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Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No solution for this one.
Charles Murray   5/25/2012 5:51:57 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, ChasChas.If the engineers received the proper feedback from the field, my guess is that it would have been designed differently the second time around.

CliffG
User Rank
Iron
Re: Lose Plugs...
CliffG   5/25/2012 2:58:47 PM
NO RATINGS
My nurse/neighbor likes the idea of a power light in the plug. Some of my extension cords have neon lights in the clear plug or receptacle to indicate power. I've noticed that they tend to burn out after a few years, but the 3-way tap I just got has an LED power indicator.

The receptacle location so high up it can barely be reached is a contributor, perhaps even the root cause since this issue does not appear to be a problem elsewhere in the hospital.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No solution for this one.
Rob Spiegel   5/25/2012 12:56:29 PM
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Sometimes simply, old fashed advice is the best, ChasChas. Thanks. Perhaps that would have been the best solution off all.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No solution for this one.
Ann R. Thryft   5/25/2012 12:32:14 PM
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I agree with Warren that users are the weakest link in the chain. But that said, as an intelligent, creative and reasonably well-educated user when it comes to things mechanical and electrical, I still find myself stumped occasionally at how to interact with a machine. What used to be common knowledge isn't anymore. There's so much specialized technology in objects we use everyday that without direct experience or specialized knowledge--or well-labeled indicator lights--this type of situation is getting more common.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Battery charging.
Rob Spiegel   5/25/2012 11:20:24 AM
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That makes sense, Ken. So the new plugs were an improvement even though they required more of a push to seat correctly.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No solution for this one.
ChasChas   5/25/2012 11:03:55 AM
NO RATINGS
 

There is a solution that always works.

Long ago I brought an item into a repair shop. The older fellow took one look at it and gave we the best advice of my life.

"Bring it back where you got it from."

What would us engineers do without feedback from the field? And as consumers - we would keep getting the same junk if the engineers don't get feedback.

KMoffett
User Rank
Iron
Re: Battery charging.
KMoffett   5/25/2012 10:51:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Rob,

The old building/NICU had old worn, inadequate number of low to the floor outlets. All that was changed in the new hospital.

Kren

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No solution for this one.
Rob Spiegel   5/25/2012 10:45:17 AM
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Warren, you're right good catch. That's what happens when I read something out of context. That's funny.

streetrodder
User Rank
Gold
Re: No solution for this one.
streetrodder   5/25/2012 10:43:21 AM
NO RATINGS
To build on Ken's argument regarding twist-lock plugs:

Operating rooms used to require twist-lock plugs.  They don't any more.  It doesn't work. 

Reasons:  In the OR, it's not unusual for someone/something to snag a power cord.  with a regular plug, the device comes unplugged - not good, but better than what happened with twist lock plugs.  Those are - the clinician trips, dropping whatever they have, possibly hitting others, etc. etc.  The cord tears out of the plug, rendering the device useless, and depending on the case, causing a major hazard. 

In a NICU, or any critical clinical area, the solution of twist lock plugs/outlets or other specialized combo simply doesn't work.

Think of a hospital as an oversized piece of equipment - except it's always being redisigned on the fly, inputs and outputs randomly change, and a large part of the components (the people) are generally running just above the chaos threshold.

Regards,

Paul Sherman, CCE

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Lose Plugs...
bob from maine   5/25/2012 10:31:52 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm guessing that a partially inserted plug with exposed metal could be considered a hazard, so what may seem to be the obvious solution is to require the plug to be fully inserted by moving the contacts deeper into the socket. Ditto with old worn-out plugs falling out indicating thicker contacts to prevent poor retention. Then the facilities team puts the plug up in the air so the cord can't touch the floor and will be easily seen. Adding the human element of nurses who have become accustomed the old non OSSHA, easy-plug, early wear-out, non facilities enhanced plugs and the expected outcome is exactly what we're seeing. The people designing the next hospital or laboratory unfortunately are not the ones who use all these newly deisgned products. They all look good in a catalog and once bought and installed, they'll last for years.

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