HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>
ironhorse
User Rank
Iron
Re: Tethered Power
ironhorse   5/11/2012 3:44:01 PM
NO RATINGS

Not a farm boy, I suppose ...

The cabling I've seen for 100+ Amp service is on the order of that I've seen for lightning protection.  Remember, it is not the instananious amps, it is the integral of I^2Rdt, yes, huge I, but tiny t. -- I'm not concerned.

Aircraft are now being made of composites, so conductors must be integrated into the surface, as is needed with LTAV, too.  Even aluminum aircraft have cabling strung internally to guide the strike current.

A point is that aircraft and power system designers both have to know how to deal with lightning.  Tethered balloons with conductive lines to the ground go back to the 1860's at least.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tether questions
Ann R. Thryft   5/11/2012 12:46:10 PM
NO RATINGS
At the end of the press release appears this statement: "In December 2011, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) released draft guidelines allowing the new class of airborne wind systems to be sited under existing regulation." After half an hour of web searching, mostly on the FAA site (where I've successfully found draft guidelines and advisories before), I couldn't verify it. Can anyone tell us more about these guidelines and what they cover?

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tethered Power
warren@fourward.com   5/10/2012 7:57:41 PM
NO RATINGS
But aircraft are a flying Faraday shield with no direct connection to ground.  Lightning strikes are mega-amps, or at least a gaggle of amps.  I wonder, not being a lightning guy, if the cables can carry the mega-load and be light enough at 1000' to keep the system afloat.  That's all I'm saying.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A lot of questions remain...
warren@fourward.com   5/10/2012 7:53:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Your write!  I mint to say litening.

To quote the great Eeyore, "Thanks for noticing me..."

ironhorse
User Rank
Iron
Re: Tethered Power
ironhorse   5/10/2012 5:09:59 PM
NO RATINGS

Aircraft are regularly struck by lightning.  Tethered aircraft have some advantage here over free flying craft.  Like church steeples, they may carry grounded lighting protection equipment. The very fact that the turbine is in the wind means it will develop significant static charge (ask Chinook ground crews).  I can't imagine why the static discharge and lightning grounding function wouldn't be integrated into the power conductors, Suplimented by any designed-in structural teather metal (reenforcing steel or aluminum). Lightning protection and tolerance is already integral to both power system design and aircraft design and certification.

Thinking_J
User Rank
Platinum
A lot of questions remain...
Thinking_J   5/10/2012 4:58:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Too many missing details in article ..hopeless to make meaningful comment on.

It was indicated this project was intended to power remote sites.. not (at this stage) intended to compete with large wind turbines used by power companies, as implied in numerous comments.

 

To those making comments, please check your meaning of what you spell: (everyone makes mistakes)

Lightening... spelling used... meaning: to reduce weight (related to subject matter, but not likely intended meaning in question)

Lightning.. big electrical discharge (likely intended use) and can be addressed numerous ways on this project. Related to handling numerous storm situations (retract the system?).

Lighting.. to illuminate.

Just saying.....

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Does it need a babysitter?
Rob Spiegel   5/10/2012 3:18:26 PM
NO RATINGS
That could be, Warren. We'll have to see. You're right about the value of the energy. If it's significant, someone will figure out how to fit the maintenance in. Could be these turbines that go to higher altitudes might make the energy harvesting worth the trouble.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Does it need a babysitter?
Rob Spiegel   5/10/2012 1:35:20 PM
NO RATINGS
At any rate it's a good idea simply because it aims to harvest wind in a location where there is more significant wind than near the ground. I'm also interested to see how things work out with wind harvesting out on the ocean. That's another attempt to get to stronger winds.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tether questions
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/10/2012 1:22:49 PM
NO RATINGS

When you think about the Wind Farms we've seen – rows and rows of gigantic wind turbines in the Southwestern part of the country – I can imagine these things becoming commonplace in the sky – so much so that pilots would have to have them charted;  (that shouldn't  be too cumbersome of a task, considering NASA is tracking 1000's of pieces of space debris).  This concept seems financially lucrative and technologically feasible.  Two-Thumbs-Up.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tethered Power
Ann R. Thryft   5/10/2012 1:11:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Warren, good questions. I also wonder about the tether material and how it handles different voltage levels, as well as the whole ground system for receiving and distributing power. The company says it is looking for partners for commercialization. Perhaps once it gets past this stage we can learn more details.

<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service