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bobjengr
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Platinum
3- D PRINTING ON THE CHEAP
bobjengr   6/22/2012 8:52:05 PM
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Beth, great article.   I also have been following "additative manufacturing" for some time with my very first indoctrination being from Machine Design, years ago,  on SLA (stereolithography).   This is a fascinating technology and one that has saved my company "tons" of money and time with the production of samples.  In our case, we used full-scale or half-scale models for proof of concept and limited testing.  Form, fit and function fit in there also as being one reason to have models in which we can "kick the tires".    Other companies actually use the products for limited production, if the proper materials can be obtained.   The capabilities improve each year but I certainly did not know the cost is as low as your article states.  Right now, we outsource our needs but with prices being this low, we can certainly afford to "take the plunge".  Again, many thanks.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More Printing
Rob Spiegel   6/6/2012 12:19:30 PM
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Yes, Beth, I agree about the generational change in the use of technology tools. Those graduating from college now will be very adept at these tools and will expect them to be available in the workplace. 

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: More Printing
Beth Stackpole   6/6/2012 7:16:12 AM
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I think we have to get past the thinking that engineers are going to incorporate something like a Facebook into their work processes. The point I'm trying to make is that the up and coming generation is used to communicating in social venues like FaceBook and making use of mobile apps. Because that paradigm is engrained in the way they do everything, they are going to want their serious business tools, i.e., CAD, concept design tools, collaboration, etc., to work in much the same fashion.

They're going want to provide feedback or get feedback on designs, but they'll expect the commentary and collaboration to mimic what they're used to on FaceBook. Being able to search for stuff, like stuff, easily find experts/peer designers, upload models or images for review. It's really about the user interface paradigm, not the specific social network platform and certainly not a public social network platform. For now any way.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More Printing
Rob Spiegel   6/5/2012 2:46:58 PM
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I agree, Beth. This whole generation thing is critical for those in technology now. Apple seems to be able to stay ahead of the changes. As for Microsoft, I agree with Larry Ellison's assessment that MS missed the Internet and still hasn't caught up. And speaking of Oracle, I'm not surprised to hear they're embracing cloud-based delivery after putting it down for years.

As for Facebook, there has been tons of negative chatter. GM pulling out just before the IPO was huge. So we see the statistic that only 17 percent of Facebook users click on ads. Well, 17 percent of 900 million is a lot of people clicking on ads. But they're buying games, not Cadillacs.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: More Printing
Beth Stackpole   6/5/2012 7:26:43 AM
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That's a very good point, Rob. With technology a core competency of this current generation, the idea of being mentored by someone who might not possibility understand the appeal of community on Facebook or isn't wowed by any of the new cloud-based and mobile-based design tools is sure to appear outdated to the new generation and therefore, written off as a non-resource. That view is certainly shortsighted because we all know just because you don't cling to devices 24/7 doesn't mean there isn't a wealth of engineering experience to be mined.

tmash
User Rank
Iron
Re: More Printing
tmash   6/4/2012 5:27:31 PM
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Good stuff....i want to have one at home in the nest 30 days.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3-D printer, "information Vs Knowledge"
Ann R. Thryft   5/25/2012 12:36:15 PM
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William, thanks for the reminder about the difference between data and information. I haven't heard that distinction made for awhile and it's an important one to keep in mind.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More Printing
Rob Spiegel   5/23/2012 11:19:11 AM
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Nice ideas, Ockham. I think sometimes, there are breaks between generations due to advances in technology. I see a break between the millennials and the boomers on technology. So, what might have been a mentor / protege relationship is broken because the two generations do not speak the same technology language.

Ockham
User Rank
Gold
Re: More Printing
Ockham   5/22/2012 6:09:46 PM
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Yes - shocking to hear these kinds of loss of institutional knowledge. As engineers, we have a profound responsibility to those who follow us, elsewise we may well end up as creatures enslaved to a system beyond our understanding  (much like H.G. Wells' Eloi and Morelock in the Time Traveller)


I firmly believe that every engineer needs to see that they live into three professional relational realities. I call it the"Mentor - Peer - Protege" model.

In brief, my thesis is this;

We each need a patriarch who is investing down in us (especially as that patriarch approaches their "own end of service" :-)We should pursue those relationships, and invite by our trustworthy behavior and humility that kind of handoff from such a patriarch.

At the same time, we need a body of peers around us, a group with whom we can share ideas, entrust our own knowledge and sharpen our skills...build a tribe, so to speak.Again, trust - respect - honorable methods to share, agree and especially disagree in a civil fashion.

Finally, we ourselves must be building down into the next generation of engineers, deliberately pursuing relationship with those who will one day take our place. We must stop viewing the protege as a competitor, an enemy, ignorant, untrainable or unworthy of our investment.

 

Of course, this is such a minority view tha no one will ever publish my book, much less purchase it.

 

:-)

 

Cheers,


Ockham

 

 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: More Printing
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/22/2012 1:08:55 PM
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I completely agree – I've been involved with SLA's since their earliest days circa 1988.  Once several internet-based services popped up, where .STLs could be instantly quoted and parts delivered via FedEx within 2 days, I thought that was a breakthrough (Which it WAS.)  But now, even quicker, to see a rough model being generated in-house (in MY House) – this is easily within reach of my small consulting operation – Yes, I will be taking a closer look at getting one.

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