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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive repair system
Ann R. Thryft   5/29/2012 11:53:20 AM
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I think the other differences in car vs airplane accidents are key: cars have (usually) 1-2 people, not tens of people; cars are on the ground, not in the sky, so damage is likely to be greater in a plane crash; cars are driven by private citizens, not company employees; car passengers are more like to travel for "free" vs the ticket price for the privilege of flying in a commercial aircraft with no legroom, absurdly low baggage allowances and crummy food. All of those factors raise our expectations, and I think rightfully so, for the safety of air travel over car travel.

KingDWS
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Re: Impressive repair system
KingDWS   5/25/2012 3:45:25 PM
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That's pretty normal in the industry. And it; s being done by certified by low cost shops. You definitely won't see robotics anytime soon in say Belize. That's a different thing, that's air traffic and ground control. That is all due to human error or just over crowding unless the brakes went and it rolled out in front. As bad as these sound when was the last major crash? And compare that to driving, then you start to see how safe it is. The problem is no one reports a fender bender even in a bus. Take those same people put them in an airplane bump into a building or ground vehicle and its coast to coast news. It just doesn't happen that much so when anything does it gets way over blown as to its importance. So now we know airplanes , cars, bikes, trains an ad walking are no good guess we are stuck annoying everyone else over the internet :-)

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive repair system
Ann R. Thryft   5/25/2012 12:34:18 PM
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KingDWS, I haven't flown a lot in the last few years but before that I didn't see anything as scary as what you describe. OTOH, I have wondered about the apparent decline in maintenance quality in the last decade or so, which became evident after several high-profile near-misses in the air and on the tarmac.

KingDWS
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Gold
Re: Impressive repair system
KingDWS   5/24/2012 4:35:32 PM
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Unfortunately for your flying piece of mind I am referring to Boeing and practices. You have to keep in mind that the airframes keep getting passed down to smaller and smaller operators with smaller operation and maintenance setups. Eventually they just no longer become viable and get junked if they have no cargo capabilities or face noise or excessive fuel burdens. There are still 727's flying cargo and those had to be one of the worst for noise and fuel burn but they are fast and there are cargo door kits still available. The thing you have to keep in mind is if yousee tape holding anything together fake a heart attack and get off :-)

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive repair system
Ann R. Thryft   5/24/2012 3:45:24 PM
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KingDWS, since Boeing et al are the big commercial plane makers, it seems that your comments about repair don't refer to them. So what class of planes are you talking about? They don't sound like aircraft most of us are likely to fly on. Is that correct?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Impressive repair system
Rob Spiegel   5/24/2012 2:02:37 PM
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Ok, that makes sense, KingDWS. Only the major work goes out of the country. 

KingDWS
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Gold
Re: Impressive repair system
KingDWS   5/23/2012 5:29:18 PM
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The normal work being done are the major checks which are very labor intensive or repairs such as corrosion that require a lot of labor as well. These type of operation usually require the airplane to be almost strippedbareduring the repair. The day checks are normally done at the airlines maintenance facility or regional facility these are fairly minor compared to other inspections or repairs. These shops and repairs still need to be done according to the book so they are licensed and the materials are the proper ones. The ones I would worry about are from peru columbia a few other places those are not exactly reputable repairs (I'd rather walk :-) ) Unfortunately the whole industry is very cost driven so this is going to become more common. Dave

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Impressive repair system
Rob Spiegel   5/23/2012 3:10:04 PM
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Well, that is surprising, King DWS. Who is using these services? The major U.S. airlines? I would think they would have their own inhouse repair operation. But maybe not. Gives me a queasy feeling.

KingDWS
User Rank
Gold
Re: Impressive repair system
KingDWS   5/23/2012 2:53:25 PM
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In theory the shops and people or someone has to have the same certifications as up here. You only need one person with the right tickets to sign things off and that's legal. This has been going on more and mores since about the 80"s and perhaps longer that's when I started. Put it to you this way, have you ever flown south on what seemed like a old rattly hunk of junk and then a week later fly north on a nice fresh one. Most of these shops do the very expensive major checks and inspections, the fuel cost is actually not much of a factor to get them down there even when flown empty. Like I said the robots are cool but cheap labor rules.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Impressive repair system
Rob Spiegel   5/23/2012 11:23:10 AM
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Interesting, KingDWS. I didn't realize aviation repairs were getting outsourced to low-cost labor markets. Do these low-cost sites have to produce skilled technicians. Are there regulations governing the quality of these repairs?

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