   5/27/2012 9:31:25 AM
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In college I interviewed for a job in the engineering lab with a team that was big into developing nureal networks and it was really neat to see what they were doing, creating software that an solve problems and learn.  That was a few years ago and I can't even imagine all of the progress they have made. 

jmiller
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Re: Creepy, crawly with potential
jmiller   5/27/2012 9:28:12 AM
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I think this is one of those areas where the final application may not be known by the team working on the initial concept.  It reminds of when I was a kid and building with Legos.  My mom would ask what I was buiilding and I'd answer, "I don't know yet."  It'll be neat to see how some of these robots can be used for the betterment of humanity.

Scott Orlosky
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Re: Nature's inspiration has a middle-man
Scott Orlosky   5/26/2012 3:11:38 PM
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Beth,  I must say that you get to write about the coolest things.  Whether these designs are ultimately practical or not,  I think it's good for the collective knowledge base of mankind to understand how biological systems work, by attempting to imitate them.  In essence humans are participating in a sort of "evolution" by developing various physical and mechanical systems which will eventually be culled out or advanced based on their ability to survive the environments they are subject to (including economic environments!).  I can't wait to see what's next.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Robojelly?
Charles Murray   5/25/2012 5:04:38 PM
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What a great, great slideshow. Admittedly, I have trouble imagining some of applications for these robots. In particular, I'm wondering: Do we know what the civilian applications for the Robojelly, Ann? 

naperlou
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Blogger
Re: Creepy, crawly with potential
naperlou   5/25/2012 2:38:38 PM
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Beth, I think most of these are military or academic.  Building a robot is a good way to figure out how things work.

What really impressed me is the use of nueral networks for control.  It sort of harkens back to the analog days.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Nature's inspiration has a middle-man
Ann R. Thryft   5/25/2012 1:01:12 PM
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Jim, I think you've got a very important point there. I had a similar reaction to the Virginia Tech MARS robot. I think a great deal of what we're seeing in robot design, especially some of the weirder military and biomimicry types, is from the fertile imaginations of sci-fi fans, whether their inspiration comes from the old pulp days, or 50s TV serials (like I grew up on), or later movies. Now that (good quality) CGI is practically indistinguishable from reality in movies, we'll probably see even more.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Creepy, crawly with potential
Ann R. Thryft   5/25/2012 12:53:35 PM
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Beth, I also noticed that most of these were from university labs and R&D. Although several of them, like Boston Dynamics's machines, are funded by the military, some others appear to be highly theoretical, like a few examples from Virginia Tech.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Nature's inspiration has a middle-man
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/25/2012 12:48:07 PM
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Clearly, Nature is one of the biggest inspirations for technology development, but I contend that there is also a very influential Middle-Man to inspiration– that being Science-Fiction.  I say middle-man, because of course, most science-fiction took its inspiration from natural observations, as well.  Point being, the title slide image for this article (Virginia Tech's MARS Spider) immediately hit me as one of the spider robots in Steven Spielberg's Minority Report starring Tom Cruise.  Remember the scene after he had is eyeballs transplanted, and was being chased by spider-bot tracking drones, as he hid underwater in a bathtub-? That scene always ran chills down my spine, contemplating future tech-apps, and this article instantly gave me the same recall!

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