HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 5/7  >  >>
Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Reducing inventory
Cadman-LT   5/20/2012 6:24:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree. I could see rather than having everything in stock you would only need to have the CAD/CAM programs from the manufacturer and make as needed. That could extend to so many other industries as well.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Reducing inventory
Beth Stackpole   5/18/2012 7:51:14 AM
NO RATINGS
I think that's where we are heading, Chuck. Not overnight, of course. But 3D printing has made some dramatic turns in terms of price reductions and capabilities this year and the scenario you outline is where most experts see the broadest impact. Just think back three or four years ago--most people didn't carry smart phones. Now most do. With certain technologies, the tide can turn pretty quickly and I think 3D printing has that potential.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Reducing inventory
Charles Murray   5/17/2012 5:22:49 PM
NO RATINGS
The automotive taillight is an interesting application. I wonder if we can foresee a day when dealerships and garages will be able to make plastic parts on site, thereby reducing inventory for the parts department.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fun side
Beth Stackpole   5/17/2012 8:03:08 AM
NO RATINGS
@ervin: All good points. There is a steady stream of boat and automotive makers already using 3D printing to produce prototype parts and in some limited run cases, production parts. It seems to be prevalent in the racing industry where you're really optimizing and many of these things are one-offs or close to it.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
ADDATIVE MANUFACTURING
bobjengr   5/16/2012 7:39:09 PM
NO RATINGS

Beth, excellent article and to think, David Deckard started it all with stereolighography.  He was a graduate student in those days but launched a new technology that is now called "additive manufacturing.   Several months ago I wrote a paper on that manufacturing technique for PDHonline.org.    There are several processes that fall under that description.  These are as follows:

  • Stereolighography
  • Selective Laser Sintering
  •  PolyJet Printing
  •  Fused Deposition Modeling
  • Laminated Object Manufacturing
  • 3D Printing
  • Shaped Deposition Manufacturing.

All are fascinating and save countless hours when prototyping a component.   Engineers always like to "kick the tires" prior to committing to a specific design and these prototyping techniques allows for just that.  Again—great piece. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D fun
Charles Murray   5/16/2012 6:42:01 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, smith120. More so than any other subject we write about here at Design News, these pictures really do tell the story. Each time I click through the photos, I end up saying, "They built that with a 3D printer?"

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 3D fun
gsmith120   5/16/2012 5:34:53 PM
NO RATINGS
I really enjoy the 3D articles especially when pictures are provided.  It is amazing the different things that are created using the 3D printers. I'm glad prices are decreasing this opens some new doors for lots of small companies.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: Fun side
ervin0072002   5/16/2012 12:54:48 PM
NO RATINGS
I have been following the posts about 3D printing and it is interesting. It only stands to reason that once the platform is designed and standardized that material scientists will get on board and find ways to meet your manufacturing needs. It's all a supply and demand curve. With 3D printers demanding more options out there and easier to attain manufacturers will get creative quickly. I have heard that marine and automotive are already considering of 3D printing some parts for low production numbers. I don't see this being ideal for any mass produced part since injection molding will still rule that field. Also keep in mind that some of the Composite material airplanes today use special made 3D printers. So if one of the most controlled transportation industries in the world is allowed to use 3D printers I don't see why other applications cannot be allowed?

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Fun side
ChasChas   5/16/2012 10:30:19 AM
NO RATINGS
 

And to think this is only the fun side. How far are we on the serious side - printing in metals, printing mold/casting plugs, etc. or even actual manufacturing?

RNDDUDE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 3D fun
RNDDUDE   5/16/2012 10:12:19 AM
NO RATINGS
I have been a user of various RP technologies for over 10 years, and it can be invaluable in getting evaluation versions in your hands, even functional prototypes are now the norm given all of the material choices available. I recall a few years back a webinar with a guy who was a big proponent of the future of consumer-level RP machinery. He invisioned people having consumer versions of 3D printers at home to allow them to download 3D files directly from manufacturers so that they could build their own replacement parts for various consumer products that had failed. I think that is still a ways off, but an interesting idea, nontheless.

<<  <  Page 5/7  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Lockheed Martin is looking to a new novel alloy and casting process to cut expenses on the F-35 Lightning II -- the world's costliest fighter jet.
After impressive test results, QM Power's Q-Sync fan motor has been identified as an emerging energy-saving technology and earned additional funding from the Department of Energy.
Henn'na Hotel, a next-generation, eco-friendly hotel in Nagasaki, Japan, is staffed almost entirely by robots.
With the pace of new editions and iterations, designers can fall behind quickly on software knowledge and skills. That's where JIT software training comes in.
After more than a century of dedicated service, metals are still upping their game and delivering lighter, stronger bodies and frames to the auto industry.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
6/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/24/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/11/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
8/13/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 3 - 7, Developing, Testing, and Troubleshooting IPv4 and IPv6 Using Wireshark
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Course August 25-27:
Sponsored by Stratasys
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service