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Thank you for great presentation!

Iron

Writing code in assembly, C and C+ for the Embedded world.  Using C or C# for PC applications.

Iron

From Utah, catching up...

Iron

Had issues in the past with limited resources (CPU) at testing

Hello from Oregon, archive learner

Using C+ preferred or C if necessary -- Android/Java when appropriate

Iron

Systems Engineering Manager

Iron

Looking forward to listening in

Thank you Gary for your answer to my question.  Great session today.

Iron

@rickw95 - Faster electronics can bite both ways. Faster hw may result in unutilized hw bandwidth because the sw is coded assuming slow electronics. Faster CPU will cause faster sw which might break when running on same-speed hw. (We had that problem once.) The best way is to make sure hw provides interrupts and/or done bits for all events and task completions, and then have sw use those bits to know when to move on to the next step.

Iron

@AlanJayWeiner - Keeping or dropping something that "might" be used in the future. Once something is in and unchanging, maintenance efforts are typically low. Taking it out will cause turmoil and needs to be tested. Putting it back in later will cause more turmoil and will need to be tested. Weight that against the likelihood that it will be used later.

Iron

@LevitonDave - Code compile switches can be complicated but it can be done it a way to simplify things. Because I had to support many printer models and ASICs, I developed simplified techniques and have presented classes at conferences on that subject.

Iron

@luizcosta - You sure ask some good, thought-provoking questions. One of the best ways for versioning the hw/sw interface is for hw to have a version regsiter. This allows sw to verify its knowledge of that version. This is especially necessary for FPGAs that change frequently. Also, each block should have its own version register. That's the highlights, if you want more details, send me an email.

Iron

I've not done Android development but I do have an Android phone so I've been following a few apps and have seen where some apps have problems with some phone models. I do agree it does sound messy to try to get an app to work across all past, current, and future models. And it's not just across hw models but also across Android OS versions.

Iron

Re: Feature creap and bloat if adding unnecessary stuff: In sw, you can wait to add it in until needed. If the hw part is there but sw is not, it is generally not a problem. In hw, if you don't add in the feature because it is not needed for this product, you will be forced to make a new ($$$$) chip to add that feature in later. If you add that feature in now, then, even though you can't thoroughly test it with this product, it is there and could be used on the next product without making a new chip. As will all things, good engineering judgement is needed when determining what to put in and what to leave out.

Iron

@flaredOne - "Feature creep" is generally referred to adding in new features. I'm more focused on implementing all exisitng features, not just a subset. And when adding new features, that it doesn't break existing components working with existing features.

Iron

@jl - You said it is sometimes called "backwards compatibility." To me, that is limiting. Also make it forward compatible.

Iron

Thanks everyone. e-see you tomorrow.

Iron

side comment - I'm looking for a desoldering station for thru-holes (vacuum pump type - rather than hot-air for SMDs, although I could use that too).   If anyone has one I can get "real cheap" please let me know.  alan@ajw.com

Alex - please let me know if posting that is ok, and I apologize if it's not.

@Chuck Matthews - Adding unneeded functionality vs. Agile. Agile is fine with sw. You have the agility to add it easily. Agile does not work with ASICs and SoCs that take more than 3 months to make and cost more than $1,000,000. On the sw side, it is okay to not add until needed but if a feature is already in, don't take it out because it is not needed in the next product. Taking it out causes code turmoil and more problems when you have to add it back in for the product after that.

Iron

@luiscost - The fundamental communication between hw and sw is simply sw writes to a hw register when it needs to tell hw something, and hw generates an interrupt when it needs to tell sw something. In most cases, a sw driver totally owns its respective hw registers. No coordination needed. The only complication is that when hw generates an interrupt, it takes some decoding to determine which driver the interrupt is for. Then that driver services it as necessary. IPC is necessary because both processes can't be running at the same time. So IPC is needed to hold messages (and data) until the other process is allowed to run. That's not an issue between hw and sw.

Iron

@micholba - polling vs interrupt. My take on that is that if there is a question, hw should implement it as an interrupt and that allows sw to choose later on whether to poll or to wait for interrupt. It may be that that particular chip is needed two different models where polling is better in one and interrupt is better in the other.

Iron

Outta here, Adieu...

Platinum

If someone does servos, should do a bit about PID loops too. Envelopes and adapting to outside forces (back EMF, wind load, etc).

Platinum

Or maybe that's ten individual variables. I forget. That was a couple of months back.

Platinum

a good matrix for compatibility winds up scrolling off into unexpected dimensions really quickly. Like a system response equation with tenth-power factors (i.e., ten often-unique individual values for some variable).

Platinum

Sysems Integration Test Engineering: For Industrial Control products used in the Transportation Industry.

Iron

I agree, a track on motors/servors would be very useful.

Iron

I said DC motors because.. not just connect and run but we need to know the max efficiency, power output, torque.. so on..

Iron

Using Windows CE for the software menu display interface, sometimes there was not enough memory for including all of the desired features and there was times when they had to decide on which ones to include in the next revision.

Iron

5Cents: No matter what the hardware interface, I vote for the software driver side to be one of the future modules (5 days or more)

Iron

I'll add my vode for steppers as well. DC motors are fairly straight forward as long as the control circuitry is sized appropriately.

Sure, Stepper motor class will be a great help for many people.

Iron

I would also be interested in stepper motors - looking at building a do-it-yourself CNC machine

Alex,

How long are ou planning to keep the Semester One track archived classrooms available?

TIA

Iron

I had a problem when changing from one generation of Microcontrollers to the next. It has a Hardware Module to generate a PWM to control a Power Inverter. This hardware should have been the same in both Generation of chips. That was the statement of the Manufacturer.

In the Frequency Inverter in a Range from 1.5kW to 15kW the change ot the new processor worked fine.

In the next bigger one (22kW) every time you switched on Power the current and temperatdireure Measurement fails. It has been directly destroyed.

After a few weeks we found that if you configure the new µContoller like the old one, the default sates of the PWM outputs are inverted.

This causes to switch all IGBTs in the power inverter on to the same time.

In the smaller Units the hardware to drive the IGBTs prevents this, in the bigger one you could do it.

 

Iron

seems to me that any design counting on 100% clean shut-down is doomed.   Power failures occur, as well as power-supply failures...

Just a Question to Digikey CEC.. How about a week of lecture on DC motors and another week on Stepper motors and drivers?

Iron

@Leviton.. somewhere i read i2c have the pullup resistors.. so consumes more power.. but i am not sure if all the i2cs in all the mcus are similar.

Iron

Counting on embedded sysetms to be shut down cleanly is asking for problems :)

@gordonmx - So, you're former HP Boise. So then you probably recognize some of my war stories. I better not inflate them too much. :-)

Iron

Have done the timer, and reset the power supply. Ugly as can be, but sure does work well. But it depends on the application, and design. Can the power be interupted safely...

Iron

@raghu - look at the idle state of the bus and the requirements to pull up/down. The one that pulls current in the idle state will consume more power. Transitions are going to typically be the same.

Gary,

Pairing New with Old is very important point of yours.

I recommend maintaining an updated matrix that indicates what software and hardware is compatible with each other. Let's call it a Hardware vs. Software Compatibility Table.

Iron

Thanks Gary for the great session. Alex, I'm happy to hear that we'll continue with CEC after a short pause for "summer". See all tomorrow.

Iron

Anyone really INTO interface design, check out the LEAP device reference at the bottom of this chat stack. And I won't mention it again.

 

@Gary, that ESL sounded like a good approximation of the language necessary for hardware and software to be ABLE to discuss a design before the design process even gets started. Something to look into.

Platinum

HOW LONG WILL THE ARCIVED LESSONS BE POSTED.???

@Henador - Bienvenido de Madrid. Ojalá que se disfruta de esta precentación.

Iron

Which consumes lesser power? I2C or SPI?

Iron

weather - I'm outside Boston (Needham, MA) - was rainy, but sun coming out now

 

Great course, thanks.

Iron

Gary - weather is one of those universal items we can complain about. :)

Everybody is posting their place and weather. I'm in Boise, Idaho, and it is mostly sunny and a cool 55 degrees. It was 80 degrees during Monday's lecture.

Iron

Bus contention is handled differently depending on the bus architecture. The contention solutions will depend on what information is available.

@AlanJayWeiner, I remember one of those circuits -- put in a "missing pulse detector" (a 555 timer circuit) designed to detect when RS232 communications stopped from a device which regularly emitted an "I'm here" msg -- and the detector had a relay closure output used to "kick" the power supply on that monitored device enough to cause it to reboot... Lose!

Platinum

great course all-around.

how do you avoid collisions of signals on the bus, and are there standard work-arounds?

@AlanJayWeiner - That is essentially what a Watchdog timer on an MCU is. :)

Thanks Gary, Alex, and Digi-key!

It's just strange -- when the audio interface kicks in (or out) I would SWEAR what I hear it saying is "Lost Hope Radio"...

Platinum

Thanks Gary, Alex, and Digi-Key!!

Iron

Thanks Gary and Alex.

Iron

I remember a story from many years ago - design was to control traffic lights.   About once a week, it would lock up.  They never found the problem, but added circutry to *detect* when the lockup occurred.  That circuit then rebooted the board.  Always found that an interesting solution, even if not a desirable one.

CUSTOMER ENGINEER. verify system operation, reporting back to research engineering as to errors noted in the field an possible causes and solutions. also install an test engineering changes in the field.

 

"if buildings were constructed like software, the first wood pecker to come along would destroy civilization"

a quote from some time ago.

Iron

I had code that worked on a slow computer but when we got new computers in (they were faster). The code did not work anymore. I did finally fix the problem.

But is there a way one can prepare for faster electronics?

Iron

@Alex - there is a start of a PE for software to address these Mission Critical software. Not all states support it yet, but it is comming.

Thanks, guys! (going back to polishing tools in the "toolbox")...

Platinum

@AlanJayWeiner - If you missed any of the presentations, don't forget you can still get them in the archives.

Iron

looking forward to the second semester!!

Iron

super, I am glad to hear there is another series planned in a couple months. good news

Iron

Don't forget to check the bottom of this stack, too.

Platinum

Thanks for the presentation

thanks Alex and thanks to DigiKey

Iron

Thank you Gary for today's presentation

Iron

@Alex - glad to hear more are planned!  These are fantastic; I regret missing some of the sessions.

thank you Gary, great presentation...

Iron

Thanks for the class Gary

Iron

Recent PCB design had to redisign due to EMC

Iron

I had code that worked on a slow computer but when we got new computers in (they were faster).  The code did not work anymore.  I did finally fix the problem.

But is there a way one can prepare for faster electronics?

Iron

As you build up your toolkit, you start finding ALL these things you would LIKE to embed in ASICs, etc. But until then, you really can't design every possible "plug THIS hole" to add in. Just leave extra pins when possible!

Platinum

@Gary - any suggestions for determining when to keep something for future use vs. maintaining something (at cost of maintaining and testing the unused stuff) that ends up never being used?

 

Great session today Gary.  Thanks.

Iron

Maintanence and reuse are directly affected by the features maintaned in source code.

Resource constraints cause inability to use code in some products.

Code compile switches affect Maintainability due to complexity of understanding the code flow.

My boss once told me "Make all my designs Bullet Proof"

Just so things like Slide 17 doesn't happen.

Iron

@ageppert - some of the ideas (e.g., UI in XML, using relative layout for objects) are a great idea, but there's too many cases where things don't work properly.  Very frustrating.

@ageppert - the key word is working with OS (your app won't see the h/w differences, just a standard API provided by a particular version of OS)

Iron

I agree with not changing GPIO pin

Iron

@GARY What did you use for versioning control involving hardware and software integration?

Iron

Prod Support Eng. one time had to ask HW to provide interrupt rather than have sw poll.  When they realized the difference for sw; they agreed, unused resources they could use to provide it.

Iron

working with hardware and software embedded that is now at revision N

 

Iron

oh oh indeed!! now you have to deal with the costs of respinning the chip

Iron

Most of my HW/SW are re-used.

Iron

backward compatibility should be part of the original system requirements, or at least a bullet point in the design

Iron

Sometimes a feature could not be turned off until another feature was first disabled.

You would need to drill down into one of the sub-menus to find it.

Argh!!!

Iron

hardware design – propagation time is always a challenge

Iron

I can't imagine working with the Android OS and getting something to work across an impossibly wide range of hardware.

 

Iron

Worked on one project with almost daily hardware changes - software was always playing catch-up

director of engineering

 

Iron

I'm wary of legacy code for unused features that can't be tested

I'm a Sr. Software apps engineer - helping customers integrate hardware and software we create for embeded systems.  I've seen in some hardware have a ton of options, making one have to dig through the manual to get a basic setup.

Iron

HW/FW System Design Engineer

Iron

biggest problem is stopping feature creap, and bloat

Iron

Sr Electronics Design Engineer

Iron

I graduated already and looking for a job. but when I was a coop student, I didn't face a situation where we lacked resources

Iron

occasional mis-spec of MCU, but rarely

Iron

Lab & Automation Manager

Iron

no problem yet with cpu. designs always a challege.

Iron

I am a Senior Electrical Engineer, both HW and SW

Iron

Job Title: Owner/CTO

Iron

job: Electrical Engineer (hw/fw)

"Feature Creep" is a HUGE potential problem!

Platinum

Engineering Director (HW & SW)

Job: EE, product development

 

Iron

@Alex (repeating, first attempt was lost by the chat) - h/w, s/w and currently focus on standardization

Iron

CPUs are fast enough. I do run into flash memory limitations.

 

Iron

Not a problem with too many features

Iron

Challenging lack of resources: Yes, RAM is finitie, feature creep isn't!

 

Iron

mgr des & eng hw/sw/fw

Iron

lastest problem is with Android project - APIs don't work completely or predictibly  (e.g., layout a UI in relative positioning; control X is sized in % of a container or other control, and positioned relative to other controls/containers) - works in some orientations, and/or on some devices (phones, tablets, etc) but not on all.

 

Job: Mechanical Design Engineer

 

Iron

this is sometimes called "backward compatibility"

Iron

Too many features were included that made it difficult for the end user...

Iron

Thankfully only HW/SW with too much capability.  It is easy to turn thinks off/don't use than to use something that isn't there.

Iron

We have run into this, but it hasnt't been too bad.

Iron

too cluttered is a pain.  simplifying for basic functionality, but modular to allow for later feature additions is much cleaner and retains flexibility

Iron

Adding as much functionality as possible works sometimes, but it is falling out of favor as Agile influence grows. YAGNI - You Aren't Gonna Need It.

Have added features that were never used.  This is better than needing a feature that is not in the hardware.

Iron

Usually not enough stuff.

Iron

Simplifies your business model, too, since you can sell a functionality and easily "enable it" without having to add anything new to the original system.

 

CAN start to look like Microsoft-typical "bloat-ware"...

Platinum

a long time ago a second source UART didn't delay the data ready flag from the error flag. both went out at same time and 10ns gate delay difference was enough for garbled text on the teletype.

Iron

@AlanJayWeiner - I can only hope how soon Comcast will exercise good management intelligence and move on to a new box with new programming.  They'd better do it soon due to competition.  HW+FW management are all needed to make a company successful.

Iron

@Gary - Nokia is famous for having the same piece of h/w packaged in slightly different cases and having slightly different s/w (all pretending to be different phone models)... cost efficiency

Iron

ISRs will often lead to metastable conditions in the software when you don't use mutexes or semaphores.

Worked on an application package which would successfully handle 96 channels of real-time processes -- we used a semaphore mechanism which was artfully derived from the IBM micro-channel hardware synchronization process. Worked amazingly well.

Platinum

8051 uC serial interface - Tx IRQ before stop bit sent, therefore have to add delay before turning off driver for RS485 and add delay at other end before enabling driver so no driver contention

Iron

@GARY: While at HP, did you folks use any synchronization technique between software and hardware communication, similar to IPC in the OSs?

Iron

polling vs interrupts fairly straight-forward, just deciding when to design in "received" or "done" handshaking signals

Iron

pcb layout - regarding SI, can destroy a product even the best chips and the best sw are used

Iron

Hardware does not work as documented.

Iron

example, toggling an output pin with a capacitive load and reading the state too quickly. need to wait for charge/discharge to complete.

Iron

Yes - turn around on RS-485 bus needed delays but had no indication of when current tranmission was completed.

Before I had level interupts I used to get into skewing problems

Iron

Yes, have had race conditions between hardware and software.

Iron

@Ran - I thoroughly agree about Comcast DVR; despise it.  We switched to RCN, which uses Tivo.  Have to say the Tivo interface is vastly superior.  Very consistent and almost completely intuitive.  (must be; my wife can even use it...   :)

 

Thanks for the suggestion, luizcosta. And yes it will continue

Blogger

ALEX: I don't know if this CEC will continue, but here is a suggestion. A week module on a step by step interface design process involving software and hardware, a very simple case study of sorts.

Iron

used a bit-bang method to fix this type of problem

Iron

@Gary – Although I was not involved in the design (I wish I had been), the Comcast DVR presently in use in our area (Motorola DCM-3400-M) is very, very unbalanced and is software heavy.  It is extremely slow (and it's also very full of firmware bugs).  To make certain the problems were not a hardware failure, the box has been changed out approximately 5 times, but the problems remain.  Every time Comcast performs a hardware update, they correct a problem or two, but in the process they break something else.  They are either not hiring competent programmers or they don't know how to find a competent company to which to outsource.

Iron

My experience has been that engineers and programmers have to be forced to collaborate, because many of them like to work in a cacoon.

Iron

edge-triggered vs level ?

@Gary - a bunch of rhetorical questions...

Iron

Haven't run into a balance issue in a long time due to better planning and system design. I'm not taking credit for this, because it was company efforts that resulted in good balance.  Teamwork.

Iron

Yes, more often SW fixes HW problem than other way around.

Iron

I think most projects I've worked on the CPU/hardware is underpowered

Poorly designed semaphore handling (software side) can KILL an otherwise perfectly-capable system (hardware side).

Platinum

Yes, have had less than ideal system performance due to hardware restrictions.

Iron

Hi all. Sorry I'm late.

Iron

End up w/ source that is not as clean as I would like.

Iron

Typically SW has to address the quality issues due to lead time/cost associated with hardware spins.

Most definitely had issues with quiality because of this.

Iron

had to deal with non-standard use of a language that breaks with most attempts to patch a problem.

Iron

Yes, sometimes the performance spec is adjusted based on real CPU power.

Iron

almost always... usually managable.

Iron

Had CPU overload a few times, but more often run out of memory or I/O pins.

Iron

Yes, dealt with CPU overload but then felt very clever about making it work anyway

slight side comment - I remember a case where a signal needed to be inverted before transmitted (to panel light, if I remember correctly); it was easier to do that in software rather than rev the hardware

 

Typically have to deal with overloaded CPU because hardware was to flexible and didn't tke up it's share of the load.

good on the Leap interface. I did register for the developer SDK myself

Iron

Have not run into many problems with HW/SW balancing.

no, have worked on a lot of military systems with 50% reserve in the spec

Gold

Yes, have had CPU overloads.

Iron

Not handled load balancing situation, but tested synchroniztion problems.

Iron

i've had to deal with circuits that were over built with h/w where a simple s/w technique is better and lower power.

Iron

So yeah -- when you have an interrupt routine tickled every 60 milliseconds, and your interrupt servicing routine takes LONGER than 60 milliseconds, you have a problem!

Platinum

Rarely have problem w/ CPU overload

Iron

still in learning mode

 

Iron

(psst -- this is NOT spam, or a commercial announcement: any developers looking for new innovative "game changing" interface development opportunities, scroll down to the very bottom of the chat-stack -- look for reference to signing up for a developer SDK for LEAP interface device. I have absolutely no connection with LEAP, just enthusiasm for what appears to be "next gen" potential.)

Now, back to your regular program, back!

Platinum

yes, bit banging and using a few pins as a simple d/a all work well for small system designs.

Iron

I've been through a very strict W&B on a helicopter tour (they weighted every passenger and assigned the seats based on weight)

Iron

lost audio...  reload didn't fix it.  relogging

 

It's called Weight and Balance (W&B). A FAR requires pilots to do it before every flight.

Iron

Have used Objective-C in the past

language C, going toward C+

Gold

Hi Gary, Alex, and all.

Iron

ASM, C, C+ and PBP too!  :)

working with LabView

Iron

try assembly language with rpn stack operations for a real experience.

Iron

asm = you know what you are doing

Iron

sw guy dealing with hw.

Iron

Good morning from Coquitlam BC

 

Iron

C+ is still the best alternative for OOP in embedded (can't support runtime enviroment for C#/Java for small MCUs)

I'm mostly software, some hardware - have done primarily C, some assembly in past

 

firmware language = C/C+

Iron

@Gary - Language use: C

Iron

real engineers do assembly.... love it.

assembly leave a permenant mark on the way you think!

Iron

C, and Assembly occationally

Iron

coding just as hobby: asm, C

Iron

Seeing most requests for C+ , but I've got a LOT of assembly -- which really only 'works' if you STAY in a particular family of devices too long...

Platinum

Microchip assembler

Iron

Don't forget VHDL/Verilog.

Iron

Language used for embedded systems:

Assembly for space / speed critical areas

C for the rest

language is mostly c with older legacy products usingsome  assy.

Iron

telecommunications  engineer

Iron

C and Assembly (Some C+ )

Iron

For embedded work it is exclusively C.

Java mostly, a few others

Iron

Using C and Assembly Language

Iron

still believe in assembly.

@Gary - mostly C and Assembly

Iron

mostly communication and embedded electronics with firmware support.

Iron

age is a blessing... we should never be ashamed of it even though the popular trend is to oppress this group

Iron

Language C for small (non-RTOS) systems;

C+ for RTOS based systems.

Function: Firmware, software, recommend hw

Controls Engineer, Integrating hardware to operate automation using PLCs

Automotive R&D HW/SW.

Iron

@Alex - HW/SW/FW

Iron

Contract positions - primarily software and firmware - a little hardware.

Hardware/software.

 

Iron

HW/SW Engineer (former HP-Boise)

Iron

Hardware, software, integration

Iron

Firmware embedded with system design/artecture responsibilities.

Embedded systems designer. Both HW and SW.

Iron

job function is sustaining engineering for an instrumentation manufacturer and project team leader.

Iron

Predominantly hardware, but enough software to make my design(s) walk, talk, and fly.

Platinum

Good afternoon Gary.

Iron

Manager, mostly HW, some SW

Iron

Welcome back Gary.

Iron

calibration/eng dept

Iron

hardware design engineer

Iron

embedded design & firmware

Iron

Sr. R&D Technician, HW and SW

Iron

hardware/system engineer some software

 

Hardware, Software, Firmware, Management

Iron

Hello Gary and everyone else. From Madrid, I greet you.

Iron

Good afternoon Alex.

Iron

hi all - Vancouver, BC - 12°C, unusual cold, partially sunny

Iron

Hello Gary... looking forward to another great presentation

Iron

hello to everyone out there in DigiKey land. hope everyone is 'peachy'

Iron

More afternoon showers in Maine...........

Good Morning from Sunny California.

Iron

Morning all - still raining in Portlandia (typical)

From sunny SC 29C = 84 F HI /hey

hello from sunny MIAMI...

Good afternoon folks.

Iron

hello from Spurs country

Iron

Morning All and it Is Sunny Here in CA. Where I am anyway.

Iron

Good morning all from 6C and still raining Edmonton.

Iron

Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.

Blogger


Please join our Digi-Key Continuing Education Center LinkedIn Group at http://linkd.in/yoNGeY

Blogger

The streaming audio player will appear on this web page when the show starts at 2pm eastern today. Note however that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser.

Blogger

Why is it cloudy or raining in NJ right now?

And no, it is not sunny in NJ

Iron

Good afternoon everyone.

Iron

Good afternoon from Sunny CA.

Iron

You guys are a bad influence. Right now, though, you're competing with the tutorial video for the Google "MOOG synthesizer" doodle on their search page today. There's a contest (prize $300) for "best composition" using the synthesizer... re http://www.moogfoundation.org/

Platinum

@flared0ne   Digi-Key Continuing Education Center Tablet Prize Official Rules:    http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=236915

Howdy folks!   :)   (First greeting didn't post?)

@rruther2, just working from YOUR time tick versus your timestamp: are you in Alaska? Hawaii??

Platinum

@cnorton, sorry, didn't have the focus on this window. 

Alex explained that "qualified attendees" are anyone logged in here, basically -- if you're interested enough to attend, you "qualify". So I'm suspecting that they're going to take the list of people who registered AND logged in, and do some form of essentially-random drawing from that list. In a perfect world, they might "weight" any one person's "entry" on the basis of "participation", not just lurking, but that's just me (and a very normal human self-interest) speaking...

Platinum

@flared0ne

Did you ever get an answer as to what you had to do to be "registerd" to win the Tablet from Alex?

Iron

Trying again:

From http://www.youtube.com/user/leapmotion?feature=watch

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d6KuiuteIA

Platinum

Giving this a shot (following the "embed YouTube" directions below, except there ARE no checkboxes for "use old embed code" under the code box -- I see "HD link" and "Long link"). This should be the "Introducing the Leap" video from http://www.youtube.com/user/leapmotion?feature=watch

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d6KuiuteIA is "long link" and

 

http://youtu.be/_d6KuiuteIA?hd=1 is HD link.

Platinum

So "Design for test" would be a robust subset of what you're communicating to us.

 

Encountered any "game changers" in the design field recently?? Had any chance to look at the Leap Motion product, get any feel for how design tools might be about to make an evolutionary jump? While I ponder their claim to 0.01mm detection/resolution (watch for their "writing within a one centimeter square" in their YouTube video), I am struck by how their "cloud of link-interconnected websites" correlates so visually with our "cloud of design-specific particulars needing to be considered during the design process" -- and how gestural access into that cloud would appear to simplify USING that data.

 

If you go to the LEAP website, you can get your name on the list as a potential developer, which would give you a free spatial "recognizer space" device AND access to their SDK. Just don't crowd ME out, please!

Platinum

Heh, heh -- EITHER I'm the first one here, or the chat function is broken. Guess I'm about to find out...

Platinum


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Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
From pitchers and forwards to quarterbacks and defensemen, we offer a peek at some of the more memorable engineers in sports history.
IBM announced it is dedicating $3 billion of funding over the next five years to research and development of new processor technologies.
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